Tag: pumping tires


Tim Thomas isn’t pumping Holtby’s or his teammates’ tires


There were some curious reactions to comments made by Bruins goalie Tim Thomas following Thursday’s 2-1 loss to the Capitals. According to ESPN Boston’s Jimmy Murphy, an interview Thomas conducted with NESN did little to compliment Braden Holtby’s great game and seemed to point the finger of blame at his teammates for only scoring once.

Tweets, from Murphy:

“Just watched Tim Thomas on NESN post-game. Calls out teammates. Not surprised.”

“Funny how according to Thomas two goals Caps scored and goals Bruins didn’t score are on Thomas’ teammates. #blameeveryoneelse”

“Tim Thomas apparently not part of goalie’s union. Doesn’t give any credit to Braden Holtby and blames teammates.”

More, from NESN:

“We had a lot of shots, but as far as high-quality scoring chances? I wouldn’t say we got a lot of those,” Thomas said. “If you’re going to get those shots and get pucks to the need you need people in front of the net screening, tipping and getting rebounds.

“That’s seems to be our problem this series, getting that down.”

OK, to be fair, Thomas might just be staying on point. After all, he said it wasn’t his job to “pump Roberto Luongo’s tires” so maybe he shouldn’t be expected to do so for Holtby, either.

Haggerty also collected David Krejci’s thoughts on the game, which seem pretty reasonable since the Boston Bruins fired 45 shots on Holtby.

“Maybe we panicked too much, I guess,” Krejci said. “I don’t know. I think we had so many chances we could have won the game. That’s the story of the game.”

Haggerty reports that Krejci also used the term “frustrated” six times, so while Thomas and his teammates might not see eye-to-eye on the source of the blame in Game 4, there might be a consensus on the resulting emotions.

Tim Thomas says that he doesn’t have any issues with Roberto Luongo

Boston Bruins v Vancouver Canucks - Game Seven

There are quite a few revenge cliches out there, but I prefer the upbeat tone of “Living well is the best revenge.”

Practically speaking, that advice might fall a bit short of being useful for many people. When you’re angry with someone, it’s tough to imagine your own triumphs burning that opponent as much as a direct confrontation. In most cases, it should probably be said that “Living well is the best [way to avoid the messy consequences of] revenge.”

Sports are one of the rare places in which you can put that philosophy to direct use, though. Winning individual trophies and the Stanley Cup must be the best hockey example of “living well,” so it makes sense when Tim Thomas says that he has no issues with Roberto Luongo, whom he beat out for the Vezina Trophy and Stanley Cup in 2010-11.

Perhaps Thomas should even thank Luongo for deflating his tires in that championship round. It’s hard to imagine a player getting more inspiration to succeed than the chance to raise the Cup, but Thomas was also asked to defend his unorthodox style even after proving its merit countless times during the winding road that has been his NHL career.

Luongo recently admitted that he regrets his comments about Thomas during that seven-game series, but Thomas reiterated that he doesn’t have any hard feelings for Bobby Lou.

Tim Thomas had his second day with the Stanley Cup on Saturday, taking the trophy back to his alma mater the University of Vermont, where he played four seasons (1993-97) and led the Catamounts to back-to-back NCAA tournament appearances, including a Frozen Four in 1996.

Thomas was asked about his unorthodox goaltending style, and he referenced that opponents still question his technique. Following a press conference at the university, Thomas was asked if he had the chance to speak with Canucks goaltender Roberto Luongo — who earlier this summer admitted that he regretted questioning Thomas’ goaltending style following Game 5 of the Stanley Cup finals — at the NHL Awards in Las Vegas.

Thomas said it was never an issue as far as he was concerned.

“That was the media,” Thomas said. “We’re fine.”

At this point in his career, Thomas shouldn’t have much more to prove. Thomas proved that his first Vezina Trophy season wasn’t a fluke by adding another one to his mantle while also earning a Stanley Cup and Conn Smythe Trophy. Going forward, his feisty competitive spirit (and maybe a dark horse candidacy for a Hall of Fame bid?) are the two things that might drive him to maintain his place as an all-world goalie.

Thomas is probably used to slights after fighting through European leagues and finally finding a place in the NHL, so it’s nice that he’s not bothered by those comments – or at least he’s saying the right things publicly. His opponents might want to think twice about critiquing his style in the future, though.

Deflated tires: Roberto Luongo has second thoughts on Tim Thomas Stanley Cup comments

Boston Bruins v Vancouver Canucks - Game Seven

While most of us would switch places with a high-level professional athlete like Roberto Luongo in a heartbeat, it’s easy to ignore the drawbacks that come with that job. There are a lot of challenges – from physical pain to the pressure to win in a sport with a small margin of error – but one underrated task comes when players must address the media just moments after they win or lose.

Under normal circumstances, players are prepared to answer reporters’ questions with any number of cliches that pump up their opponents and how hard everyone worked. That being said, the beauty of post-game press conferences is that every now and then, a player lets his guard down and actually says something interesting (and maybe even inflammatory).

One of those moments came after the Vancouver Canucks beat the Boston Bruins 1-0 in Game 5 of the 2011 Stanley Cup finals, when Roberto Luongo critiqued Tim Thomas after the unorthodox goalie’s aggressiveness backfired for the game’s only goal. Luongo said he would have made the save on Maxim Lapierre’s goal (which happened after Kevin Bieksa bounced the puck off the boards on purpose to take advantage of Thomas’ aggressiveness) and also griped that Thomas hadn’t flattered Luongo during the series. Thomas responded by joking that it wasn’t his job to pump Luongo’s tires.

Those comments looked bad enough after that Game 5 win, but it seemed like a significant foot-in-mouth moment in retrospect. There was a stark contrast in the two goalies’ play in the last two games of the championship series; Thomas allowed two goals in Boston’s two wins while Luongo was pulled from Game 6 and allowed three goals in Vancouver’s Game 7 loss.

This must be a painful off-season for the oh-so-close Canucks, but Luongo received the greatest amount of blame for Vancouver’s crushing defeat. Canucks Army provides a translated interview that covers the goalie’s summer, including his regrets about making those comments about Thomas.

“I thought of the finals earlier in the summer, but now I think it’s a part of the past.” said Luongo. “I have good memories of last year, it was a very good season. But it sure hurts a little. I especially remember the last game in Vancouver. It’s hard to relive the final seconds of the seventh game in the Stanley Cup finals.”

“Fortunately, I spend my summers in Florida and it’s pretty quiet there,” said the 32 year old goaltender in consolation.


Does Luongo regret the statement [about Thomas]?

“Yeah, for sure. If I could do it again, I wouldn’t say it. I didn’t want to create the buzz that it did. After the fifth game, I had never been so emotional and I got carried away.”

Luongo received a lot of abuse for his statements and struggles during that seven-game series, with much of the wounds being self-inflicted. Even if he’s had his low moments, Luongo had a great regular season and his fair share of strong playoff performances. If he can keep the media and fan criticisms from getting to him, he has a great chance for another standout season in 2011-12.

Luongo might want to be a little more careful about what he says from now on, though.