Tag: Pavel Bure

Pavel Bure

Fanspeak: Pavel Bure voted greatest Canuck in franchise history


This summer, NBC Sports’ social media team is conducting the #NHLGreatest initiative, designed for fans to choose the best player in each franchise’s history. Balloting was conducted through three platforms — Facebook, Twitter and Instagram — with thousands of votes being cast. The results of this initiative will be released throughout the month of August, in conjunction with PHT’s Team of the Day series.

Vancouver Canucks

1. Pavel Bure — 836 votes

2. Trevor Linden — 332 votes

3. Markus Naslund — 159 votes

4. Mark Messier — 97 votes

When you think of the Canucks, often times memories go straight to 1994 and their run to the Stanley Cup Final against the New York Rangers. While they lost that series in seven games, one of the most memorable players during their playoff run that season was Pavel Bure.

The “Russian Rocket” led all playoff goal scorers in those playoffs with 16 and had 31 points overall. Had things gone differently in that Game 7 in Madison Square Garden, it’s possible he would’ve won the Conn Smythe Trophy and canonized as the patron saint of Vancouver.

Instead, all he did was score 254 of his 437 career goals for the Canucks in a career marred by injuries. For the NHL, he was the human highlight reel using his blazing speed to get behind defenses and make goaltenders quake as he came roaring in to score. His back-to-back 60-goal seasons in 1992-93 and 1993-94 stand out as his best work in Vancouver and reasons why they retired his No. 10 last season and led to his election to the Hockey Hall of Fame in 2012.

While he doesn’t have the all-time standing in goals or points the way Naslund and Linden do, Bure’s breathtaking play helped make him the fans’ choice as the greatest player in franchise history.

By the way, congrats to the fans who attempted to swing the vote for Messier. You cracked the leader board.

Pavel Bure to consider running Sochi KHL expansion team

Pavel Bure

One of the upsides for Sochi getting the Olympic Games was what it would do for them after the events are over. One thing that’s seemingly going to happen is they’ll be getting a KHL expansion team and they may have a superstar to run it.

According to agent Darryl Wolski, Hockey Hall of Famer Pavel Bure is considering being the man to run the new franchise. The new team would begin play in 2014-2015.

Bure has been the face of the potential Sochi franchise since it was announced they would be getting a team. A story from Ria Novosti in September got his thoughts on being an executive of the franchise.

“I have experience and understanding of what needs to be done,” said Bure. “I saw what was done in Los Angeles, California, where it was hard to make the Kings popular, because they had Lakers [NBA team] that were winning everything. But look at them now: the team already took the Stanley Cup and their arena is always full.”

Being a former superstar player has helped out others in landing jobs in the KHL. Sergei Fedorov is the GM of CSKA and Alexander Mogilny is the GM of the team in Vladivostok. Seeing Bure land in Sochi would give that team an immediate boost of credibility.

Under Pressure: Jonathan Huberdeau

Jonathan Huberdeau

“Under Pressure” is a preseason series we’ll be running on PHT. For each team in the NHL, we’ll pick one player, coach, GM, mascot or whatever that everyone will be watching closely this season. Feel free to play the song as you read along. Also feel free to go to the comment section and tell us we picked poorly.

For the Florida Panthers we pick… Jonathan Huberdeau.

Being the brightest young star on a team desperate for consistent success can be hard. Such is the case for 20-year-old Huberdeau in Florida. Last season he took home the Calder Trophy as the league’s top rookie but for the Panthers he represents something else: Hope.

The Panthers were crushed by injuries and misfortune last season. Jose Theodore’s injury forced prospect Jacob Markstrom into the fire as the team’s starting goalie. Guys like Kris Versteeg, Ed Jovanovski, Stephen Weiss, Sean Bergenheim, and Scottie Upshall all missed significant time with injuries.

Huberdeau and Tomas Fleischmann were the two regulars in their top six who managed to stay healthy all season and they led the way in points. For a kid as young as he is, Huberdeau handled it all with aplomb. After a summer and preseason filled with changes, it’s up to him to just not be a complementary player, but a leader.

After putting up 31 points last season in 48 games, Huberdeau will have those injured guys back to surround him and with that his production will pick up. Now that Weiss moved on to Detroit, he’s now the top guy on the top line which means we should get more opportunities to see goals like this:

Huberdeau will need to have a John Tavares-like evolution of his play and become the superstar the Panthers haven’t had since Pavel Bure played there. Without that kind of improvement, Florida won’t be able to take that next step.

He should have more help this season, but it’s up to him to make the Panthers a playoff contender in the Atlantic Division.

For all of our Under Pressure series, click here.

Your casual reminder of just how good Pavel Bure was

Pavel Bure

In anticipation of Monday’s Hockey Hall of Fame induction ceremonies, PHT is taking an in-depth look at each of the four main entrants. 

 Whether it was before or during the dead-puck era of the 1990s and 2000s, Pavel Bure always proved why he was a Hall of Fame talent. The only thing that kept him from being an all-time career goal scoring leader were injuries.

Fans in Vancouver are busy debating whether or not they’ll retire Bure’s No. 10 but when you look at what his career entailed, there’s no doubting he’s a Hall of Famer, injuries and all.

Bure played 13 seasons in the NHL. Of those, he had three that went uninterrupted by injury (92-93, 97-98, and 2000-01). In those years he scored 60, 51, and 59 goals, the latter of which led the league.

In the Canucks’ Stanley Cup finals year in 93-94, Bure missed just six games but led the league in goals with 60. In 1999-2000 with Florida, he missed eight games and scored a league-leading 58, 14 of which were game-winners (also a league-leading stat). Even in spite of the injuries, he still scored 437 goals.

Did you need more of a reminder of how good he was? Good, because YouTube is teeming over with Top Ten reels of his goals and other goodies, but two in particular show off his greatness.

First up, his puck from skate to stick deke against Boston.

That highlight has probably been seen a thousand times and never gets old… Unless you’re a Bruins fan bummed out at seen Ray Bourque getting spun around.

Speaking of often-seen highlights, Flames fans might want to just skip this part entirely. Game 7 in the 1994 playoffs saw Bure deliver one of the most clutch goals in Canucks history with his triple-overtime game-winner.

Report: Canucks to retire Pavel Bure’s No. 10

Pavel Bure

After much debate in Vancouver, Pavel Bure is about to be properly honored by his first NHL team.

Jason Botchford of the Vancouver Province hears from former Bure teammate Gino Odjick about how Canucks owner Francesco Aquilini will meet with The Russian Rocket to bury the hatchet and honor him by retiring his number.

“It was touching, to have an owner that’s involved and recognizes he’s the first player with the Canucks to enter the Hall of Fame,” Odjick says.

“For him to fly from Vancouver makes this a really great week, I tell you. Francesco has been talking about [retiring his jersey] for quite a while.

“I don’t see it not happening.”

It’s been hotly debated in Vancouver for years about how Bure’s number hasn’t been retired by the team.

In seven seasons with Vancouver, Bure scored 254 goals with 478 points while leading them to the 1994 Stanley Cup finals before asking to be traded in 1999.

His demand to be moved still sits poorly with many fans and is the reason why many don’t want to see him honored the same way as former captains Stan Smyl, Trevor Linden, and Markus Naslund.

All that aside, he was their most dynamic and exciting player during his time in Vancouver and it was his time there that led to him being elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame.