Paul Kariya

Getty Images

Hockey Hall of Fame class of 2017 grew the game in many ways

4 Comments

The Hockey Hall of Fame will induct its 2017 class Monday night in Toronto. The seven individuals who will be enshrined include five players and two builders.

Clare Drake, Jeremy Jacobs, Dave Andreychuk, Danielle Goyette, Paul Kariya, Mark Recchi and Teemu Selanne will join the many other legends inside the old bank building on Yonge Street forever. Their contributions as a whole, no matter their position in hockey, helped grow the game to what it’s known as today.

Builder

Clare Drake — The most successful coach in Canadian university hockey history won six national championships in 28 years at the University of Alberta. He retired in 1989 with a record of 697-296-37, which comes out to a .695 winning percentage. Drake not only contributed at the university level, he also spent time at the professional level with a year coaching the Edmonton Oilers in the WHA in 1975-76, working as a Winnipeg Jets assistant in 1989-90 and helping out the Dallas Stars during the 2001 Stanley Cup Playoffs. He was also behind the bench for Canada’s entry at the 1980 Olympic Games in Lake Placid, N.Y. Drake’s last legacy may be his role in developing players and educating coaches through his contributions to the Canadian Coaching Certification Program.

Jeremy Jacobs — Since purchasing the Boston Bruins since 1975, the franchise has made the Stanley Cup Final six times, winning once. He’s been Chairman of the NHL Board of Governors for the last 10 years was the recipient of the Lester Patrick Trophy in 2015 for his “outstanding service to hockey in the United States.”

Player

Dave Andreychuk — Only 13 players in NHL history have scored more goals than Andreychuk, who put up 640 in 1,639 NHL games. Of those 640 goals, 274 came on the power play, the most in NHL history. A two-time All-Star and 2004 Stanley Cup champion with the Tampa Bay Lightning, ‘Andy’ hit the 50-goal mark twice in his career. It also hard to imagine many of his goals that weren’t scored from around the blue paint.

Danielle Goyette — A two-time Olympic goal medalist and eight-time winner at the World Championship as part of Team Canada, Goyette hung up her skates with 113 goals and 105 assists in 171 games representing her country. During the 1998 Olympics, she led all players with eight goals. Four years later, in helping Canada win gold, she tied for the scoring lead with 10 points. In 2006, as she helped her country to a second straight gold, she was selected as flag bearer during the Opening Ceremonies. Currently, Goyette is the second-leading scorer in women’s Olympic history with 15 goals.

Paul Kariya — Kariya’s hockey accomplishments didn’t just come while part of the NHL. Before he was drafted fourth overall by the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim, he won the World Junior Championship with Canada and later the NCAA title with Maine in 1993. A year later he would win gold at the World Championship and in 2002 was part of the Olympic winning Canadian side at the Salt Lake Games. Eleven games shy of 1,000 games for his career, he finished with 402 goals and 989 points — on the dot to be a point per game player over his career. A two-time Lady Byng winner and seven-time All-Star, Kariya is well-remembered for his goal during the 2003 Stanley Cup Final, which came 10 minutes after a vicious hit from Scott Stevens of the New Jersey Devils:

Mark Recchi —One of four players in NHL history to play more than 1,700 games, Recchi enters the Hall as a five-time Stanley Cup champion, three of which came during his playing career. He’s one of 10 players in history to win a title on three different NHL teams, and his career ended with 577 goals and 1,533 points. Outside of a 15-game first NHL year, he scored double digit goals in 21 straight seasons.

Teemu Selanne —Selanne introduced himself to the NHL world in spectacular fashion with a 76-goal, Calder Trophy winning rookie season in 1992-93. The goals continued over the next 22 years as the “Finnish Flash” scored 684 of them, good for 11th all-time. He’s also the all-time leading scorer in Olympic history with 43 points in 37 games. His trophy case is filled with one Stanley Cup, a Masterton Trophy, Rocket Richard Trophy, four bronze and one silver Olympic medals, and silver and bronze from the World Championship, among many other honors. We all, of course, remember the goal and celebration that helped him break the rookie goal scoring record in 1993:

Also being honored in Toronto are Cam Cole, winner of the Elmer Ferguson Memorial Award “in recognition of distinguished members of the newspaper profession whose words have brought honor to journalism and to hockey” as selected by the Professional Hockey Writers’ Association, and late NHL play-by-play man Dave Strader, who is this year’s Foster Hewitt Memorial Award honoree for his outstanding contributions as a hockey broadcaster.

What are you favorite memories from this year’s inductees?

————

Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

Video: Getzlaf, Ducks top Stars

Ryan Getzlaf and Corey Perry each had a goal and an assist as the Anaheim Ducks defeated the Dallas Stars 3-1 on Sunday night.

Anahiem has now won five of its last seven while the Stars are winless in six.

Cayton Stoner had the other Ducks goal. John Gibson made 39 saves for the win.

Patrick Eaves had the lone Stars goal.

Jhonas Enroth stopped 19 shots in the loss.

With his two point night, Getzlaf (669) moved into a tie with Paul Kariya for second place on the franchise’s all-time points list.

The Ducks lost TIm Jackman early in the first period to a lower body injury. Bruce Boudreau said the forward is “day-to-day”.

Anaheim has held Dallas to just one goal in each of the first two meetings between the two clubs. The pair meet for a third and final time on April 8 at the Honda Center.

Alex Steen’s concussion recovery troubles continue

1 Comment

Blues forward Alex Steen has had his struggles this year recovering from a concussion. He’s missed 26 straight games and the Blues miss his offensive punch in the lineup.

Unfortunately for Steen, his recovery isn’t seeing any stark improvements and he’s champing at the bit to find a way to get healthy. As Jeremy Rutherford of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports, Steen will be heading to California to get the same kind of treatment Paul Kariya had for his concussion problems.

“I’m trying to get myself back on track here,” Steen said. “It’s hard to explain what I’m going through. I … don’t want to get into too many details about it, but it’s been on and off. I’ve tried everything in my power to get back on the ice.

“So, I’ll be heading (to California) and (be) leaving the team and leaving St. Louis for a couple of weeks.”

This doesn’t sound very promising for Steen with how he’s doing. Going away for two weeks to see if he can get things figured out is a good step. As for banking on Steen coming back to the help the Blues in the playoffs, that would be a risky proposition.

We know that concussions are tough to figure out and considering he’s going to the same place Kariya was treated, that sounds foreboding. Here’s to hoping it works out better for Steen than it did for Kariya.

Andy McDonald becomes the NHL’s latest concussion victim

St. Louis Blues GM Doug Armstrong announced today that Andy McDonald has been placed on injured reserve due to a concussion suffered during the Blues’ Oct. 13 game versus Dallas. McDonald’s head hit the glass after getting checked into the boards by the Stars’ Vern Fiddler at the end of the second period, but he did come back in the third for what would be his final shift of the evening.

This is McDonald’s second concussion in less than a year.

With the injury, McDonald joins a laundry list of NHLers currently out with a concussion or related symptoms — the others Marc Savard, Raitis Ivanans, Ben Smith, Ben Eager, Francis Bouillon, Rick DiPietro, Marc Staal, Ian Laperriere, Kurt Sauer, Nick Petersen, Tyler Kennedy, fellow Blues teammate David Perron and the most high-profile of them all, Sidney Crosby.

(NB: Should be mentioned on TSN’s injury report, these are the only ones listed under “concussion”. Several others — including Adam McQuaid, Jochen Hecht, Mark Olver, Peter Mueller, Michal Rozsival and Jay Beagle — are filed under the always-curious “head” category.)

It’s also another concussion for St. Louis, a team that’s seen a lot of them recently. Concussions forced Paul Kariya to retire this past summer and took all but 10 games away from Perron last season (who is now skating and hoping to join the Blues soon). Defenseman Carlo Colaiacovo is also out with what’s being classified as an “upper body injury” but his symptoms suggest he’s suffering post-concussion issues as well.

Teemu watch: Selanne feeling optimistic about coming back for one more season

3 Comments

While we’re waiting to see what will happen with Teemu Selanne and whether he’ll play again this season or retire, he’s having some fun in southern California and participating in a charity game. In Anaheim, they hold the Fedorin Cup, a game that features a host of former and current NHL’ers playing hockey for charity.

Selanne was there at this year’s game and he was even suiting up and giving it a go on his surgically repaired left knee. While Selanne is hoping to play one more season in the NHL, the one thing that could prevent that from happening is his knee. We’ve heard from Selanne already courtesy of a Finnish TV station blog he wrote saying how he was working out hard to be ready for another season, but still there’s a possibility he might not be able to give it another go. We should know by the time Ducks training camp starts on September 16 what his decision will be.

Randy Youngman of the Orange County Register caught up with Selanne to see which way he’s leaning when it comes to playing next season or retiring. For fans hoping to see Selanne play for one more year, hope is still very much alive.

… He wants one more shot at glory. He was hoping his longtime friend and former linemate, Paul Kariya, would join him for one final season, too, but Kariya decided to retire from the NHL after sitting out the entire 2010-2011 season recovering from concussion symptoms.

“We talked a couple of times and we had lunch with Bob Murray (Ducks GM) to talk about it,” Selanne said. “I was hoping PK could play one more year, but he told me all the stories about the problems he’s had (related to concussions). There are more important things than hockey.”

Selanne knows that, too, but he wants one more tour around the NHL, which this season will include a stop in Winnipeg, where his NHL career began nearly two decades ago.

“I know I don’t really have to play; it’s a ‘gift’ kind of thing,” Selanne said. “But I’m really optimistic about the team we have. We have a chance to do something big here.”

It sounds as if Selanne already has made up his mind about coming back; now he’s waiting for his knee to deliver a second opinion.

Selanne has won just one Stanley Cup in the NHL back in 2007 with the Ducks. Getting a shot to win it one more time before calling it a career, a career that’s seen him score 637 goals, would be the best way to go out with style. With Jonas Hiller being ready to comeback from vertigo and having the reining league MVP ready for another big season in Corey Perry, Selanne is right about the Ducks being a potentially great team.

If Selanne can come back and produce another 30+ goal season and contribute 80 points again, the Ducks could be a team that forces their way into the discussion as potential Stanley Cup finalists with the likes of Vancouver, Chicago, Detroit, and San Jose. A Selanne “victory tour” kind of season that culminates in one more spin around the ice carrying the Cup would be the best way to sending the Finnish Flash off into the sunset.