Tag: Paul Fenton

2014 Coors Light NHL Stadium Series Media Availability

Report: Bruins have reached out to Jeff Gorton for GM role


According to the Boston Herald, the Bruins have contacted the New York Rangers for permission to speak with Jeff Gorton regarding the club’s vacant GM position.

Gorton was the Bruins’ assistant GM when the club drafted Patrice Bergeron, David Krejci, Milan Lucic and Brad Marchand.

He served as the Bruins’ interim GM for three months in 2006 signing free agents Zdeno Chara and Marc Savard. Gorton was also responsible for the Bruins’ acquisition of goaltender Tuukka Rask from the Toronto Maple Leafs for Andrew Raycroft prior to being replaced by Peter Chiarelli.

On Saturday Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman reported that the Bruins would interview Ray Shero and Paul Fenton over the next week.

Shero was the GM of the Pittsburgh Penguins from 2006-14. Fenton is currently the assistant GM of the Nashville Predators.

Related: (Report) Toronto approached Chiarelli before he took Oilers job

HOF columnist says Botterill tops Pens GM candidate list


The Pittsburgh Penguins search for a new general manager continues on and while the list of candidates is pretty well known at this point, but figuring out who has the edge for the job is tricky.

There’s not a lot of talk coming out of Pittsburgh about the direction things are headed as Penguins brass including Mario Lemieux, Joe Burkel, and David Morehouse are keeping mum.

All that means is there’s plenty of speculation to go around. Hall of Fame writer Dave Molinari of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette has about as much credibility as anyone regarding the team and he ranked the top five candidates for the position.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, Penguins assistant GM Jason Botterill was his top choice.

“Sometimes, the best answer is the most obvious one, and that might well be the case here. Botterill was Shero’s assistant and has handled every conceivable duty, from negotiating contracts to evaluating free agents, during five seasons in that role. He is regarded as one of the top young front-office talents in the league, and it’s a given that he will be a general manager sometime soon. There appears to be no good reason that it shouldn’t happen now. Here.”

As for the rest of his top five, Lightning assistant GM Julien BriseBois came in second, Predators assistant GM Paul Fenton was third, NBC Sports’ Pierre McGuire fourth, and fellow Pens assistant GM Tom Fitzgerald fifth.

The common thread with that group is none of them have been in the top GM position before. All five are or have been assistant GMs. Pittsburgh looking for some new blood at the executive ranks may seem like a curious move, but a fresh set of eyes can do a lot of good.

Have the Capitals already zeroed in on their next GM?

Ted Leonsis

The Washington Capitals reportedly are close to locking down former Nashville Predators coach Barry Trotz as their new bench boss, but the team still doesn’t have a new general manager.

As these types of situations go, hiring a new coach before a new GM is in place would be a rare move, but as Elliotte Friedman of CBC points out, the Capitals and owner Ted Leonsis have their field narrowed down and may have their man right under their nose.

The Capitals have talked to or interviewed around 10 people for the position including former GMs Craig Button, Jay Feaster, and Darcy Regier as well as Preds assistant GM Paul Fenton and Bruins assistant GM Don Sweeney.

The most curious one is Capitals assistant GM Brian MacLellan and he’s the guy Friedman hints could be the top choice.

“According to several sources, the current assistant GM was involved in the Trotz interviews and helped show him around the U.S. capital. It is unlikely someone on the way out would be so heavily involved. When this process started, his hiring would be a surprise. Not anymore.”

Promoting MacLellan, who was former GM George McPhee’s assistant, would be a curious move. After 17 years with the Caps, McPhee was fired along with coach Adam Oates on April 26. One advantage MacLellan has going for him right away, as Chuck Gormley of CSNWashington.com points out, is he has history with Trotz.

After names like Ray Shero and Mike Gillis have also popped up in the discussion, keeping the hiring in-house like this would raise some questions as to what kind of change will come about  in trying to make the Caps a Stanley Cup contender. With a big hiring like this, the Caps can’t afford a misstep.

So… Who replaces McPhee in Washington?

Ted Leonsis

Washington Capitals owner Ted Leonsis (pictured) has some big decisions to make now that he’s not bringing back now former general manager George McPhee.

Finding a new GM is something the Capitals haven’t had to do since 1997 when McPhee was brought in and, fortunately for Leonsis, there are a lot of qualified people to choose from.

CSNWashington.com’s Chuck Gormley ran down a list of names that immediately jumped to mind. Gormley’s list includes some names that came up during the Buffalo Sabres’ search for a new GM including Boston Bruins assistant GM Jim Benning and Nashville Predators assistant GM Paul Fenton. Former Vancouver Canucks GM Mike Gillis is a curious name as is Tampa Bay Lightning assistant GM Julien Brisebois.

We ran down a list of other names when we took a look at who might be up for the Canucks GM position. Ones that stand out there include Canucks “capologist” Laurence Gilman, Pittsburgh Penguins assistant GM Jason Botterill, and San Jose Sharks assistant GM Joe Will.

One name to keep an eye on? Phoenix Coyotes assistant GM Brad Treliving. Treliving was also in on the Sabres job that ultimately went to Tim Murray and he along with Benning were virtual finalists for that position.

Don Maloney has done a great job with the Coyotes and Treliving’s experience working with him could provide the sort of blueprint Leonsis is looking for in Washington.

Nashville extends GM Poile, assistant Fenton

2007 NHL Entry Draft Rounds 2-7

The Nashville Predators made six of the last seven postseasons and won their first-ever playoff round with a team built around defense and goaltending.

Today, the team rewarded the chief architects.

The Predators have announced that David Poile — the only GM in franchise history — and assistant Paul Fenton have been extended through the 2014-15 season.

“Today’s announcement is further recognition by the Predators’ ownership group of the outstanding job David has done as President of Hockey Operations since the franchise’s inception,” Nashville chairman Tom Cigarran said. “The consistent success of the Predators on the ice is directly attributed to his ability to assemble and lead a team of management, coaches, scouts and administrators who continually identify, draft, develop and motive an exceptional group of experienced and young players.

“The ownership group believes that under his leadership, the Nashville Predators will soon achieve its goal of winning the Stanley Cup.”

The extensions follow in a series of bold, statement-making moves from the Preds. They already handed out the biggest contract in franchise history (Pekka Rinne’s seven-year, $49 million deal) and bucked up big for Montreal’s Hal Gill, prompting ESPN’s Pierre LeBrun to write the following:

Make no mistake about Friday’s trade, it’s another subtle message from Poile to his two studs [Ryan Suter and Shea Weber] that the Preds are committed to going for it. This year and beyond.

Extending Poile says “this is our guy, we believe in the direction he’s taking us,” while retaining Fenton is about keeping quality people within the organization. Fenton is considered one of hockey’s top assistant GMs and is from the Poile managerial tree — the same place where current Pens GM Ray Shero came from.

“Paul’s vast experience in the game, from playing at the NHL level to scouting and evaluation, combine to make him an integral and invaluable member of our organization,” Poile said. “We’re thrilled that he will continue to play a key role in our hockey operations.”

On that note, check out this glowing Fenton profile from Jonathan Willis of the Edmonton Journal.