Tag: Pat Quinn


Video: Canucks pay tribute to Pat Quinn


The Vancouver Canucks celebrated the life and legacy of Pat Quinn during their St. Patrick’s Day game against the Philadelphia Flyers at Rogers Arena on Tuesday night.

The club’s anthem singer sang a rendition of “When Irish eyes are smiling”.

Flyers’ captain Claude Giroux along with Canucks’ captain Henrik Sedin participated in a ceremonial face-off with Quinn’s family dropping the puck.

Prior to the in-arena tribute, the Canucks unveiled “Pat Quinn Way” outside Rogers Arena.

PHT’s top 14 of ’14: Quinn, Beliveau pass away

Jean Beliveau

In an eleven-day span, the hockey world mourned the loss of two iconic figures — legendary player, coach and executive Pat Quinn passed away on Nov. 23 at the age of 71 and, just over a week later, Montreal Canadiens icon Jean Beliveau died at the age of 83.

Beliveau spent parts of 20 seasons with the Canadiens winning 10 Stanley Cups. He added seven more Championship rings as a member of the club’s management team.

In total, Beliveau appeared in 1,125 games scoring 507 goals and 1,219 points while winning the Art Ross Trophy (1956), Conn Smythe (1965) and the Hart Trophy (1956 and 1964).

Beliveau retired following the 1970-71 season as the franchise leader in points, second in goals and the NHL’s all-time leading playoff scorer. He had his No. 4 raised to the rafters at the Montreal Forum on October 9, 1971.

Quinn broke into the NHL as a player during the 1968-69 season and appeared in 606 games with the Toronto Maple Leafs, Vancouver Canucks and Atlanta Flames. One of his most memorable moments as a player came during the 1969 playoffs, when he ran over Bruins’ legend Bobby Orr.

Quinn was forced to retire in 1977 due to an ankle injury but wasted little time getting back into the game, joining the Philadelphia Flyers as an assistant coach that same year.

During his first full season as head coach of the Flyers, 1979-80, Quinn led the team to a Stanley Cup final appearance where they were defeated in six games by the New York Islanders. After a stop in L.A., Quinn took a coaching job with the Vancouver Canucks where he led the club to a Stanley Cup final appearance in 1994. Quinn’s coaching career also landed him behind the bench in Toronto and Edmonton.

Internationally, Quinn coached Team Canada to a gold medal victory at the 2002 Olympics and won the World Cup in 2004. He also coached Canada to gold medal victories at the U-18 World Championship in 2008 and the U-20 World Junior Championship in 2009.

Tributes for both men came pouring in shortly after they passed.

Several of the organizations Quinn was involved wore a ‘PQ’ decal on their helmets, and the Canucks paid tribute with an emotional pre-game ceremony on Nov. 25th.

Beliveau’s body lie in state at the Bell Centre in Montreal over the weekend of Dec. 6-7 prior to his funeral on Dec. 10. Before the Canadiens’ 3-1 win over the Vancouver Canucks Dec. 9, the team honored their longest serving captain with an emotional ceremony of their own.

Video: Canucks honor Quinn with “O Danny Boy”


The Vancouver Canucks paid tribute to former player and coach Pat Quinn prior to puck drop against the New Jersey Devils.

Quinn spent two seasons with the Canucks as a player and returned to Vancouver to coach for five seasons.

The Ontario native also served as President and General Manager during his time in Vancouver. Quinn led the Canucks to a Stanley Cup final appearance in 1994 and was inducted into the team’s Ring of Honor in April.

Canucks’ anthem singer Mark Donnelly sang a rendition of “O Danny Boy” as part of the tribute.

Quinn passed away on Sunday in Vancouver at the age of 71.

Pat Quinn on coaching again: “I think I still have something to offer”

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One of hockey’s most decorated coaches is thinking about getting back in the game.

Pat Quinn, fourth on the list of all-time coaching victories, told Wayne Scanlan of The National Post he’d be willing to get back behind the bench if an opportunity arose.

“When it’s your life and suddenly it’s not there, it’s a big hole,” he said. “I’d love to be involved with some team some place. I think I still have something to offer. I don’t know what level…coaching always appealed to me, but I’m experienced in other areas.”

Quinn was asked about a coaching return after four NHL bench bosses — Davis Payne, Bruce Boudreau, Paul Maurice and Randy Carlyle — were fired before Dec.1. There have now been more than two dozen coaches fired since the lockout ended in 2005, reaffirming the old “hired to be fired” cliche.

“Having been in the profession, you don’t like to see it, you know how hard these men work,” Quinn said. “When you put your own sweat and blood in there, then you feel something about the organization and the city and the fans.”

So, could Quinn seriously come back? Yes and no. He has a wealth of experience and success (he’s coached in three Stanley Cup finals, Olympics, World Cup, Junior and U-18 World Championships) and probably forgotten more about hockey than most will ever know.

But with experience comes age, and the 68-year-old Quinn might not be up to the rigors of an NHL schedule. Terry Murray, 61, is the league’s oldest head coach; 59-year-olds Jacques Martin and Ken Hitchcock are the second-oldest.

The idea is intriguing, though. Adding to the intrigue is that Quinn’s currently unemployed after being a Senior Adviser in Edmonton last season — well, sorta unemployed. The Big Irishman will be an honorary head coach for the Flyers at the 2012 Bridgestone Winter Classic alumni game, to be played on Dec. 31.

Coaches-in-waiting most likely to land next open NHL job

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In the last few days, we discussed Ron Wilson’s shaky hold on the Toronto Maple Leafs coaching position and also analyzed the danger Scott Gordon, John MacLean, Lindy Ruff and Randy Carlyle might be in.

(It seems like Carlyle is safe for the moment, but at the time, he was in serious trouble.)

Yet with all that analysis and speculation, we haven’t spoken much about the coaches who might replace them.

ESPN’s Scott Burnside took a look at some of the leading candidates for a potential job opening today. Here is a snippet.

We have to start with Ken Hitchcock. His résumé includes a Stanley Cup in Dallas and two Olympic gold medals as an assistant in 2002 and 2010. While offense isn’t necessarily his forte, he’s tactically terrific and defensively among the best. And he’s got instant credibility for teams looking for just that.

Hitchcock seems like a natural fit for the New Jersey Devils, a historically defensive-minded franchise mostly stocked with veteran players. He might still get under some players’ skin, but maybe that’s a good thing?

Running a close second will be Michel Therrien and Bob Hartley. We put the two French Canadian coaches together not just because they’re long-time pals, but because they bring a measure of old-school “beat them in the alley” mentality with their top organizational skills.

Therrien seems like a good “transitional” coach – he helped the Pittsburgh Penguins grow from cellar dwellers to legitimate contenders – while Hartley owns a Cup. I’m not sure if Hartley is that special, though. He almost seemed like a hockey world answer to Barry Switzer in that it seemed like anyone could help that talent-rich Colorado Avalanche team win a Cup.

In the minors, what about Don Lever, who won an AHL championship in Hamilton and is now coaching the AHL Chicago Wolves? He’s had NHL experience as an assistant for many years.

And then there’s longtime NHLer Kevin Dineen, who was thought to be in line for the Columbus job, but whom many believe deserves a shot at a head-coaching gig. He’s currently the coach in Portland of the AHL.

Burnside also mentioned Craig MacTavish, but I’d like to throw two other names in the hat: Pat Quinn (pictured, on the left) and former St. Louis Blues coach Andy Murray. I already discussed the 66-year-old Quinn’s uphill battle to return to the coaching ranks, but Murray could be a nice fit with the right team.

I could see Murray helping anyone from a scrappy team like the Islanders, a mixed bag like Buffalo or even a defensively porous team like the Devils. He might even be the second best option behind Hitchcock.

Finally, the last coach to come to mind is Ted Nolan. He might not be an easy guy to work with, but he got a lot out of most of the teams he coached.

Anyway, who do you think would be a good fit for a team that might make a coaching change soon? Let us know in the comments.