Tag: oxycodone

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Mike Richards’ case pushed back to December


A lawyer appeared in court on Mike Richards’ behalf on Thursday, and the ultimate result is that his case has been remanded to Dec. 8, according to the Winnipeg Free Press.

No plea was entered regarding charges of possession of a controlled substance (oxycodone).

The incident happened at the Emerson Border Crossing as Richards was entering Canada on June 17, while the arrest itself happened on Aug. 25.

The Los Angeles Kings terminated his contract on June 29, citing a “material breach.” The NHLPA filed a grievance on the 30-year-old forward’s behalf, though a date hasn’t yet been set for that to come to a conclusion.

Much like the cases of Patrick Kane, Ryan O'Reilly and Slava Voynov, there are still things to clarify. Richards’ situation is different in at least one way, however, as he currently isn’t technically under an NHL contract.

PHT will provide updates regarding Richards whenever they may come.

Aaron Boogaard made first appearance in court but did not enter a plea today


Aaron Boogaard fulfilled the first part of his obligations stemming from last week’s charges related to his involvement in his brother Derek Boogaard’s prescription drug-related death by appearing in Minneapolis court today. Aaron didn’t enter a plea during that first Monday court date, according to the Associated Press.

Aaron Boogaard is accused of providing the painkillers that ultimately contributed to his brother’s death. (Derek died because of a toxic mixture of oxycodone and alcohol). Aaron is also being charged with flushing the remaining non-prescribed pills down the toilet between the time he called about Derek’s death and when authorities arrived at the two brothers’ apartment. That amounts to a felony charge for drug possession (“third degree sale of a controlled substance”) and a gross misdemeanor for “interference with a death.”

The Associated Press report indicates that Minnesota state guidelines recommend a sentence of 21 months of probation. Here is a little bit more from that AP report.

Aaron Boogaard remains free on bail but must avoid alcohol and non-prescribed drugs. Neither he nor his attorney, John Lundquist, commented on the charges after the hearing. Lundquist last week said they would address the allegations in court rather than in the media, and that his client is devastated by his brother’s death.

Lundquist did explain Monday why immigration officials put a hold on his Canadian client after his arrest last week. He said the visa that lets Boogaard play hockey in the U.S. doesn’t extend to the offseason, and that it’s a common problem among players.

Aaron Boogaard’s next court date is on August 17. We’ll keep you updated about this sad situation.

Aaron Boogaard receives two charges related to Derek Boogaard’s death


Upon hearing news that Aaron Boogaard was arrested on prescription fraud and drug possession charges on Wednesday, his family implied that those charges weren’t related to the May 13 death of his brother, former NHL enforcer Derek Boogaard. It was hard to believe that Aaron’s charges weren’t in some way related to Derek’s death (which resulted from a toxic mixture of oxycodone and alcohol) and an updated report from the Minnesota Star-Tribune clarifies that there might have been a connection.

Paul Walsh reports that Aaron received two charges. The first is that he was in control of the painkillers that ultimately lead to his brother’s death. The other is for allegedly flushing the remaining pills down the toilet between the time he called about Derek’s death and the time authorities arrived. Here is a more literal explanation of the two charges filed today.

1. “Third degree sale of a controlled substance” – if convicted, it would be a felony.

2. “Interference with a death” – which would be a gross misdemeanor if convicted.

Here’s a bit more from Walsh’s report.

Aaron routinely supplied his brother with drugs, and “it is our understanding that Aaron kept his brother’s non-prescribed, illegal drugs and attempted to parcel them out on some kind of limited basis,” said County Attorney Mike Freeman.

“It’s a tragic situation,” Freeman added. “The family has already suffered significant loss. That doesn’t diminish the fact that it’s wrong — and in this case it was tragic — for him to give him that drug.”

A toxicologist found traces of Percocet, OxyContin and oxycodone along with alcohol in Derek Boogaard’s body, making it difficult to say which substance killed him. That’s the only reason, Freeman said, that Aaron Boogaard wasn’t charged with murder or manslaughter.

Derek died at the age of 28 and now Aaron – a 24-year old sixth round pick (175th overall) by the Minnesota Wild in 2004 – might not just see the potential conclusion of his hockey career, but also the possibility of serious legal ramifications for his role in this unfortunate incident. The saddest part might be that the incident reportedly happened the day after Derek left treatment for the very substance abuse problems that ended his life. One can only imagine how the Boogaard family must be going through right now.

Here is a statement from Boogaard’s attorneys, via Michael Russo.

“We are pleased that Aaron Boogaard is with his family, having been released from custody by both Hennepin County and U.S. immigration authorities. We will address the allegations in court rather than in the media, but note that Aaron was and remains devastated by his brother’s death. The entire Boogaard family has suffered tremendous loss and we ask that you respect their privacy as they continue to mourn the death of Derek.”

Meanwhile, the top prosecutor on the case said that Aaron Boogaard “should have known better” than to give his brother narcotics the day after he finished a rehab session.

Walsh reports that Aaron posted bail on Friday afternoon and will reportedly appear in district court on Monday. We’ll let you know what happens in this very sad situation.

Click here for more information about the complaint and some video related to the charges.

Derek Boogaard died due to toxic mixture of alcohol, oxycodone


The hockey world mourned the death of New York Rangers enforcer Derek Boogaard last Friday, whose passing blindsided people because he was just 28 years old. There was some speculation that an extensive history of concussions factored into his death, but it appears that was not the case. Michael Russo reports that Boogaard died from a toxic mixture of alcohol and oxycodone. (Oxycodone is a narcotic substance often used as a pain-killer for moderate to severe symptoms.)

It’s a sad story, no doubt, but hopefully fans will remember Boogaard for his charitable efforts and sense of humor rather than the way he died.

If you’d like to read more about Boogaard, here’s a collection of PHT content on the feared fighter.

Update: Boogaard’s family released the following statement through the NHL Players Association.

“We would like to express our appreciation for the outpouring of love and support for our family during this difficult period as we grieve the loss of Derek – our son and brother.   We are deeply saddened by this unimaginable loss, but we are grateful for the expression of support that has given us strength as we go through this tragic time.

It is very comforting for our family to know that, while Derek’s life was far too short, he had a great impact on many people who he came into contact with.  We are proud that Derek was able to live his boyhood dream to play in the National Hockey League. We are even more proud of the fact that Derek was dedicated to making a difference in his adopted communities of Minnesota and New York City, through his countless hours of charitable work.

Earlier today, we received the results of Derek’s toxicology report at the time of his accidental death.  After repeated courageous attempts at rehabilitation and with the full support of the New York Rangers, the NHLPA, and the NHL, Derek had been showing tremendous improvement but was ultimately unable to beat this opponent.  While he played and lived with pain for many years, his passion for the game, his teammates, and his community work was unstoppable.

Our family would like to like to thank the New York Rangers, the Minnesota Wild, the National Hockey League Players’ Association, and the National Hockey League for supporting Derek’s continued efforts in his battle.

Derek will be greatly missed and will never be forgotten by his fans, friends, and teammates, and especially by us – his family. We respectfully ask for continued privacy as we grieve the loss of Derek.”