Tag: Ottawa Senators


Calder runner-up Stone says injured wrist is ‘100 percent’


It’s been a pretty good summer for breakout Sens forward Mark Stone.

He finished second to Aaron Ekblad as the NHL’s top rookie, scored a three-year, $10.5 million extension from the Sens and, this week, confirmed there’s no lingering effect from the P.K. Subban slash he took to the wrist during Ottawa’s opening-round playoff loss to Montreal.

“It’s felt great out there the last couple of skates,” he told the Ottawa Sun. “The shot feels good. The hands feel good. My legs are starting to come along. I feel good and I feel like I’m 100 percent.”

That wasn’t the case this spring, when Stone suffered a microfracture from the Subban slash — an incident that set off a mini-firestorm between two clubs. Following the series, which the Habs won four games to two, Stone expressed frustration over how much the injury — which occurred in the second period of Game 1 — limited him.

Stone played through the injury, but needed to freeze his wrist before and sometimes again during each game.

“It was just frustrating not being able to feel parts of my wrist and parts of my fingers,” he explained. “It definitely didn’t help my shot, but I was able to play through it.”

Now healthy, Stone can focus on two major tasks — getting Ottawa back into the playoffs, and avoiding the dreaded sophomore slump.

Erik Karlsson has an interesting take on (not) training

Erik Karlsson

After years of working hard in the weight room during each off-season, Ottawa Senators defenseman Erik Karlsson realized that it made more sense for him to take a different approach.

TSN shared video of his discussion with reporters, which provided candid insight on his viewpoints regarding getting prepared for a coming season.

“I do all my conditioning on the ice. I don’t do any conditioning during the summer,” Karlsson said Tuesday. “My issue has always been keeping weight on and trying to get bigger and stronger and if I do that throughout the summer as well, I can’t put any weight on and keep it on during the year.”

It’s strange to hear Karlsson – still just 25 – discuss how he’s adapted his regimen compared to when he was younger. Then again, maybe the Swedish defenseman simply knows his body that well, and perhaps even understands how quickly things can change for NHL athletes.

It certainly doesn’t seem like fitness is an issue for him. He generated 21 goals and 66 points in 2014-15, taking home the second Norris Trophy of his career.

Karlsson also didn’t see a dip in ice time, as he came in a little past 27 minutes per game (27:15) for the third straight season.

It’s not exactly as if he’s loafing out there, as he uses his exceptional skating ability to lead the rush and dramatically improve Ottawa’s transition game.

Some might point to comments like these when scapegoating – that always seems to happen with a small segment of fandom, doesn’t it? – but it seems like Karlsson probably knows what he’s doing.

(H/T to The Score)

PHT Morning Skate: Habs’ fan calls Max Talbot a disgrace to Quebec

Boston Bruins v Pittsburgh Penguins

PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

Boston forward, and LeMoyne, Quebec native, Max Talbot recently took to the streets of Montreal to ask Habs’ fans what they thought of the Bruins.

Have a look:

According to Scott Burnside, Kris Letang is the Pittsburgh Penguins’ most important player. (ESPN)

If you’re a Coyotes’ fan living in Arizona, you can now purchase Coyotes’ license plates. (Arizona Coyotes)

Veteran Ottawa Senators’ defenseman Chris Phillips pondered retirement following back surgery. (Ottawa Sun)

Dmitrij Jaskin and Petteri Lindbohm are preparing for bigger roles with Blues this season. (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

Under Pressure: John Carlson

John Carlson, Nicklas Backstrom

We wrote yesterday about how most teams that win the Stanley Cup have an elite center, like Jonathan Toews.

Well, most teams that win the Cup also have an elite defenseman, like Duncan Keith, the 2015 Conn Smythe Trophy winner.

Can John Carlson be that guy for the Washington Capitals?

The 25-year-old is coming off his best season as a professional. In 82 games, he had 12 goals and 43 assists, his 55 points ranking fifth among NHL defensemen, behind only Erik Karlsson, Brent Burns, P.K. Subban and Dennis Wideman.

And with the departure of Mike Green, the Caps will need Carlson more than ever to provide offense from the back end, while also continuing to improve in all the other areas of his game.

“I think with Carly, there’s been areas of his game that sort of would lag, and I think he’s done a really good job of focusing on those areas, so he can have that consistency,” coach Barry Trotz said in February, per the Washington Post. “He’s maturing as a player. He’s still a very young player who’s now entering the front end of the prime of his career. There’s lot of good things to see from him.”

Related: ‘It took him a few years, but Victor Hedman’s arrived’

Senators and the ‘sophomore slump’

1500809 senators

As exhilarating as it may be to nail that debut album, expectations only build for the follow-up.

Let’s take a look at key Ottawa Senators trying to avoid the sports version of one-hit wonder status.

Dave Cameron – Plenty of coaches burst onto the NHL scene only to hit a snag after that “new car smell” wears off. (Guy Boucher is sadly nodding.)

Cameron produced dramatic results after taking over in Ottawa, most notably finishing last season with a 23-4-4 run to make the playoffs. Cameron received a contract extension for his work – and his role in the turnaround cannot be denied – but now he’s being asked to make lightning strike twice.

Unless, of course, this group is for real.

Andrew Hammond – Naturally, it’s no coincidence that the Senators were red-hot at the same moment that “The Hamburglar” became a secret sauce sensation.

The 27-year-old made history and a ridiculous amount of stops, going 20-1-2 with a remarkable .941 save percentage. Hammond may be at the greatest risk of a huge dive in production, as nothing about his numbers at lower levels really predicted a breakthrough.

Actually, Craig Anderson being the probable No. 1 guy could go a long way in helping Hammond ease into life as a full-time NHL goalie.

Mark Stone – The sixth-rounder (178th overall in 2010) seemed to swap bodies with another player when 2014 turned to 2015.

In 34 contests from October through December, Stone managed 8 goals and 17 points. From January to the end of the regular season, he scored 18 goals and 47 points in 46 games.

One can expect the 23-year-old to cool off a bit, as his 16.6 shooting percentage should subside. The key question is “How much?”

Mike Hoffman – His production came more steadily than Stone’s, yet the 25-year-old’s in largely the same situation. Both saw big upswings in their numbers, each has a bit more than 100 regular season games under their belts, and they likely should enjoy space to grow under Cameron.

It’s reasonable to anticipate a moderate dip, although his more consistent production (and a more moderate 13.6 shooting percentage) imply that he could be pretty reliable.


Here’s the thing: all four Senators sophomores are vulnerable to a slump, especially in the eyes of those with sky-high expectations. On the flip side, those who give them a little room to breathe may find that the team made some lasting discoveries during that astounding run.