Tag: officiating

Dave Tippett

Tippett on officiating: “If I told you what I really thought it would cost me a lot of money”


Overcoming a third period deficit is already tough for an offense as limited as the Phoenix Coyotes’ but killing three power plays during the third period didn’t exactly help matters. Coyotes coach Dave Tippett – sort of – didn’t take the bait when asked about some questionable calls following Phoenix’s 2-1 loss to the Los Angeles Kings.

“If I told you what I really thought it would cost me a lot of money,” Tippett said. “The game is turning a little dishonest [when it comes to] embellishment by the players. When it’s done well, it’s very hard for the referees. If you fall down by the boards, if you drop your stick or throw your head back you put the refs in a hard position … it makes the game dishonest.”

He didn’t go into exact detail, yet Tippett did say a few things that might get him a fine right there. Tippett also partially blamed penalties for Phoenix’s lack of offense, as they only managed four shots on goal in the third period.

Third period calls

One could argue that Oliver Ekman-Larsson shouldn’t have been the only one who received a penalty when he was whistled for cross-checking. Many probably didn’t like that Shane Doan and Drew Doughty received matching penalties and Brian Engblom objected to a Radim Vrbata slashing call in the game’s last minute.

Sutter’s response

When asked about the embellishments, Sutter’s response was simple.

“I didn’t see it,” Sutter said. “We didn’t complain last game.”

Perhaps that has something to do with that whole “winning” thing, but Sutter’s been pretty fair with his reactions. He didn’t make a big stink about the Shane Doan boarding hit on Trevor Lewis, for example.


So how big of a factor were the calls? Did refs make the wrong ones? Is Tippett out of line for making these comments? Share your thoughts.

Here are your Kings-Coyotes Game 1 officials


The Los Angeles Kings and Phoenix Coyotes aren’t likely to light up the lamp on the power play all that often in the Western Conference finals – perhaps on each others’ power plays – but officiating can still make a big impact. With that in mind, here are the officials for Game 1 of the 2012 Western Conference finals, via Rich Hammond.

Referees: Kevin Pollock (not to be confused with Kevin Pollak) and Brad Watson (who must deal with a lot of Sherlock Holmes jokes and is featured in this post’s main image).
Linesmen: Shane Heyer and Jay Sharrers

Refs miss too many men on ice call before Coyotes’ 1-1 goal


On Wednesday, Danny Briere’s offside goal helped to turn around what was once a 3-0 deficit into a 4-1 OT win for the Philadelphia Flyers. It’s too early to tell what kind of impact Thursday’s controversial missed-call-turned-goal might have, but it appears that the Phoenix Coyotes were spared a too many men on the ice penalty before tying things up against the Chicago Blackhawks tonight.

This video is no longer available. Click here to watch more NBC Sports videos!

The Coyotes now lead 2-1 early in the third period, so this could be another blown call that the NHL will eventually apologize about. How do you feel about it, though?

Boston looks to lock up Stanley Cup finals berth while Tampa Bay looks for Game 7

Tampa Bay Lightning v Boston Bruins - Game Five

It’s a do-or-die Game 6 for Tampa Bay at home against Boston. Tampa Bay can stave off elimination for a day and force a Game 7 on Friday night with a win tonight over the Bruins but the Bruins will be looking to put an end to things early and clinch their first spot in the Stanley Cup finals since 1990.

Boston @ Tampa Bay – 8 p.m. ET (Versus)Boston leads series 3-2

While the Bruins lineup will hold strong and play out the same way as it has the last few games, things in Tampa Bay are getting shuffled up a bit from Game 5. Dwayne Roloson will once again be back in goal to start for the Lightning after getting a day off in Game 5. In Game 5, Mike Smith played well in spite of losing giving up a pair of goals in a 3-1 Bruins win.

Some thought it might be the start of a goalie controversy but coach Guy Boucher put that talk to a stop quickly saying Roloson would get the start in Game 6 after “getting a rest” in Game 5. A curious decision nonetheless, but if Roloson slams the door shut tonight and helps Tampa Bay force a Game 7, the adulation for Boucher will grow stronger.

The other intrigue for Tampa Bay in their lineup is whether or not Sean Bergenheim will play tonight. Bergenheim left Game 5 with an injury and did not return and Boucher says it will be a game time decision whether or not he plays. If Bergenheim sits, it’ll be either forward Dana Tyrell or defenseman Randy Jones playing in his spot.

One matter to keep an eye on tonight is how the penalties shake out as referee Eric Furlatt gets to call tonight’s game and he hasn’t exactly been very Lightning-friendly through the playoffs calling 24 penalties against them and only nine against Tampa’s opponents. Guy Boucher says he’s “very aware” of the discrepancy and broke out some of his own gamesmanship this afternoon when asked about it.

For Boston, the key for them is to jump out on the Lightning early and get a goal to both put the Lightning back on their heels and to quiet down the crowd. Boston’s been great when grabbing leads early (Game 4 aside) and doing so again tonight would test the Lightning’s willingness to snap out of it and fight back yet again. The Lightning aren’t ones to show much quit but it demands that the Bruins play hard and stay aggressive for all 60 minutes. If they do that and get great play out of Zdeno Chara and Tim Thomas yet again, they could be shaking hands at the end of tonight’s game.

For more analysis on tonight’s game, check out what Keith Jones and Mike Milbury had to say about things earlier today.

Blue Jackets fans say ref gave them the finger, made ‘crying gesture’


It’s tough not to sympathize with NHL referees sometimes. Sure, it’s frustrating when they make a marginal or downright incorrect call – especially when it’s against your team, which clearly makes that guy a conspirator – but it’s a thankless job that must be harder than it looks to outsiders.

Still, those men in striped uniforms are human, after all. Sometimes they hold foolish grudges against players (allegedly), getting in gambling trouble like the NBA’s Tim Donaghy or even get into spats with fans. Sometimes heckling can get under your skin, and if Blue Jackets fans are telling the truth, that’s exactly what happened last night.

Aaron Portzline of the Columbus Post-Dispatch reports that Blue Jackets fans in section 109 claim NHL referee Paul Devorski made a “scratching motion” on his chin with his middle finger* and a crying gesture toward them during the third period of Monday’s game against the Minnesota Wild. The fans had been giving Devorski “grief” for what they felt was a missed high sticking call.

* – I prefer the forehead scratch, personally, but to each his own.

Portzline writes that 15 fans informed the newspaper regarding the situation via e-mail or Twitter. Devorski denied the claims, NHL director of officiating Terry Gregson said the league is investigating the matter and head disciplinarian Colin Campbell provided no comment regarding the incident.

Apparently fans were “on edge” all night, in part because the Wild received seven power play opportunities while the Blue Jackets had none.

“Two guys in front of us started giving the refs (grief) after they clearly missed a call,” said Ritter Hoy, who was seated five rows up from the glass in section 109. “Happens at every game, right?

“Well, the No. 10 official put his fingers up and rubbed his eyes and made a crying face, like ‘what are you going to do, cry?’ They started giving him more (grief) and he put his middle finger up to his chin and acted like he was scratching his face. It was very, very blatant. The whole section saw it and went crazy.”

No. 10 is Devorski, a 21-year NHL official who is one of the most respected officials in the business. Devorski has worked Stanley Cups since the 2001 season and the last two Olympics, including the bronze medal game in 2010 and the gold medal game in 2006. This would seem out of his character.

The crowd’s reaction last night was audible, even from the press box. I heard it and so did the two traveling writers who cover the Wild, but the reason for the disturbance was not immediately clear. Fans were on edge most of the night, because the Wild had seven power plays, while the Blue Jackets had none.

My guess is that nothing much beyond a funny story will likely come out of this, but if something does happen – from a fine, suspension or other discipline via the league – we’ll let you know.

If nothing else, it’s a testament to the fine art of heckling. Well done, Section 109.