Tag: off-season workouts

Vancouver Canucks v Chicago Blackhawks - Game Four

Blackhawks hope that Dave Bolland can produce his best (and healthiest) regular season yet

Stanley Cup champions often have their fair share of unsung heroes and Dave Bolland qualified as one during the Chicago Blackhawks’ impressive 2010 championship run. Bolland hounded top forwards such as Joe Thornton and the Sedin twins while scoring an impressive 16 points in 22 games during the 2010 playoffs, including two big shorthanded goals. He didn’t get Conn Smythe hype, but Bolland did the dirty work to open things up for Chicago’s stars to dominate on the game’s biggest stages.

It seemed like a “coming out party” for the defensive center, but injuries keep stopping him from showing his true value over the long haul. Off-season back surgery limited him just to 37 games during the 2009-10 regular season while concussions issues kept him out for months last season, even forcing him to miss the first three games of Chicago’s up-and-down series with the Vancouver Canucks.

While it’s probably a bit much to attribute the Blackhawks’ near-come back from a 3-0 series deficit to the return of Bolland, he made an undeniable impact from Game 4 and on, tallying six points in four games as the Hawks fell just short of an incredible comeback.

Some might wonder if Bolland simply saves his best for the biggest games, but the fact of the matter is that Blackhawks have only enjoyed one true regular season with the two-way center (a 19-goal, 47-point output in 81 games in 08-09). Bolland and the Blackhawks hope that next season is healthy, breakout campaign for Bolland – and he’s certainly putting in the work to make that happen.

Bolland’s return in Game 4 sparked an impressive comeback from a 3-0 series deficit to force a Game 7 – which the Hawks lost in overtime on a goal by the Canucks’ Alexandre Burrows. It was just enough of a taste to keep Bolland hungry all summer for the upcoming season, which will start with training camp in about three weeks.

“That was probably the worst sports injury I’ve ever had, because some guys say it’s a week or two weeks (out) … and the next thing you know I’m out for a month or a month-and-a-half and we’re in the playoffs,” Bolland said before playing in the recent Blackhawks Alumni Golf Outing at Medinah Country Club. “It was something that really dragged on. For me, going into the season it is motivation after coming out of the Vancouver series and losing. I got a strong series with them and coming into this season will be great.”

Preliminary indications are that he’ll be slotted in a third line, checking center type role. Bolland’s solid defensive play, agitating style and occasionally offensive outbursts make him ideal for that job.

It’s expected that he’ll fall behind Jonathan Toews and Patrick Sharp down the middle, but Joel Quenneville is known for at least two things: singing poorly and mixing up his line combinations on the fly. Bolland might not be ideal as the second center, but there might be times when he’s placed in that spot.

Wherever he shows up, the Blackhawks just hope that he’ll be healthy enough to be out there – which isn’t a guarantee considering his troubles during the last two seasons. Ultimately, the Blackhawks’ goal of rising back to elite contender status might hinge on the health and performances of Bolland and other lesser known contributors.

A big new contract won’t hurt Brooks Laich’s world-class work ethic

Brooks Laich, Chris Drury

Aside from Matt Hendricks’ astounding battle wound, it seemed like the Pittsburgh Penguins came across as the stars during the early parts of HBO’s 24/7 special, which only makes sense since the Washington Capitals were in the middle of one of their worst slumps in years during the beginning. Yet if there was one Washington player who pretty much always came across as a class act, it was hard working center Brooks Laich. (Then again, he already earned great press for helping a troubled motorist, so he’s probably just one of those people who radiate goodness.)

Perhaps the most critical remark you can utter about Laich is that the Capitals probably overpaid him this off-season by signing him to a six-year, $27 million deal. Laich brings plenty of likeable qualities to the table, but a $4.5 million annual cap hit is simply too much for a player at his level.

That being said, if you think that he’s going to rest on his laurels/get fat and happy from his big payday, On Frozen Blog features a story that dispels that notion with aplomb. Elisabeth Meinecke reports that while the Capitals’ off-season workout regime calls for roughly nine hours per week of effort, Laich averages about 24. Laich said that the turning point happened during the versatile center’s second season in the NHL.

Laich wasn’t always this way about his offseason training. In fact, he can pinpoint his obsession with conditioning—he phrases it as “messed up mentally that way”—back to the end of his second year in the NHL. He’d scored 7 and 8 goals in his first and second seasons, respectively. After that second year, he was walking into an ice arena back home when, Laich said, he realized, “I have to do something to separate myself from being a bubble player and try and realize the potential that I believe I have.”

From then on, instead of going into the gym at 9 am, he’d start at 7 am and stay till about 11 am. He’d make sure to be in bed by 9 pm, to the chagrin of friends. The season following that summer, however, Laich scored over 20 goals, and a conditioning junkie was born.

And, in quintessential Brooks Laich fashion, he enjoys it.

“I can’t wait to get to bed at night ‘cause I’m excited to get up …  I’m out of bed at 5:30 in the morning, ready to get to the gym, because I want to push it – I’m 28 years old, I should be entering the prime of my career.  I want to push it and see how good I can get,” Laich says. “Roddie and I sort of developed  a saying over the years, ‘It hurts you so long, you’ll be addicted to pain.’”

Really, the only downside I can see to this regime is that Laich might risk injuries by working too hard. That’s a great problem to have, though, and it’s honestly quite refreshing amid the series of entitlement-soaked stories we’ve been following this week. Maybe the Capitals are overpaying Laich a bit considering his skill level, but if his determination rubs off on teammates, it might be worth the investment.

Gary Roberts discusses his post-NHL career as a strength and conditioning coach


During a trying period between the 1994-95 and 96-97 seasons, Gary Roberts’ career was in serious jeopardy. A bad neck injury forced him to play just eight games in 94-95, 35 in 95-96 and miss the 96-97 season entirely. For many people, that might be enough to call it a career at 30 years old.

Although injuries hounded him for the rest of his playing days, Roberts developed intense training regimens that helped him remain an NHL player until he was 43 years old, spending his final season with the Tampa Bay Lightning in 08-09. (Before that, his intensity and grit made him something of a folk legend with the Pittsburgh Penguins, as the “WWGRD?” movement exploded.)

Roberts’ impressive longevity and training methods have made him a sought-after fitness guru in hockey circles, especially after disciples such as Steven Stamkos and Jeff Skinner raved about his process and went on to have exceptional 2010-11 seasons. The Toronto Sun’s Dave Feschuk spotlights Roberts’ path to become such a well-respected strength and conditioning coach in this story.

Roberts spoke about his own training camp struggle when he was 18 and how he fought back from that neck injury at 30.

“I was a skinny fat guy, that’s who I was. Not only was I skinny and weak, but I had high body fat. So basically I had very little lean muscle mass. I didn’t weight train back then. I certainly didn’t have great nutrition. I was a cardiovascular guy . . . I played hockey. I played lacrosse. I thought I was in great shape at 18 years old. (The Calgary Flames) threw me on a pull-up bar for my first fitness test, and I did 1½ pull-ups. I was pretty embarrassed by that.”


“I realized, after what I went through as a player, making a comeback (from a devastating neck injury at age 30) and playing those extra 13 years, that I was only able to do that through the great advice that I got from friends in the nutrition world, and the strength and fitness world. I wish I had that information when I was 18, 19, 20 years old. To be able to pass that on to these guys, and see the way they’re excelling, it’s gratifying.”

Roberts’ attention to detail – especially when it comes to dietary habits – has become well known. Last summer, Stamkos (jokingly?) said he was worried that he would receive a little heat from Roberts when cameras caught him eating popcorn. There’s a method to that madness, though, as proper training and nutrition can make a significant difference in a punishing league that doesn’t provide much margin for error.

“I’m a little over the top with this stuff, you realize,” he said. “I’ve never done anything half-assed before. And I want these athletes to have the right information. Even if they apply the majority of what I tell them . . . they’re going to be way better off. The only reason I played in the NHL until I was 43 was because of what I did off the ice.”

With all the money teams like the Lightning have invested in players like Stamkos, the hope is that they carry that same level of commitment.

The Dallas Stars probably hope that Roberts has a similar effect on their young players as the team’s player development consultant. (Maybe Jamie Benn will have an easier time retaining his locomotive-like energy over a full season with Roberts whispering in his ear?) From the sounds of things, he might be the fittest man for that job.