Tag: obituaries


Hockey coach charged with fondling teen dies in jail cell


An ugly story took a sad end on Friday. Ukrainian hockey coach Ivan Pravilov was found dead in a jail cell according to The Associated Press.

Officials believe that Pravilov committed suicide, although an official autopsy hasn’t been conducted yet. The hockey coach and trainer was arrested in January for allegedly having sexual contact with a teenage hockey player.* Pravilov reportedly pleaded not guilty to those charges.

Pravilov coached several NHL and college hockey players, including New Jersey Devils center Dainius Zubrus. The Associated Press reports that former hockey player Maxim Starchenko described him as “physically, mentally and sexually abusive” in a book.

Pravilov was 49 years old.

* – The official charge seems to be “traveling for the purpose of engaging in illicit sexual conduct and transporting a person to engage in criminal sexual activity.”

(Image via NBCPhiladelphia.com)

Lokomotiv Yaroslavl plane crash survivor Alexander Galimov dies in Moscow hospital

Alexander Galimov, Liro Tarkki

The Vishnevsky Institute of Surgery announced that Alexander Galimov died at a Moscow hospital on Monday, Sept. 12. The International Ice Hockey Federation confirmed the sad news as many in the hockey world hoped that he might beat the odds and survive that terrible event. He was 26 years old.

Galimov was one of two initial survivors of the horrific plane crash that decimated the KHL team Lokomotiv Yaroslavl on September 7. Galimov had been the only player who survived the crash, with Alexander Sizov being the one crew member who is still alive. Sizov is currently listed in “serious but stable” condition.

Galimov suffered burns to at least 80 percent of his body from the crash. Galimov and Sizov were transported to a Moscow hospital on September 8, where Galimov entered a medically-induced coma. It was revealed that Galimov died during surgery early on Monday. The total number of deaths related to that tragedy is now at 44 people.

“On September 12, in the morning, despite continuting therapy using all possible contemporary treatment, Alexander Galimov died from severe burns in the burn center of the Vishnevsky Institute of Surgery,” the statement said.

Galimov’s hockey career at a glance

Galimov played parts of seven seasons for Lokomotiv Yaroslavl, including seasons before they joined the KHL. Galimov played 341 games overall for the team, scoring 126 points and compiling 280 penalty minutes.

During the last two seasons, Galimov’s playoff performances were significantly better than his regular season outputs. He scored 25 points in 52 regular season games in 2009-10, yet he scored 14 points in 16 playoff games. He maintained a similar pattern last season, scoring 31 points in 53 regular season games before scoring 14 points in 18 postseason contests. Galimov won a silver medal with Russian’s under-20 team at the 2005 World Junior Hockey Championships.


Cam Charron points out a heartbreaking fact: Galimov scored Lokomotiv’s last goal. The hockey world was holding out hope that he would find a way to pull through that tragedy, but now our hearts go out to his family and friends.

Looking back at the legacies of the victims of the Lokomotiv Yaroslavl tragedy

Slovakia v Germany: Group A - 2011 IIHF World Championship

September 7, 2011 will go down as one of the darkest days in hockey history, as at least 43 people died in a horrific plane crash on Wednesday. As you probably know by know, the KHL team Lokomotiv suffered most of the losses. While PHT took a look at how the NHL reacted to the stunning news and how people hope to eventually move on from the tragedy, it seems like a good time to look back on the lives of some of the victims.

(For a full list of the players and team members who were believed to be on board, click here.)

Brad McCrimmon (52 years old): McCrimmon was a former assistant coach with the Red Wings who hoped to advance his coaching career by becoming Lokomotiv’s bench boss in May. He had a distinguished NHL career in which he finished with a +444 rating as a defenseman. (You can read more about his career and life in this story at CSNPhilly.com.) Craig Custance provided these heartfelt words about McCrimmon.

McCrimmon connected with everyone — children, teammates, fans, media. He was an incredible father to his two children and was loved by those he played with — and those who played for him. He was ready to take on his latest challenge in life, and it was easy to see it resulting in a future offer for an NHL job. Mostly because he didn’t just talk of things he learned on the farm — trust, respect, discipline, accountability and sacrifice. He lived it. Just not nearly long enough.

Pavol Demitra (36): Demitra was a three-time All-Star during an NHL career that spanned 16 seasons. Injuries were often a problem for the very skilled Slovakian, but he showed how much of an impact he could make in the 2010 Olympics, scoring 10 points in just seven games to become the tournament’s leading scorer. Michael Russo caught up with Demitra’s agent, who provided this heartbreaking quote.

I just got off the phone with agent Matt Keator, who was with Demitra in Riga, Latvia, three weeks ago and confirmed to me that Demitra sadly was killed: “I just want everybody to know what kind of infectious energy he has, what a wonderful person he was. People were drawn to Demo.”

source: APRuslan Salei (36): Just as recently as last season, Salei was an NHL defenseman with the Detroit Red Wings. The rugged defensemen played 917 regular season games in his NHL career, but many will remember him for his off-beat sense of humor, including his strange craving for a drink that was “half-Pepsi, half-beer.”

Karlis Skrastins (37): The stay-at-home defenseman earned an “Ironman” streak by playing 487 consecutive games, but former PHT editor Brandon Worley remembers him as a warm and inviting person off the ice.

I had the pleasure of meeting Karlis Skrastins last fall. Like many NHL players he was more than willing to stop and chat. I walked away amazed at how humble he was and how quick to smile he was while chatting with me, a genuinely nice guy whose enthusiasm for hockey was infectious. His teammates felt the same way and everyone will remember Karlis as a man who made an impact on their lives just from having known him, how his quiet intensity drove him every night on the ice and his work ethic drove him off it.

Josef Vasicek (30): The Czech-born forward played for the New York Islanders, Nashville Predators and Carolina Hurricanes before moving on to the KHL. His best memories from his seven NHL seasons probably came during the 2006 playoffs when he won a Stanley Cup with Carolina.

Karel Rachunek (32): The former Ottawa Senators, New York Rangers and New Jersey Devils defenseman has been affiliated with Lokomotiv even before the team became a member of the KHL. He was the team’s captain.

Alexander Karpovtsev (41) and Igor Korolev (41): Two former Chicago Blackhawks who served as assistant coaches were also victims of the crash.


Since we couldn’t cover every player and coach who was a victim of this awful accident, here’s a video tribute to the team that hopefully does everyone justice. (H/T to The Royal Half.)

(Various sources were helpful in putting together this post, including these bios from The Associated Press.)