Tag: NHL ’12

Jaroslav Halak, Alex Ovechkin

Halak even torments Ovechkin in video games


When you’re a dazzling goal-scorer on Alex Ovechkin’s level, it’s not often that a goalie has your “number,” so it’s easy to make note of the guys who defy you.

It’s likely that Jaroslav Halak ranks high on Ovechkin’s list. The Slovakian goalie was the main reason that the Montreal Canadiens topped Ovechkin’s Washington Capitals in the 2010 playoffs and Halak also spoiled Dale Hunter’s coaching debut as a member of the St. Louis Blues.

The frustration doesn’t stop in reality, though. The Washington Times’ Stephen Whyno reveals that the digital version of Halak gives Ovechkin fits, too.

“Actually, it’s funny story,” Ovechkin said. “Last night I was with my friend in my home and we play video game and Halak stopped [everything]. Halak was the first star of the day. And my friend just told me, ‘Jesus Christ, this guy just destroy in playoffs.’ I don’t want to talk about it.”

(Hopefully Halak’s performance didn’t force Ovechkin to chuck a controller in frustration, like a certain well-adjusted and totally mature hockey blogger.)

In case you’re wondering, Halak’s current NHL 12 rating is an 88 out of 100, ranking him high among polygonal puck-stoppers – and first place among Ovi irritants.

EA Sports’ NHL 12 simulation predicts a Penguins Stanley Cup victory in June

EA Sports NHL 12 Cup winners

There’s no such thing as an honest fortune teller. Most of the ones you’ll run into are like the one from “Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure” there to empty your wallet like Pee-Wee Herman telling you to find your missing bike in a non-existent basement in the Alamo. The NHL has something that’s actually worked out pretty well though when figuring who just might skate away with the Stanley Cup at the end of the season.

EA Sports’ NHL series of video games have done a remarkably accurate job of picking the winners and finalists over the last few years and they’re at it again with their NHL 12 series this year. This time around, EA Sports’ simulation has the Pittsburgh Penguins beating the Chicago Blackhawks in the Stanley Cup finals and captain Sidney Crosby skating with the Cup for the second time in his career.

In the previous two seasons, EA’s simulation correctly predicted the Blackhawks would win the Cup in 2010 and correctly picked out that the Canucks and Bruins would face off in the finals last year. Never mind that they had the Canucks winning in seven games, picking out the finalists is pretty good on its own. As for their other projections via video game, EA has some other fun to compare to at the end of the season.

The highlights include:

  • Toronto and Minnesota making the playoffs as the eighth seeds.
  • Sidney Crosby missing 17 regular season games and still finishing 7th in scoring in the league.
  • Alex Ovechkin scores 51 goals and wins the Hart Trophy
  • Steve Stamkos scores 53 and wins the Rocket Richard Trophy
  • Buffalo edges out Boston for the Northeast Division title
  • Florida finishes as the worst team in the league

While those projections might be a bit more far-fetched, their finals predictions have been some degree of money the last two years. We won’t lie, it’d make for a hell of a story to see Crosby bounce back after what he’s dealt with to win the Cup this year. Doing it in Chicago with all the moves they’ve made would only amp up the drama scale to about “eleventy billion” on a scale of 1-10.

What do you think though? Can we trust SkyNet a video game to give us what we’ll see at the end of the year?

(Photo: EA Sports)

NHL 12 produces biggest launch week in series’ history

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For the most part, critics raved about NHL 12, the latest installment in EA Sports’ popular hockey video game series. That’s great and all, but critical success doesn’t always allow companies to reap huge profits; simply look at the ratings for the defunct but beloved sitcom “Arrested Development” if you need to drive the point home.

Whether you pinpoint the reasoning based on strong word of mouth, a creative wave of marketing (including installments regarding the title’s nine legends) or the recent gains made by the sport itself, NHL 12 came charging out of the gate as far as sales are concerned. EA announced that the game broke first week records for the series, with the European version receiving a Sept. 9 release while the North American copy came out on Sept. 12.

Estimates indicate that more than 451,000 copies were sold, bringing in more than $27 million in retail. Chris Pereira of 1up.com reports that EA hopes to capitalize on this success by releasing a “free-to-play” Facebook game called NHL Superstars in October. (I have to admit I cringe a bit at the idea without knowing the details, as it makes me picture a hockey version of incessant “Farmville” updates. Hopefully it will be more promising than that, though.)

Here are more details about the strong first week for the game.

Electronic Arts has announced that NHL 12 enjoyed a “record-breaking launch.” After its release on September 13 in North America, EA’s internal figures peg it as having the biggest launch week in the franchise’s history. Sales were up 19 percent in North America and Europe (where it launched on September 9) as compared with last year, resulting in it bringing in more than $27 million at retail worldwide.

Record amounts of time was spent playing online, too; over 6.9 million online matches took place between September 13 and September 19. That’s the most during one week in the franchise’s history and 17 percent more than last year.

Hopefully those impressive figures will encourage EA Sports to maintain their aggressive (if subtle) approach to improving the NHL titles from NHL 12 to NHL 13 … although some might believe it’s hard to say what, exactly, they need to improve.

NHL 12 review roundup: Is it the best game yet or has the series reached a plateau?


With training camps starting up around the NHL, the hockey-starved masses are already being thrown some meat to chew on. For those who might not be satiated by rookies trying to nail down roster spots and new players/coaches getting acquainted with teams, there’s another option to try to satisfy that hunger: video games. This time around, there’s only one major title to choose from: EA Sports’ NHL 12, which released on September 13.

While there are other reviews that haven’t poured in yet, a good chunk of reactions filtered through blogs, gaming Web sites and various other outlets already. For the most part, the reviews have been very positive, but there also are some naysayers – including one whose negativity might qualify as extreme. With a few days for experts to digest the game out of the way, let’s take a look at how critics reacted to the new game.

A sampling of emphatic praise

1UP.com called it “the series’ greatest achievement” in their A- review:

This is the best version of NHL in the past three years — it’s like the previous versions were simply leading up to this release. Everything looks and feels and plays as it should; a fine balance of entertainment and realism.

Gaming Excellence gave it a 9.2 (“Excellent”) rating:

To be honest, I’m usually in the camp that skips every second NHL title because it’s hard to justify what seems like a few enhancements and a roster update for the price of a AAA game, but this time they’ve done a fantastic job with improvements that are very hard to resist.

Gaming Age gave it a 95 percent (“Superlative”) score:

What more can be said other than, NHL fans need to buy NHL 12 if only to play the best representation of the sport ever created. I don’t think I can praise it any more than that.

Are the improvements too subtle?

There aren’t many major criticisms of the game (at least as far as giving it a bad “score”), but the most consistent line of complaints indicate that the tweaks, new features and improvements aren’t enough to justify a purchase if gamers already own NHL 11. Metacritic captures many of those “it’s a great game and all, but … ” reviews, including this one from GameShark.com.

To be fair there are a lot of changes and tweaks made to the NHL 11 design, but many of them are so small to be nearly unnoticeable. As great as NHL 12 is, and it is a great game, it’s not a giant leap from NHL 11. Is that enough to warrant another $60? Only you can answer that one.

Adam Najberg of the Wall Street Journal blog Speak Easy goes as far as to wonder if EA should put the series on the shelf altogether in what must be the harshest major review for the series in a long time.

Maybe a deep cleansing breath or a hiatus would help. It certainly has for other EA Sports game franchises. On the basketball side, EA has taken a breather for a couple of years, trying to retool and reinvigorate a tired NBA game franchise that wasn’t up to snuff.


It’s not really for me to say, but until EA Sports can really come up with something new and refreshing, maybe it should consider putting its NHL game series on ice.

(Quick aside: however you might feel about the direction of the NHL series, bringing up the NBA Live/Elite hiatus won’t improve the odds for a hockey break.)

NHL 12 producer Sean Ramjasingh addressed the question of NHL 12 being a big enough improvement over NHL 11 in an interview earlier last week.

“I think this year is probably the most authentic game we’ve made; it’s leaps and bounds over NHL 11,” Ramjasingh said. “The incredible team we have here busts their butts all year to put over 300 gameplay refinements in, so as you play the game, all that depth is going to start to come through. The real game-changer for me is the hat trick of game innovations.”


This post provides a solid rundown of that “hat trick” of alterations, which seemingly impressed most critics. The ultimate criticisms come from peoples’ wallets, though, so tell us how you feel. Does the game seem worth your money, whether you already paid for it or are primed to buy it in the future? Let us know in the comments (and expect PHT’s take soon).

Teenage girl finds herself in NHL 12 after asking EA Sports why its games lacked female players


While manners-obsessed people might lean toward “Please,” the most important word in a young person’s vocabulary might just be “Why?” As an individual goes from simply absorbing the ideas of friends and family to developing a world view of their own, asking that simple question can often unravel something that once seemed like a great mystery. In one instance, asking why eventually allowed a teenage girl to appear in the most popular hockey video game on the market.

Fourteen-year-old Lexi Peters spent hours playing around with the custom team features in one of EA Sports’ NHL titles, as she hoped to recreate the Purple Eagles (an all-girls team Peters plays for). Unfortunately, the budding hockey fan ran into a significant issue: the games’ player creation options did not include a female character build.

The Buffalo native asked her father why there aren’t any women in the game, which prompted some great advice: why not send EA Sports a letter to find out? Peters did just that.

She sent a typewritten letter to the executives of one the largest video game makers in the world, asking them to add women players.

She wrote: “It is unfair to women and girl hockey players around the world, many of them who play and enjoy your game. I have created a character of myself, except I have to be represented by a male and that’s not fun.”

At first, it seemed like a lost cause, as Peters received a letter from EA saying that it couldn’t happen because such a decision would have to go through the NHL. The buck didn’t stop there, however, as NHL 12’s lead producer David Littman viewed the letter as a “wake-up call” about the game’s growing female audience.

“Lexi’s letter was a wake-up call,” Mr. Littman told the Globe and Mail. “Here’s a growing audience playing our NHL game and we hadn’t done anything to capture them.”

Mr. Littman then did some stick handling of his own: finding the budget to build her into the game, as well as getting permission from the NHL and EA’s legal department.

Then EA Sports gave Lexi the news. Not only were they adding a female character option, but they wanted Lexi to play the part of the “default” female player that gamers would then be able to customize.

“I was so excited,” says Lexi. “My dad called my grandpa immediately, who called my Uncle Chris, like a chain reaction.”

Bravo to EA Sports for listening to their customers, taking the steps to make that change and then giving Peters credit for the idea in a very clever and charming way. (This post’s main image features a screenshot of Lexi’s appearance in the game.)

The Globe & Mail article elaborates on that interesting story, as they discussed the notion that this is another sign of hockey’s growing popularity with women. The story caught up with Manon Rhéaume , a female goaltender who famously played two exhibition games for the Tampa Bay Lightning in 1992.

“It’s a big change and it’s exciting to see, because so many girls pay hockey now,” said Manon Rhéaume, the only woman to ever play in the real-world NHL.

With all of this in mind, I cannot help but wonder if female Hockey Hall of Famers Cammi Granato and Angela James might appear as legends in an NHL title in the future. Either way, this is a really cool move by EA and an example of the power of a little bit of inquisitiveness.

(That being said, I’m still holding a grudge on the Mars candy company for ignoring my 15-year-old idea to release more holiday-themed M & Ms. Maybe that cold war will melt away like those thick candy shells one of these days, though.)

[Image via The Globe & Mail.]