Tag: New York Rangers

Connor McDavid

Oilers sign McDavid to entry-level contract


Not that anyone was worried it wouldn’t happen, but the Edmonton Oilers have signed Connor McDavid to a three-year entry-level contract.

McDavid, the first overall pick in the 2015 draft, skated yesterday at Rexall Place in the Oilers’ orientation camp.

“It’s very cool,” he said, per Sportsnet. “The history that comes with this organization, the great games that have been played here… It’s such a storied franchise, to walk into the locker room and see all that stuff. It’s very special.”

McDavid’s arrival has Edmonton hockey fans optimistic that the Oilers will soon return to the playoffs for the first time since 2006.

Not that he alone makes them a Stanley Cup contender. The defense, even after the signing of Andrej Sekera, remains a question mark. Ditto for the goaltending, even after the acquisition of Cam Talbot.

But the 18-year-old phenom summed it up nicely.

“It’s an exciting time,” he said. “The last couple of years have not gone the way they wanted them to, they’ve brought in some great hockey minds, and they still have such a great young core. I’m just trying to do everything I can to make the team and be a part of that. It’s an exciting time to be a part of this organization.”

PHT Morning Skate: Columnist says Kings should part with Voynov

Slava Voynov

PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

Helene Elliott of the Los Angeles Times believes that the Kings should either trade Slava Voynov or terminate his contract, regardless of how everything ultimately shakes out with the league and law enforcement. (Los Angeles Times)

Speaking of departing Kings, The Royal Half bids Justin Williams a fond farewell. (The Royal Half)

Paul Martin’s heartfelt goodbye letter to the Pittsburgh Penguins (and fans) is a great read. It also might leave you yelling “Spumoni!” the next time you see Martin hemmed in his own zone. (Players’ Tribune)

How much better is Edmonton’s defense, really? (Oilers Nation)

Looking back at Martin St. Louis’ career. (Greatest Hockey Legends)

Steve Dangle views Phil Kessel’s time in Toronto as “an era wasted.” (Warning: you might want to turn your volume down before watching this.)

Speaking of Kessel, ouch:

Curtains on Broadway: Martin St. Louis calls it a career

New York Rangers v Tampa Bay Lightning - Game Four

One of the greatest diminutive players in NHL history is walking away.

Martin St. Louis, the 2004 Hart Trophy winner as league MVP, announced his retirement on Thursday after 16 seasons.

“I have been blessed to play for 16 years in the NHL; it has been an amazing ride,” St. Louis, 40, said in a statement.  “I would like to thank the Tampa Bay Lightning and New York Rangers organizations and owners for providing me the opportunity to play the sport I love for so many years.

“I could have never played for so long or accomplished all that I have without the unwavering love and support from my wife, Heather, our three sons, Ryan, Lucas, and Mason, and my parents.”

Undrafted out of the University of Vermont, St. Louis bounced around the IHL and AHL before making his NHL debut with Calgary during the ’98-99 campaign. He wouldn’t become a star, though, until the Flames cut him loose and he signed on in Tampa Bay.

During his 13 years with the Lightning, St. Louis emerged as one of the best and most iconic players in franchise history, cementing himself in Bolts lore during the 2003-04 campaign. That year, he led the team to its first and only Stanley Cup, topped the NHL in points (94) and took home a bounty of hardware by winning the Hart, Art Ross and Lester B. Pearson trophies.

Though his divorce from Tampa Bay was messy — he demanded a trade at the ’14 deadline, and was acrimoniously shipped off to the Rangers — St. Louis carved himself a new chapter in New York, helping the Blueshirts advance to the Stanley Cup Final in his first season with the team.

This year, he and the Rangers made it to Game 7 of the Eastern Conference Final before losing to his old Lightning mates.

All told, St. Louis was named to seven All-Star Games, earning All-NHL Second Team honors four times and All-NHL First Team honors once. His 1,033 career points are 70th all-time in league history.

“I have had the good fortune of working with some incredible players and trainers throughout my career who I am grateful to also call good friends,” St. Louis said. “I am also thankful to all of the fans who have supported me through the years; it has meant so much to me. I have dedicated my life to being the best player I could be and now want to turn more of my focus to my three boys.

“I look forward to this next chapter of my life and the time I will have with my family.”