Tag: Nashville Predators

Taylor Beck

Toronto acquires Taylor Beck from Nashville


The Predators have one less potential arbitration hearing hanging over their heads.

Nashville announced that it has sent Taylor Beck to the Toronto Maple Leafs in exchange for Jamie Devane.

Beck, 24, was taken with the 70th overall pick in the 2009 NHL Entry Draft, but he stepped up after that with back-to-back 90-plus point seasons for the WHL Guelph Storm. From there he honed his game in the minors, scoring 17 goals and 49 points in 65 contests in 2013-14.

Although he enjoyed stints with Nashville prior last season, 2014-15 was his first full campaign at the top level. He was limited to an average of 11:55 minutes per contest though and finished with eight goals and 16 points in 62 games.

He was one of three Nashville restricted free agents that had filed for arbitration, along with Craig Smith and Colin Wilson.

Devane, 24, was selected two picks ahead of Beck back in 2009. Devane had 10 points and 208 penalty minutes in 94 AHL games over the last two seasons. Unlike Beck, Devane is still under contract for one more season on a two-way deal that comes with a $575K cap hit at the NHL level.

Preds sign forwards Kamenev, Trenin to entry-level contracts

2015 NHL Draft - Portraits

A couple of Russian forwards have impressed the Preds’ brass at Nashville’s development camp.

The club announced the signing of Vladislav Kamenev and Yakov Trenin to three-year, entry-level contracts on Friday.

Kamenev spent the 2014-15 season with Magnitogorsk in the KHL scoring six goals and nine points in 41 games. The 6-foot-3, 182-pound native of Orsk, Russia added three assists at the 2015 world juniors helping the Russians win a silver medal.

Originally Nashville’s second-round pick (42nd overall) at the 2014 NHL Draft, Kamenev is expected to spend the 2015-16 season playing in North America. The Quebec Remparts own the 18-year-old’s CHL rights.

Trenin (pictured) was the Preds’ second-round pick (55th overall) at last month’s draft. The 18-year-old appeared in 58 games with the Gatineau Olympiques of the QMJHL last season scoring 18 goals and 67 points.

“He’s a big center, who plays a solid two-way game,” Preds’ North American amateur scout J-P Glaude said in a statement. “Despite coming from Russia as a 17-year-old who didn’t speak a word of English, he averaged more than a point per game and was fantastic defensively, especially in the playoffs when he was used on the power play, killing penalties, five-on-three and three-on-five.

“I see him as a complete, top-two center that can put points on the board and the coaches will love to have because he can play in any situation.”

The 6-1, 194-pound native of Chelyabinsk, Russia will likely head back to Gatineau for the 2015-16 season.

Sabres hire Allen to replace Irbe as goalie coach

Tim Murray, Dan Bylsma

The Buffalo Sabres rounded out Dan Bylsma’s coaching staff on Friday, hiring former Chicago Blackhawks goalie development boss Andrew Allen as their new goalie coach.

Allen, 38, replaces the outgoing Arturs Irbe.

A former AHL and ECHL netminder, Allen was with Chicago for the last four seasons, spending the majority of his time tutoring netminders with the club’s AHL affiliate in Rockford. During Allen’s tenure, a number of solid backups rose through the ranks: Carter Hutton (now Pekka Rinne’s No. 2 in Nashville), Antti Raanta (now Henrik Lundqvist’s backup in New York) and Scott Darling (now Corey Crawford’s backup in Chicago).

In Buffalo, Allen will work with newly-acquired starter Robin Lenher and No. 2 Chad Johnson, acquired at last season’s trade deadline.

With this hire, Bylsma’s staff is now complete — Allen will join assistant coaches Terry Murray, Dave Barr and Dan Lambert on the Sabres’ bench.

Hodgson on 14-15: ‘It was a disaster of a season by all accounts’

Nashville Predators v Buffalo Sabres

Cody Hodgson is hoping to have the kind of bounce back season Mike Ribeiro enjoyed in 2014-15.

The 25-year-old is on a similar path that Ribeiro followed last summer.

Ribeiro was bought out by the Arizona Coyotes and given a second opportunity by Preds’ GM David Poile.

Hodgson, who was bought out by the Buffalo Sabres last week, signed a similar one-year, $1.05 million deal with Nashville on July 1.

“Hopefully, I can do what he did. It’s a new opportunity for me like it was for him,” Hodgson told The Tennessean. “Hopefully, I can make the most of it like (Ribeiro) did.”

Hodgson scored a career-low six goals and 13 points in 78 games with the Sabres last season. It was just the second year of his six-year, $25.5 million deal.

“It was a rough year all the way around, on the ice, off the ice, everything could go wrong went wrong,” Hodgson said. “It was a disaster of a season by all accounts.”

In 218 games with the Sabres, over parts of four seasons, Hodgson registered 44 goals, 99 points and a minus-65 rating while averaging 16:13 in ice time.

Bishop Effect: 6-foot-9 goalie ‘trying to make a name for myself’ at Vancouver’s prospect camp


John McLean, the towering NCAA Division III goalie currently participating at Canucks prospect camp, is trending.

For starters, he’s trending on social media. After this picture surfaced on Twitter last week, websites like TSN’s Bar Down and Yahoo’s Puck Daddy took notice of what could be the tallest individual to ever tend goal professionally — after wrapping a four-year collegiate career at tiny Gustavus Adolphus College in Minnesota, the 6-foot-9 McLean played a few games for Pensacola of the Southern Professional Hockey League this spring, which paved the way for his Canucks camp invite.

And with that invite, McLean became part of another trend.

The Canucks are no doubt intrigued by McLean’s size, especially given the recent movement towards bigger goalies in the NHL — like 6-foot-7 Lightning netminder Ben Bishop, who McLean sees as something of a role model.

“I’ve never really been able to play like an NHL goalie until Ben Bishop came along,” he explained, per TSN 1040. “I’ve just kinda played my own way and used my body to my advantage.

“Just in the last couple of years with Ben Bishop and Scott Darling coming into the picture, I was able to relate to some of the goalies.”

According to the NHL.com database, four current goalies stand 6-foot-6 or taller: Bishop, Darling, Anders Lindback and Devan Dubnyk, the latter being one of three finalists for this year’s Vezina trophy.

A handful of others, like Pekka Rinne and Darcy Kuemper, are listed at 6-foot-5 — and there could be plenty more skyscrapers on the horizon, according to Bishop, the tallest goalie in NHL history.

“I don’t know if it’ll be the end of the era [of small goalies], but I think you see taller guys that can be just as athletic as the smaller guys,” Bishop said during the Stanley Cup Final. “It seems to be the way it’s trending here.

“You look at Darling, he’s 6-6, and that guy can move pretty well. You see bigger guys that can move just as well as the smaller guys, and that’s probably why teams have started going in that direction.”

McLean has a long way to go to match the likes of Bishop and Darling, but the fact he’s at an NHL prospects camp at all is telling. Most goalies with resumes boasting Div. 3 hockey and low-tier professional experience aren’t going to get this kind of chance — but then again, most goalies’ waists aren’t at the crossbar while standing, like McLean’s is.

The 25-year-old knows his time in Vancouver is a huge break for his career, and wants to make the most of it.

“I just use my size to my advantage, and try to play big,” he explained. “I’m just trying to make a name for myself right now, and play where someone wants me.”

Related: Does Bishop, the tallest goalie in NHL history, mark ‘wave of the future’ in net?