Tag: Minnesota North Stars

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Video: Wild honor J.P. Parise with a video tribute


The Minnesota Wild honored the late J.P. Parise with a video tribute prior to puck drop against the Chicago Blackhawks tonight.

Parise, the father of Wild forward Zach, passed away on Thursday after a lengthy battle with lung cancer.

The Wild are also wearing a No. 11 decal on their helmets.

Parise spent parts of nine seasons with the Minnesota North Stars scoring 154 goals and 396 points in 588 games.

Hall Call: Hasek, Blake, Forsberg, and Modano make up 2014 Hall of Fame class

Dominik Hasek

The 2014 Hockey Hall of Fame induction class is one for the ages.

Dominik Hasek, Rob Blake, Peter Forsberg, and Mike Modano have been elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame for their storied careers as players.

Hasek was a six-time Vezina Trophy winner and a two-time winner of the Hart Trophy as league MVP while with the Buffalo Sabres. He’s also been a member of two Stanley Cup winning teams in Detroit with the Red Wings in 2002 and 2008.

Blake played for 20 years with the Los Angeles Kings, Colorado Avalanche, and San Jose Sharks and won a Stanley Cup patrolling the blue line with the Avs in 2001. He scored 40 or more points in 12 seasons in the NHL and was a Hobey Baker Award finalist at Bowling Green.

Forsberg was as dominating a force as could be found in the NHL during his 14 seasons in the NHL. He was the Calder Trophy winner in 1995 and won two Stanley Cups with the Avalanche in 1996 and 2001. Originally a first-round pick of the Philadelphia Flyers, he’ll forever be linked with Eric Lindros as part of the monster trade that sent Lindros to Philly and the building blocks to Cup winners to the Quebec Nordiques. He won the Hart Trophy in 2003 and won two Olympic gold medals with Sweden in 1994 and 2006.

source: APModano was the face of the Minnesota North Stars/Dallas Stars franchise over 21 out of his 22 seasons in the NHL before finishing his career at home in Michigan with the Red Wings. In his career he piled up 561 goals and 1,374 points, the most ever by an American-born player. His crowning achievement came in 1999 winning the Stanley Cup with Dallas beating Hasek’s Sabres.

Also joining those four are longtime coach Pat Burns who was elected as a builder and referee Bill McCreary who was selected for his work as an official.

Burns was a three-time Jack Adams Award winner as coach of the year and won his lone Stanley Cup with the New Jersey Devils in 2003. He’s forever known as being the face of the Montreal Canadiens and Toronto Maple Leafs during the 1980s and ’90s.  He also led the Boston Bruins for four seasons in the late ’90s. Burns finished his career in 2004 with a career winning percentage of .574 but passed away in 2010 from cancer.

McCreary spent 27 years as a referee in the league working 1,700 regular season games and 282 playoff games. Known for his mustache and no-nonsense style, he earned the respect of everyone throughout the league and was often the man called on to officiate the biggest games. He also worked the 1998 and 2002 Olympics and earned the call to work the gold medal game in both tournaments.

USA Today’s Kevin Allen and CSNChicago’s Pat Foley are the 2014 Media Honorees. That group will be inducted on Monday, November 17 in Toronto.

Best and worst sweaters of all-time: Dallas Stars

Brenden Morrow

All right, listen… Not all sweaters can be big winners and remembered forever. The Stars have a nice look to what they’ve got and throughout their history in Dallas they’ve done well embracing the black and green. Unfortunately, they’ve got a much better looking past to contend with among NHL fans outside of Dallas.

Instead of picking one side or the other here to suck up to, I’ll make sure to tick everyone off in some way. Here’s to hoping that Brenden Morrow, Steve Ott, or Neal Broten don’t show up at my door and punch me in the gut.

Best: I’m going to do my best to not pick a Minnesota North Stars sweater here because those days are over. With that stipulation in the way, I’m going to side with their current road sweaters that have “DALLAS” emblazoned across the front with the number on the front of the sweater with it. This sweater in particular started as their alternate sweater, but the look was so good already on their home blacksweater, they had to double their pleasure by putting it on the white as well.

It’s a look that goes against the grain for most NHL sweaters and it often reminds fans a bit too much of the NFL. The crazy part here, it’s a good look. It’s clean, has the Stars logo on the shoulders, and looks seamless. Black, green, and gold are the main colors for the team, but the white sweaters pop with ferocity.

Worst: When you create an alternate sweater that instead of making fans and curious on-lookers think of constellations and the heavens the way it was supposed to, makes them think of cows and female reproductive organs, you’ve failed. The “mooterus” sweater is one that rather than being a hockey sweater is an awkward test of human psychology; like an ink blot test that everyone calls out for being “fallopian tubes” instead of “cattle constellation.” It’s awkward, it’s ugly, it makes everyone squirm in their seats because they’re thinking of seventh grade health class.

Old-timey favorite: All right, now it’s time to talk North Stars. Perhaps the saddest part about Norm Green screwing over the fans in Minnesota when he moved the team to Dallas is that we were forced to lose the Minnesota North Stars sweater. With the perfect logo, the fun color scheme, and a look that lives on to this day as a popular one for NHL fans, it’s one I’m still sad isn’t around on the ice night in and night out. It’s one of those perfect sweaters from the 70s and 80s that everyone can say that they love. Much like the Whalers and Nordiques, when the North Stars moved away part of hockey’s heart went with it.

Assessment: The Stars’ current sweaters are great. They’re boring, but they’re great. The home black sweater is just as good as the road white and while the logo isn’t the biggest part of either. While the logo lives on in their white alternate sweater (one that features their great secondary logo on the shoulders as well) the Stars just don’t have that sort of iconic look to them even in spite of winning the Stanley Cup in 1999. I’m sure fans in Dallas will disagree with me on this and hate that the North Stars are even mentioned here, but you’re going to have to deal with it.