Tag: Mike Richards

Dean Lombardi

Kopitar out, Lombardi irate as Kings will play shorthanded vs. Flyers


The first ramification of Slava Voynov’s suspended-indefinitely-but-still-on-the-books situation has come about, as the Kings will play with less than a full compliment of players tonight in Philadelphia.

Anze Kopitar is out with an upper-body injury and because the club is operating so close to the salary cap ceiling, it is unable to get a replacement forward in the lineup.

More, from the L.A. Times:

Per LA Kings Insider, the Kings have been in “ongoing conversations” with both the NHL and PA regarding potential cap relief for Voynov, who is still on the books at $4.16M — despite the fact he’s not available to play while under investigation for allegations of domestic assault.

As a result, the Kings will have 11 forwards tonight: Tanner Pearson, Jeff Carter, Tyler Toffoli, Dwight King, Mike Richards, Dustin Brown, Kyle Clifford, Jarret Stoll, Justin Williams, Andrey Andreoff and Jordan Nolan.

Kopitar, Marian Gaborik and Trevor Lewis (both of whom are on IR) are out.

Video: Quick robs Parise as part of 40-save performance

Jonathan Quick

Jonathan Quick highlighted his 40 save performance with a huge save off the Wild’s Zach Parise with just over 30 seconds remaining as Kings held on for a 2-1 win Sunday.


Tyler Toffoli opened the scoring late in the first period with his third of the season and setup Tanner Pearson in the third for the game winner.

Matt Cooke had the lone Wild goal.

Niklas Backstrom, who was making his regular season debut, made 14 saves in the loss.

The game had a bit of everything.

Midway through the second period, Wild defenseman Christian Folin hammered Anze Kopitar in the neutral zone. Mike Richards took exception and jumped in to fight the Wild rookie.

For his efforts, Richards got five for fighting, two minutes for instigating and a 10 minute misconduct.

Then late in the period, Wild forward Jason Zucker had a close call as a skate came up and nearly cut him in the face.

The Wild have won just one of their last three while the Kings have now won four straight.

Kings re-sign Muzzin: five years, $20 million

Jake Muzzin #6 of the Los Angeles Kings skates against the Anaheim Ducks at Honda Center on September 17, 2013 in Anaheim, California.
(September 16, 2013 - Source: Jeff Gross/Getty Images North America)

The Los Angeles Kings are doing all they can to keep those dynasty talks alive.

On Wednesday, defenseman Jake Muzzin — a key contributor in each of L.A.’s last two playoff runs — was signed to a five-year contract extension, keeping him in L.A. through 2019-20 campaign.

Per TSN’s Darren Dreger, the deal is $20 million over five years, good for a $4 million average annual cap hit and a nice raise for Muzzin, who’s in the last of a two-year deal that pays $1M annually. When the extension kicks in, Muzzin — who was a pending RFA — will become the Kings’ third highest-paid defenseman, trailing only Drew Doughty and Slava Voynov.

The 25-year-old has emerged as a quality producer for the Kings since making his NHL debut four season ago. Muzzin recorded a career-high 24 points last year and was fantastic in the playoffs, scoring six goals and 12 points (leading all L.A. defensemen in tallies). The former OHL Sault Ste. Marie product also averaged 23:24 TOI per game in the postseason, second-most on the team.

With Muzzin locked up, the Kings now have the following players under contract through 2019: Muzzin, Doughty, Voynov, Jonathan Quick, Marian Gaborik, Dustin Brown, Mike Richards and Jeff Carter.

PHT’s Season Preview: 30 questions, 180 answers

Alex Ovechkin, John Tavares

We made a list of 30 questions ahead of the 2014-15 NHL season, then we tried to answer those questions. Enjoy:

1. Of all the teams that missed the playoffs last season, the most likely to make the playoffs this season is…

Jason Brough: Washington. I considered a few teams here, but I think Barry Trotz will be good for the Caps, and I liked the Matt Niskanen signing.

James O’Brien: The Isles. The Capitals and Devils are awfully tempting choices, but I love what Garth Snow did this offseason.

Ryan Dadoun: The New York Islanders. I think their top two forward lines look pretty good and Jaroslav Halak should be solid between the pipes.

Cam Tucker:  Vancouver. Outside of trading Ryan Kesler, the core didn’t change, but they’ve added younger players and a new coach known for getting the most out of his players.

Dhiren Mahiban: Can’t argue with the Islanders choice. The additions of Johnny Boychuk, Nick Leddy and Halak certainly make them better on the back end. Throw in a healthy John Tavares and this is a playoff team.

Mike Halford: Isles. Three of the Metro’s playoff teams from last year — Rangers, Flyers and Blue Jackets — have their issues and could take a step back.

2.Of all the teams that made the playoffs last season, the most likely to miss the playoffs is…

JB: Philadelphia. The blue line was already a concern before Kimmo Timonen was diagnosed with blood clots. Can’t say I’m the biggest believer in Steve Mason either.

JO: Philadelphia. Even if that offensive attack is so potent that it’s very scary to pick against them.

RD: Columbus. I really want to believe in the Blue Jackets, but with Nathan Horton out and Ryan Johansen missing training camp, I’m really wondering about the offense.

CT: Detroit. Aging core group of forwards that’s struggled to stay healthy. And that playoff streak, at 23 years now, has to end eventually, right?

DM: Detroit. Pavel Datsyuk and Henrik Zetterberg are coming off injuries and are a year older. Youngsters Gustav Nyquist, Tomas Tatar and Tomas Jurco won’t be catching anyone by surprise this season.

MH: Columbus. Will get off to a slow start (Horton/Jenner/Murray out, Johansen trying to get up to speed) and never recover.

3. The Red Wings have made the playoffs 23 straight seasons. Will they make it 24?

JB: No. I absolutely hate betting against a Mike Babcock-coached team, but it feels like the end of an era in Detroit.

JO: Yes. It won’t be pretty, but Babcock will scowl his way into another postseason and then gain the Bill Belichick-like power he craves … just maybe not in Detroit.

RD: Yes. They’re lucky they moved from the Western Conference to the East when they did.

CT: No. Again, health a big concern. Not entirely sold on their goaltending, either.

DM: No. Health and young players providing a repeat performance are big concerns.

MH: Yes. I don’t get why everybody’s so down on the Wings. They had 93 points last year with basically half their roster. Zetterberg’s healthy, Howard’s healthy and Nyquist is primed for his first full NHL season.

4. The Edmonton Oilers have missed the playoffs eight straight seasons. Will they make it nine?

JB: Yes. Too many good teams in the West, combined with too little experience down the middle. I think they’ll be harder to play against though.

JO: Yes. This is the first time I’ve nearly been lured in by the siren call of their potential, but a stacked West provides the beeswax to resist for one more year.

RD: Yes. I think the Oilers are moving in the right direction, but I look at their competition and I just don’t see how Edmonton can squeeze into the playoffs.

CT: Yes. They play in the Pacific Division.

DM: Yes. The Pacific Division is just too strong and the Oilers are predominantly young and inexperienced.

MH: I want to say no just to be different, but yes.

5. The worst team in the NHL will be…

JB: Calgary. But holy heck could the Flames be dangerous in a few years if they get Connor McDavid or Jack Eichel.

JO: Buffalo. The Sabres’ third jersey should be a tank … with swords.

RD: Buffalo. The Sabres were remarkably bad last season and I don’t think they’ve closed the gap between them and the rest of the league.

CT: Florida. Even with Roberto Luongo and Shawn Thornton.

DM: Carolina. Jordan Staal is out 3-4 months. Now Jeff Skinner’s health is in question.

MH: Carolina. Even the owner wants out of this mess.

6. The biggest wildcard team (i.e. could be good, could be awful) is…

JB: Islanders. On paper, they’re a lot better than last season. That said, I always get nervous about “good on paper” teams, and I have trouble putting 100 percent faith in an organization that hasn’t won a playoff series since 1993.

JO: Edmonton. They actually employ two goalies who could conceivably be above average. But…Oilers.

RD: Washington. If Braden Holtby plays well, if Barry Trotz can get the most out of the players, then they could be something special. This team has plenty of risks though.

CT: Toronto. The Leafs give up a lot of shots, and it caught up with them last season. But this team has good players. They just need to be used the right way.

DM: Toronto. So many “ifs” on this team. The roster has potential though.

MH: San Jose. I literally have no idea what to expect from a team that may have had a nervous breakdown this summer. The Sharks could win the division. They could also be a steaming pile of diapers. Neither would surprise me.

source: Getty Images7. Are the San Jose Sharks more likely to be a complete disaster or Stanley Cup champs?

JB: Stanley Cup champs. I just remember what people were saying about the Bruins after they blew that 3-0 lead to the Flyers in 2010. We all know what they did the next year. (That being said, I’m not ruling out complete disaster.)

JO: Stanley Cup champs. Even after a dopey offseason, the Sharks didn’t blow everything up. I will change my tune if they foolishly trade Joe Thornton and/or Patrick Marleau, however.

RD: Stanley Cup champs. It’s hard to look at their roster and see them as anything other than a playoff team.

CT: Stanley Cup champs. I would define complete disaster as missing the playoffs. Don’t see that happening.

DM: Stanley Cup champs?! C’mon, this team has never been past the conference final. It’ll stay that way.

MH: Complete disaster. No, wait, Stanley Cup champs. No, wait, complete disaster. No, wait…

8. True or false: the Colorado Avalanche will prove the analytics guys right and regress.

JB: True. Tough to say how far they’ll regress, but I sure don’t see them winning the Central again. Wouldn’t be shocked if they missed the playoffs.

JO: True. I don’t think Semyon Varlamov can replicate that “Dominik Hasek carrying Buffalo” impression from 2013-14.

RD: True. I can’t see them matching last season’s 52-22-8 record, but they should still make the playoffs.

CT: True, but they’ll still qualify for the playoffs.

DM: True, they set the bar awfully high last season, but they’ll still make the playoffs.

MH: True. And I, for one, welcome our new fancy stats overlords and would like to remind them that as a trusted internet blogger, I can be helpful in browbeating others into their nerdy ways.

9. One team that isn’t getting enough respect is…

JB: Pittsburgh. Yes, the Pens have had some serious postseason letdowns in recent seasons, but it’s not like they’ve gone out in the first round every year. I also really liked the Christian Ehrhoff signing.

JO: Vancouver. Their core is getting a little creaky, but everyone (save the occasional Chris Higgins) looked worse in John Tortorella’s ill-fitting system.

RD: The New York Rangers. They made it to the Stanley Cup Final, but seven teams have better odds than them to be the 2015 champions.

CT: Anaheim. They play in California. They’re in the shadow of the L.A. Kings, Stanley Cup champs.

DM: Pittsburgh. Sure they cleaned out their front office and fired their head coach, but Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin give this team a chance to win every season. 

MH: Nashville. They played basically all of last year without Pekka Rinne, yet still finished with 88 points. And the Laviolette/Ribeiro/Roy additions should improve the offense.

10. One team that’s getting too much respect is…

JB: Dallas. The exciting Stars are one of my favorite teams to watch, but that blue line is nowhere near championship caliber.

JO: Dallas. Brutal conference, walking a tightrope with shaky defense and Kari Lehtonen’s fragility, yet that tantalizing array of talent makes them a fun watch.

RD: Anaheim. The Ducks have a strong offense and getting Ryan Kesler helps. However, they’re betting it all on a pair of talented, but still very inexperienced goaltenders.

CT: Colorado. Took some very good steps last year. But it was just one season. Do it again.

DM: Anaheim. Ryan Kesler was certainly a great offseason acquisition, but last time I checked, he doesn’t play goal. Two inexperienced goaltenders will hurt their chances. 

MH: Wait, when did Colorado get too much respect? And the correct answer is Dallas.

11. The number of teams with a legitimate chance of winning the Stanley Cup is…

JB: Nine. (Los Angeles, Chicago, Anaheim, St. Louis, San Jose, Boston, Pittsburgh, Tampa Bay, Montreal.)

JO: Same Nine. (Los Angeles, Chicago, Anaheim, St. Louis, San Jose, Boston, Pittsburgh, Tampa Bay, Montreal.)

RD: Ten. (Boston, Tampa Bay, Montreal, Pittsburgh, the New York Rangers, St. Louis, Chicago, San Jose, Los Angeles, Anaheim.)

CT: Seven (Boston, Pittsburgh, New York Rangers, Anaheim, San Jose, Chicago, L.A.)

DM: Six (Boston, Pittsburgh, Chicago, Anaheim, L.A., St. Louis)

MH: Six (Boston, Pittsburgh, L.A., Chicago, St. Louis, Tampa Bay)

source: Getty Images12. The last team to make your cut was…

JB: Montreal. With PK Subban, Carey Price, and the relatively easy Eastern Conference earning the Habs the nod.

JO: Anaheim. On one hand, the Ducks lack the depth and stability of the West’s best teams. On the other, they have more than $9 million in cap space if management wants to invest in some reinforcements.

RD: Anaheim, for the reasons mentioned above.

CT: Pittsburgh. Never really considered leaving them off.

DM: St. Louis. They haven’t made it past the second round since 2002, but the pieces are coming together nicely.  

MH: Tampa Bay. Love the upgrades.

13. The best team to miss your cut was…

JB: Minnesota. With the goaltending uncertainty and all the other tough Western Conference teams going against the Wild.

JO: The Rangers. Henrik Lundqvist heals many wounds, but they suffered some tough losses this offseason.

RD: Dallas. I have concerns about their blueline and that’s what kept them off my list, but they’re strong in every other respect.

CT: Montreal. They’re a final four team, but getting to the next level, I’m not sure.

DM: The Rangers. They got to the final last year, but lost some key players this summer.

MH: Anaheim. Loaded up front, not so much on defense.

14. The Canadian team with the best chance to win the country’s first Stanley Cup since 1993 is…

JB: Obvious answer is Montreal. The sad thing for Canadian hockey fans? Vancouver ranks No. 2 on my list. And while I think they’ll fight for a playoff spot, it’s hard to call the Canucks Cup contenders anymore.

JO: Montreal faces the easier path to the championship round, boasts an elite goalie (Carey Price) and an elite blueliner (P.K. Subban) plus very good prime-age players and a potential breakout candidate in Alex Galchenyuk. They’re a tempting finalist pick even beyond the Canadian confines, honestly.

RD: Montreal by default. Don’t get me wrong, I think the Canadiens are a good team, but it’s not like they have much competition among their Canadian counterparts.

CT: Montreal. Wouldn’t surprise me if the Habs are the only Canadian team to make the playoffs — again.

DM: Montreal. With Carey Price healthy last season, they could’ve been in the final last year.

MH: Montreal. There’s no other real answer here.

source: Getty Images
John Gibson

15. The goaltending storyline you’re most interested to follow is…

JB: The one in Anaheim, where the Ducks are going with “the kids,” John Gibson and Frederik Andersen.

JO: Anaheim’s my first vote, although I’m quite excited to see what happens regarding contract years for Marc-Andre Fleury and Antti Niemi, too.

RD: Anaheim’s, but for the sake of being different, I’ll say St. Louis. I’m a big fan of the Blues and part of that is because I believe Brian Elliott is capable of leading that team.

CT: Vancouver. Ryan Miller was the big free agent signing and is working with a new goalie coach in Rollie Melanson. Plus, back-up Eddie Lack has looked good in the preseason. Plus, what is Vancouver without a goaltending controversy? Come on…

DM: Toronto. The Leafs brought back James Reimer despite an obvious rift with head coach Randy Carlyle. What happens if Jonathan Bernier suffers a significant injury this season? We all remember how it went down the stretch last year.

MH: Carolina. Is Cam Ward going to be the league’s highest-paid backup? And if he is, how bad will that look on what could be the NHL’s worst team?

16. A young player you expect to burst onto the scene is…

JB: Leon Draisaitl in Edmonton. Currently pegged as the Oilers’ second-line center. A big job for an 18-year-old rookie, but a big opportunity, too.

JO: Seth Jones, unless that’s cheating because he already did burst onto the scene? Peter Laviolette’s system could be a fantastic fit for his skills.

RD: Jonathan Drouin. He might start the season on the sidelines, but he could end up leading all rookies in points if he gets a top-six role in Tampa Bay.

CT: Johnny Gaudreau. Might not be the biggest guy, but his skill is unreal.

DM: Johnny Gaudreau. From what I’ve seen in the rookie tournament and preseason action this kid has high-end skill.

MH: Curtis Lazar. Played his way onto Ottawa’s roster despite turning 19 just nine months ago. Bryan Murray loves the kid and already suggested he’ll be up for the whole year, not just a nine-game cameo.

17. One big-name player that will get traded before the deadline is…

JB: I had been all set to answer Bobby Ryan here, but now that he’s signed, I’ll have to go with…ummm…not many quality pending UFAs, are there…ummm…fine, screw it…Evander Kane.

JO: Antti Niemi strikes me as “the odd Shark out.”

RD: I think Evander Kane’s time in Winnipeg is finally drawing to a close.

CT: Evander Kane. Seriously, is he happy in Winnipeg?

DM: Boston still has defensemen Adam McQuaid and Matt Bartkowski, who become unrestricted after this season. With Dougie Hamilton and Torey Krug also restricted after 2014-15, doubt both McQuaid and Bartkowski finish the season in Boston.

MH: Assuming the trade of Matt “Big-Name” Bartkowski doesn’t knock the earth off its rotational axis, I could see Jaromir Jagr going if the Devils are out of playoff contention.

18. The player with the most to prove is…

JB: It’s a tie, between Joe Thornton and Patrick Marleau. Not only do they still have to prove it to everyone outside the Sharks organization, now they have to prove it to their coach and GM as well.

JO: P.K. Subban is already a magnet for often-absurd criticism, but slap a $9 million price tag on him and he best cure all of Montreal’s ills.

RD: Braden Holtby. The Capitals have put a lot of trust in him by signing Justin Peters rather than going with someone with a more realistic shot of competing for the starting gig.

CT: Steven Stamkos. Was on a torrid scoring pace when he suffered a devastating injury. Played in only 37 games last season. He’s the best scorer in the game and I think he wants to prove that over a full 82-game season. (And maybe win a Cup?)

DM: Ryan Johansen. After one good season he spent all summer in a bitter, well-documented contract dispute with the Jackets. I’d say he’s got something to prove.

MH: Mike Richards. The Kings showed faith by not buying him out and Richards returned the favor by actually working out this summer. Seems like both sides are expecting a bounce-back campaign.

source: Reuters19. True or false: this will be Marc-Andre Fleury’s last season in Pittsburgh.

JB: False. Mostly because, who else is going to be the starter? It’s not like the Pens have some stud youngster knocking on the door, and the options are going to be limited in free agency.

JO: True. Thomas Greiss showed some promise in backup gigs (and would probably receive a much cheaper extension), while this new front office is in no way married to “MAF.” Why pay a premium on average goaltending?

RD: False. I think if the Penguins were completely comfortable with Fleury, they would have made more of an effort to re-sign him before the start of the season, but the Penguins’ alternatives aren’t great.

CT: True. Flip of the coin, really. Pending UFA at the end of the season. Perhaps a change of scenery next summer might do him some good?

DM: True. Pending UFA and has some disastrous showings in the playoffs in years past. Not even his pal Sidney Crosby can save him now.

MH: False. Go look at the UFA goalies for 2015. Now tell me the Pens are ready to dump Fleury and test the market.

20. True or false: Barry Trotz will be good for Alex Ovechkin.

JB: True. I really don’t think Trotz wants to turn the Caps into a grinding, defensive team. I think he’s excited to coach a group with so much offensive potential, given that’s what he lacked during most of his tenure in Nashville. Washington just needs a bit more structure, and Trotz is the kind of coach who can teach them that. Which will help, not hinder, Ovechkin.

JO: True, mainly by being smart enough to move him back to LW and by merely not being Adam Oates or Dale Hunter. “Can they coexist?” is a fun story, no doubt, but the true key is getting more out of Ovechkin’s supporting cast.

RD: True. Trotz has been fighting against the idea that he’s a defensive coach and with that in mind, I think the changes he’ll seek from Ovechkin will largely be tweaks rather than part of an effort to reinvent him.

CT: True. Trotz has always been able to get more from less in Nashville. His biggest star was a defenseman in Shea Weber. Interesting to see what he can get out of with so much scoring ability.

DM: True. Trotz will get more out of Ovechkin than Adam Oates and Dale Hunter did.

MH: True. Moving Ovi back to left wing was a good start, too.

21. The most successful new head coach will be…

JB: Willie Desjardins in Vancouver. A much better fit than the last guy. 

JO: Desjardins, mainly by not being Torts.

RD: I’ll take the easy way out and say Willie Desjardins. The bar has been set very low.

CT: Mike Johnston. He has Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin. Helpful.

DM: I’ll go Johnston. Crosby and Malkin. Enough said.

MH: Gerard Gallant in Florida. Mostly because the bar was set so low. Also, he hasn’t been mentioned yet.

22. The least successful new head coach will be…

JB: Bill Peters in Carolina. Not because of him, necessarily. That’s just not a very good team.

JO: Peters. Blame the people shopping for the groceries instead of the “cook” in this case, though.

RD: Peter Laviolette. He’s expected to make the Predators a better team offensively, but has he been given the tools to do that?

CT: Bill Peters. Carolina, man.

DM: Agreed Bill Peters has almost no chance with the way the injury bug has bitten already.

MH: Rhymes will Pill Beaters.

source: AP23. The first head coach to be fired will be…

JB: Randy Carlyle in Toronto. Frankly, I was surprised he kept his job at all.

JO: Logically it would be Carlyle, but I get a weird feeling he’s going to linger around. So, instead, I think Paul MacLean will be the fall guy in Ottawa.

RD: Dave Tippett. I realize I’m going against the board and certainly the popular opinion here, but Arizona seems to be setting itself up for a disappointing campaign and I think Tippett will ultimately be the one that pays for that.

CT: Randy Carlyle. The Leafs ended last season on a disastrous note. Honestly, how long does he last with a poor start to this season?

DM: Carlyle. With the promotion of Steve Spott, it appears Brendan Shanahan may have Carlyle’s replacement already on the bench.

MH: Ken Hitchcock in St. Louis. First sign of trouble and he’s gone. Remember, Doug Armstrong fired Davis Payne just 13 games into the ’11-12 campaign.

24. The NHL general manager on the hottest seat is…

JB: Has to be Doug Wilson in San Jose. Such a bizarre offseason. Nobody’s opened himself up to more criticism. 

JO: Dave Nonis is basically Jack Lemmon in Glengarry Glen Ross at this point, watching in anger as some punk kid tries to tell him how to analyze hockey/sell real estate.

RD: David Poile. He removed Trotz. When that doesn’t get Nashville back into the playoffs, I think he’ll be next.

CT: Dave Nonis. He’s a remaining part from the Brian Burke era. Leafs might be best served to just get a fresh face in that post.

DM: Dave Nonis. Like Carlyle’s replacement, Shanahan is high on Kyle Dubas — could be Nonis’ replacement.

MH: I feel like James should go back and re-watch that movie. Anyway, my answer is Doug Wilson.

25. The best offseason addition (player joining a new team) will turn out to be…

JB: Ehrhoff. That guy’s gonna rack up some points with the Pens.

JO: Eschewing sheer value picks (like Steve Downie on the cheap) in favor of overall impact, the Islanders needed reliable goaltending badly and Jaroslav Halak fits that bill.

RD: If we were going on impact compared to his cap hit, I really like the value Chicago is getting in Brad Richards. In terms of overall impact though, I think Ryan Miller will play a big role in turning Vancouver around.

CT: Radim Vrbata. Right-handed shot that loves to shoot, could help Sedin twins get back to their old offensive ways.

DM: Scott Hartnell. Adds experience to a young team.

MH: Ryan Kesler in Anaheim. Him and Getzlaf represent the West’s best one-two punch at center.

26. True or false: This will be Mike Babcock’s final season as head coach of the Red Wings.

JB: True. I don’t think he looks at that team and sees a Stanley Cup in the near future.

JO: True, mainly because he desires (and probably deserves) the kind of sweeping authority that’s unlikely to come in Detroit.

RD: True. There will be no shortage of interested parties and I can’t help but think that if he was committed to re-signing with Detroit, it would have happened by now.

CT: True. What more is left for him to do in Detroit?

DM: True. He’s ready for his next challenge.

MH: True. I think Detroit already has its next head coach under contract — AHL Grand Rapids bench boss Jeff Blashill.

source: Getty Images27. The team that should be most worried about its goaltending is…

JB: Winnipeg. It’s such a glaring weakness, and has been for a while.

JO: Winnipeg. Ondrej Pavelec is the Tyler Myers of goalies; his struggles have been lampooned for long enough that I almost feel kinda bad kicking that dead horse.

RD: Minnesota. Josh Harding is out and they can’t rely on Niklas Backstrom to stay healthy. The Wild have to hope that Darcy Kuemper doesn’t regress, because he might end up as their starter for significant stretches of the season.

CT: Tampa Bay. The Lightning are one Ben Bishop injury away from having to rely on 39-year-old Evgeni Nabokov. He is, however, a step up from the previous back-up, Anders Lindback.

DM: Winnipeg. With just three NHL games to his name, I’m not sure how much better Michael Hutchinson is behind Pavelec.

MH: Winnipeg. Did someone really say Tampa Bay?

28. Your worst prediction from last season was…

JB: The Oilers making the playoffs. Not my finest moment. Though I did nail the Canucks being a disaster. So, you know…whatever…gimme a break, predictions are hard.

JO: Let’s just say I was a bit too eager about the rebirth of the Seattle Sonics (in the form of an NHL team).

RD: Calling Vincent Lecavalier the best offseason signing and Valtteri Filppula the worst? Yeah, that didn’t play out like I thought it would.

CT: Oilers making the playoffs. I followed that up by saying that of the teams that made the playoffs in 2013, the Habs were the most likely to miss the post-season in 2014. Brutal.

DM: I’m new here, but trust me, my predictions are never wrong.

MH: I said nobody would challenge Luongo in Vancouver and ’13-14 would be like his first season as a Canuck, “when he played a career-high 76 games and earned a Vezina nomination.” Whoops.

29. The prediction you’re least confident about this season is…

JB: Um, all of them? But if I had to pick one, my instincts are telling me not to be so bullish about the Capitals.

JO: It’s a 28-way tie! Really though, forecasting firings makes me really uncomfortable, especially since Paul MacLean is a pretty good coach with an absolutely breathtaking ‘stache.

RD: I have a feeling I’ll be proved wrong when it comes to Tippett being fired.

CT: Trotz being good for Ovechkin. Just not confident.

DM: Dubas replacing Nonis as GM. Does he even have a driver’s license yet?

MH: Hitch getting fired first. Two years ago I said Joel Quenneville would be first out the door, and Chicago won the Cup. I’ve really got my finger on the coaching pulse.

30. Finally, make a crazy prediction that probably won’t happen, but on second thought, you never know…

JB: Andrew Barroway takes control of the Coyotes, promises to keep the team in Glendale, then starts making a lot of business trips to Seattle for some reason.

JO: Antti Niemi gets traded, then leads his new team to a playoff series victory against San Jose … because that’s just the kind of thing that always seems to happen to the Sharks.

RD: Joe Thornton will win the Art Ross Trophy. After being stripped of the captaincy, listening all summer about how the Sharks need to focus on their future, and perhaps being asked to waive his no-trade clause, he’ll have his best season since Boston sent him to San Jose.

CT: The Stanley Cup finalists come from California and Florida. I can see the headlines: ‘Sun shines on Stanley Cup Final’ and ‘Stanley Cup Final heats up.’ I’m bad with headlines.

DM: The Calgary Flames end their five-year drought and qualify for the playoffs. Hey… they’re further along in the rebuild than Edmonton.

MH: The Canucks and Ducks meet in the first round of the playoffs. In overtime of Game 7, Kesler gets called for diving, the Canucks score on the power play, and Luongo tweets something funny.

Enjoy the season, everyone!

Risk Factors: Los Angeles Kings edition

2014 NHL Stanley Cup Final - Game Five

From the same bunch of pessimists who brought you “Why your team won’t win the Stanley Cup,” PHT presents a new series called “Risk Factors,” i.e. three reasons to be worried about each NHL team in 2014-15.

Los Angeles Kings

1. They’ve played a ton of hockey recently. The Kings won the Stanley Cup in 2012, went to the Western Conference Final in ’13 and won it all again last year. That made for some long springs and short summers, which didn’t leave much for the requisite rest and recuperation needed to embark on yet another 82-game regular season.

It’s fair to say all that hockey took its toll. Jonathan Quick spent the offseason and a good chunk of the preseason rehabbing his surgically-repaired wrist, which came after a ’13-14 campaign in which he missed two months with a groin injury. (Quick also underwent back surgery following L.A.’s first Cup win.)

NHL on NBC analyst Pierre McGuire referenced Quick’s health during a preseason conference call:

“I think another compounding thing is you just don’t know the health of Kings goalie Jonathan Quick (who had wrist surgery in June),” McGuire said. “I asked Jonathan if he felt a lot of young people would try and copy his goaltending style over time because he’s proven to be so successful.

“He said they may try and copy it but they’re going to end up in the emergency room.

“He plays just super aggressive and as [NBCSN executive producer] Sam Flood once said about Tim Thomas, he plays the [goalie] position like a linebacker in football. Quick does the same thing, and I worry a lot about whether he’ll have enough juice left in the tank.”

Kyle Clifford, meanwhile, was off ice this summer recovering from a broken wrist suffered during the Cup Final; Drew Doughty was absent from a large part of training camp dealing with an upper-body injury; Marian Gaborik missed four exhibition games with a groin ailment.

Part of this stems from playing so many games — lest we forget that six Kings (Quick, Doughty, Dustin Brown, Jeff Carter, Anze Kopitar, Slava Voynov) also played in Sochi — but part of this stems from the way L.A. plays. Darryl Sutter’s offense is predicated on getting pucks in deep, grinding to retrieve them, then grinding some more while keeping possession. The Kings are a big, heavy team that doesn’t shy away from taking the body, but even the strongest wear down after time.

2. They’re thinner than before. Los Angeles returns most of the team that hoisted Lord Stanley’s Mug in June, but a few key contributors are gone. Once GM Dean Lombardi made re-signing Gaborik a top priority, the resulting cap crunch meant there was no room for Willie Mitchell, a vital cog in both of Los Angeles’ championships.

Not to overstate Mitchell’s importance, but do consider this: the season he missed (2013) was the one in which L.A. failed to advance to the Final; last year, the 37-year-old blueliner averaged over 20 minutes during the regular season then expanded that role in the playoffs, bumping his TOI to 22:20 while scoring four points in 18 games.

“I miss Mitchie here on this team,” Doughty said recently, per LA Kings Insider.

The Kings’ cap crunch also cost them promising youngster Linden Vey, who was flipped to Vancouver at the draft. Though Vey only appeared in 18 games last year, he was one of three youngsters who starred in AHL Manchester and seemed destined to do good things with the parent club. The other two youngsters, of course, were Tyler Toffoli and Tanner Pearson — both now firmly entrenched in Los Angeles on “That 70s Line.”

The Kings lost veteran depth as well. Colin Fraser left to sign in St. Louis, while free-agent acquisition Adam Cracknell was scooped off waivers by Columbus.

3. It’s really hard to repeat. As most know, there hasn’t been a back-to-back Stanley Cup champion since Detroit turned the trick in 1997 and ’98. Heck, it’s been five years since the defending champion even made it back to the Final — that was Detroit in ’09 — though L.A. and Chicago have come close in recent years.

“It’s probably the toughest trophy to win,” Sutter said at the start of camp, per LA Kings Insider. “To do it back-to-back, especially in the salary cap [era] in a parity league – I mean, if we’d have lost Game 7 to Chicago in the conference finals, then we wouldn’t be talking about it.

“It tells you how close it is.”

Part of that difficulty comes from having a big target on your back. This year, the Kings aren’t defending their title like they did in 2012 — now, they’re the two-time champions (and some people are already throwing around the dynasty label.)

This summer, it seems the rest of the Western Conference adjusted itself accordingly. After watching how much success L.A. had with its four centers — Anze Kopitar, Jeff Carter, Jarret Stoll and Mike Richards — several teams set about adding depth down the middle: Anaheim acquired Ryan Kesler, Dallas traded for Jason Spezza, St. Louis inked Paul Stastny and Chicago signed Brad Richards.

It made for something of an arms race, but the Kings remain convinced their biggest challenge will come from within.

”Seems like the West is loading up, but at the end of the day, I don’t think it’s going to matter much what the other teams do,” Kopitar said, per AP. ”It’s going to matter what we do.”