Tag: Miikka Kiprusoff

Matt Greene #2 of the Los Angeles Kings in action against the New Jersey Devils during Game Five of the 2012 NHL Stanley Cup Final at the Prudential Center on June 9, 2012 in Newark, New Jersey.
(June 8, 2012 - Source: Elsa/Getty Images North America)

PHT Morning Skate: Greene ready to play after elbow surgery


PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

Los Angeles Kings defenseman Matt Greene feels “ready to go” after having elbow surgery over the summer. (LA Kings Insider)

Jordan Eberle, Andrew Ladd, and Sergei Bobrovsky talk about the possibility of playing in the 2014 Winter Olympics. (ESPN.com)

With Ryan Nugent-Hopkins (shoulder) expected to start the 2013-14 campaign on the sidelines, Ryan Smyth might temporarily move up a bit in the depth charts and even get a bit of power-play ice time. (Edmonton Journal)

Philadelphia Flyers prospect Mark Alt suffered a concussion during a rookie game on Monday. The 21-year-old defenseman is entering his first full pro season after spending three seasons with the University of Minnesota. (CSN Philly)

New Jersey Devils goaltending prospect Keith Kinkaid admitted that he was “pretty upset” when he first heard about the Cory Schneider trade, but he’s focused on developing in the minors until he gets his shot. (The Bergen Record)

Looking back at Miikka Kiprusoff’s career as an NHL goaltender. (Flames.nhl.com)

End of an era: Flames announce Kiprusoff retirement

Calgary Flames v Pittsburgh Penguins

The Calgary Flames bid farewell to one of the greatest players in franchise history on Monday, announcing that goalie Miikka Kiprusoff has officially retired.

Here’s the statement from Flames GM Jay Feaster:

“Miikka Kiprusoff has been the backbone of the Calgary Flames since his arrival here in 2003, and every night for more than 70-nights per season, his magnificence between the pipes gave the team a chance to win.

“He inspired hope and confidence, and he made those around him better players as a result of his brilliance.

“Miikka will take his place in the pantheon of great NHL goaltenders, and his place in Flames’ history is secure. He will be missed by players, teammates and fans, and we wish him all the best in his retirement.”

In the release, Feaster also explained that Kiprusoff wanted to finish his career as a Flame — thus explaining why he wasn’t moved at last year’s trade deadline — and that the Flames organization wanted to give the 36-year-old Finn all the time he needed to finalize his decision.

“Had we been prepared to accept Miikka’s position back in April we could have announced his retirement at the end of the season,” Feaster explained. “We purposely chose to wait and give him more time to ensure this was the course he wanted to take.

“In returning to Calgary this month he advised us that his decision remained the same, and that he was retiring as a player.”

Acquired from San Jose in 2003 for a second-round pick, Kiprusoff arrived in Calgary with little fanfare but quickly emerged as a bonafire All-Star.

He backstopped the Flames to the 2004 Stanley Cup Final — losing in seven games to Tampa Bay — and his 2005-06 campaign will go down as one of the finest in franchise history.

Kiprusoff compiled a 42-20-11 record with a 2.07 GAA and .923 save percentage that season, capturing the Vezina and Jennings Trophies, along with a spot on the NHL’s First All-Star team.

He was also nominated for the Hart Trophy as league MVP.

All told, Kiprusoff played nine seasons for Calgary and finishes as the Flames all-time leader in wins (305); games played (576) and shutouts (41).

“I’ve been very lucky to have spent 10 years of my career in Calgary. There is no better place to live and play,” he said. “I look forward to taking the next year with my family to enjoy everything wonderful about southern Alberta.”

Related: Goalie Ramo is wild card for Calgary

Listing the five cheapest goalie tandems in the NHL

Jacob Markstrom

Apropos of nothing but curiosity on our part, here are the five cheapest goaltending tandems for the 2013-14 NHL season, in terms of cap hit.

Florida Panthers ($2.4 million)

Jacob Markstrom ($1.2 million) and Scott Clemmensen ($1.2 million) are slated to share duties for last year’s worst team in the league. The former, just 23 years old, is supposed to be the future in Florida; however, he still has much to prove after a so-so 2013 season in which his save percentage finished at .901. If the duo falters early, it will be interesting to see if general manager Dale Tallon tries to make a move. (No, not for Roberto Luongo; Vancouver kind of needs him now.)

Philadelphia Flyers ($3.15 million)

For: Ray Emery ($1.65 million) and Steve Mason ($1.5 million). As always, Philly’s goalies will be under the microscope. And for good reason. Emery, coming over from Chicago, hasn’t started more than 30 games in a season since 2006-07, while Mason will be trying to resurrect his career after falling on hard times in Columbus. Will the Flyers play a more conservative style to help out their goalies? Remember, this is what Ilya Bryzgalov’s agent said after his client was bought out: “It’s terrible for goaltenders in Philadelphia.”

Calgary Flames ($3.68 million)

Assuming Miikka Kiprusoff retires, which he hasn’t officially done yet, the Flames are expected to go with newcomer Karri Ramo ($2.75 million) and veteran Joey MacDonald ($925,000). Ramo, 27, went 26-9-5 with a .929 save percentage last season for Omsk Avangard. In terms of save percentage, only six KHL goalies were better than that. We’ll see how he does in the best league in the world.

New York Islanders ($3.83 million)

For: Evgeni Nabokov ($3.25 million) and Kevin Poulin ($577,500). This should be interesting. While he was mostly solid during the regular season, Nabokov struggled badly in the playoffs, ending up with a save percentage of .842 in six games versus the Penguins. And at 38 years old, he’s not getting any younger. Meanwhile, Poulin, 23, has a limited NHL resume, with just 17 starts to his name. It’s possible Anders Nilsson, also 23, could beat out Poulin for the backup role, but the inexperience factor would remain.

Tampa Bay Lightning ($4.1 million)

Ben Bishop ($2.3 million) and Anders Lindback ($1.8 million) form the Lightning’s young (and tall) tandem. For their team to make it back to the playoffs following consecutive misses, at least one of them will have to step up. Bishop was acquired at the trade deadline from Ottawa in return for forward Cory Conacher, and heading into training camp, he’s probably the favorite to be the opening-day starter. But that doesn’t mean Lindback can’t win the job. “They are both relatively young, and they each have tremendous upside,” said GM Steve Yzerman. “Over the course of an entire season, it will give both of them an opportunity to play. Having two guys with great potential, they’ll now both be able to develop into the goaltenders we think they can become.”