Tag: Matt Carkner

Lubomir Visnovsky

Visnovsky (concussion) returns after 46-game absence

The New York Islanders’ efforts to claw their way back into the playoff race look a little bit more practical now that defenseman Lubomir Visnovsky is ready to return from a concussion. He will play against the Boston Bruins tonight after spending 46 contests on the sidelines, according to Newsday.

Under better circumstances, Visnovsky is one of the league’s top offensive defensemen and a reliable minutes eater. For now though, the Islanders are expected to err on the side of caution by having him skate alongside Matt Carkner on the team’s third defensive pairing. That should change once he shakes off some of the rust.

Visnovsky was chosen to be a member of Team Slovakia and obviously he’s been able to return with a bit of time to spare before the Olympics. However, the Islanders previously said that they wouldn’t want the 37-year-old blueliner to play in the Winter Games even if he managed to return before the break.

The Islanders also got Evgeni Nabokov (quad strain) back, but he will serve as Kevin Poulin’s understudy tonight.

Update: Visnovsky is paired up with Thomas Hickey rather than Carkner during the Islanders’ pregame warmups.

Capuano: ‘We’re in last place, so no one should be arguing’ about lineup changes

Jack Capuano

The New York Islanders are changing things up for tonight’s date in Detroit, which promoted head coach Jack Capuano to say the following:

That quote came after Capuano announced he was dropping Eric Boulton from the fourth line and replacing him with Colin McDonald, who hasn’t played since Dec. 12 (McDonald received 12 minutes in a 6-3 loss to Phoenix that night, and finished minus-2).

On the blueline, Aaron Ness will draw in while Matt Carkner will sit. Ness has been parked for a while as well, having last played in a 3-2 shootout loss to Tampa Bay on Dec. 17.

The Isles have lost four of five and are coming off a 5-3 home defeat to Anaheim on Saturday — a game in which they held a 3-1 lead going into the third period, before the Ducks rattled off four unanswered goals in the final frame.

New York currently sits last in the Metropolitan Division, with 27 points, and six points clear of cellar-dwellers Buffalo for bottom spot in the Eastern Conference.

Islanders players hold closed-door meeting after ninth straight loss

New York Islanders goalie Kevin Poulin has a shot from Los Angeles Kings center Anze Kopitar, of Slovenia, get by him for a goal during the second period of an NHL hockey game, Saturday, Dec. 7, 2013, in Los Angeles.(AP Photo/Gus Ruelas)

After the New York Islanders lost their eighth straight game, captain John Tavares called on his teammates to have more pride.

“We’re not earning it,” Tavares said at the time.

So what are they saying after their 3-0 loss to the Los Angeles Kings?

The players held a closed-door meeting after dropping their ninth consecutive contest to give each of them an opportunity to speak to the group, according to Newsday. But after going so long without a win, is there really anything that’s been left unsaid?

“It’s a broken record right now,” defenseman Matt Carkner said.

Islanders coach Jack Capuano, whose job might be on the line, suggested that the team’s top line needs to step up and shoot more. He also pointed to their anemic effort with the man advantage as one of the causes for their latest loss.

Meanwhile the team is now 10 points out of a playoff spot, which leaves them with a 0.4% chance of advancing to the postseason, according to Sports Club Stats.

No Clutterbuck, Carkner for Isles Thursday


The New York Islanders will try to get above .500 (6-6-3) on Thursday without winger Cal Clutterbuck and defenseman Matt Carkner.

Clutterbuck suffered an upper-body injury on Nov. 5 while Carkner is a healthy scratch, Newsday’s Arthur Staple reports.

Clutterbuck, 25, is second on the Islanders with 46 hits while missing a few games (he’s played in 12 of 15). Carkner, 33, frequently found himself high on penalty minute lists in Ottawa and racked up 14 against Washington on Tuesday.

Neither seems to be a significant contributor for the Isles, but this does mean they’ll likely boast less snarl in the lineup against the Carolina Hurricanes.

Shanahan: ‘I hate what Ray Emery did’


The NHL’s chief disciplinarian didn’t like what Flyers goalie Ray Emery did Friday versus Washington.

In fact, he “hated” it.

But despite his clear disdain for Emery’s actions — specifically, the ones where Emery skated down the ice to attack Capitals goalie Braden Holtby — Brendan Shanahan didn’t feel it was worth a suspension based on the current NHL rulebook and past supplementary discipline rulings.

“I hate what Ray Emery did,” Shanahan said today on Sportsnet’s Hockey Central. “I wouldn’t like it if I were a teammate of his. I wouldn’t like it if I were an opponent of his. And I think, more important, if the rest of the caretakers of our game, the general managers, don’t like it, it’s important for us to say when a rule is not properly addressed in the rulebook. And I don’t think it is.”

Shanahan did reference the one-game suspension he gave to then-Ottawa player Matt Carkner in April of 2012 for being the aggressor in an altercation with an unwilling opponent, Rangers forward Brian Boyle.

The difference? Shanahan felt the Carkner incident was “much worse” than Friday’s incident, and also noted that Carkner had a history. As such, he couldn’t justify a suspension for Emery, even if Emery was clearly guilty of breaking the aggressor rule (see below).

“If you look at the two [incidents] and line them up, it’s not the same,” said Shanahan.

From the NHL’s rulebook:

46.2 Aggressor – The aggressor in an altercation shall be the player who continues to throw punches in an attempt to inflict punishment on his opponent who is in a defenseless position or who is an unwilling combatant.

A player must be deemed the aggressor when he has clearly won the fight but he continues throwing and landing punches in a further attempt to inflict punishment and/or injury on his opponent who is no longer in a position to defend himself.

A player who is deemed to be the aggressor of an altercation shall be assessed a major penalty for fighting and a game misconduct.

A player who is deemed to be the aggressor of an altercation will have this recorded as an aggressor of an altercation for statistical and suspension purposes.

A player who is deemed to be both the instigator and aggressor of an altercation shall be assessed an instigating minor penalty, a major penalty for fighting, a ten-minute misconduct (instigator) and a game misconduct penalty (aggressor).

Related: NHL to discuss 10-game suspension for goalie fights, per report