Tag: Martin Brodeur

Martin Brodeur

Brodeur: 2014-15 will probably be my last season


Goaltender Martin Brodeur has resisted speculation about his retirement in the past, but at the age of 42 he realizes his career is coming to a close.

“(2014-15 is) going to be probably my last year,” Brodeur told the Bergen Record. “You never know what kind of energy I’m going to get from my decision, but I’m not looking for anything more than one year that’s for sure.”

Brodeur intends to exercise his right to test the unrestricted free agent market, but he hasn’t shut the door on re-signing with New Jersey, if they’ll have him. That’s not the lock it once was because while the Devils would certainly love for him to finish his career with them, they need to fully embrace the Cory Schneider era.

If Brodeur did return for the 2014-15 campaign, it would likely be with the understanding that Schneider would receive far more than the 43 starts he got last season. That might not be something Brodeur would go for if he felt like another team might offer him more playing time.

Whatever happens though, he’s leaving on good terms and with the intention of returning after his playing career is over.

“This organization means everything to me,” he said. “I don’t feel pushed out. I feel appreciated in all ways as far as what I can bring as far as leadership and from the fan base. That’s something that will never go away.

“But, like any competitor, you want to play.”

Done with Devils? Brodeur ‘definitely’ going to free agency

Martin Brodeur

Big news out of New Jersey on Friday as face of the franchise and surefire Hall of Famer Martin Brodeur has announced he’s going to hit free agency.

“I’ve come to the conclusion that I’m definitely going to be available July 1,” Brodeur told ESPN.com. “I want to play one more season and I want to see what’s out there.”

The news comes on the same day New Jersey’s other goalie, Cory Schneider, said he wanted assurances he’d be the clear-cut No. 1 for the Devils after splitting games with Brodeur this year.

Schneider also holds some leverage, given he’s an unrestricted free agent following this season.

“It’s a discussion about if they want me to be the guy going forward, we have to figure out that part of it,” Schneider said, per the Star-Ledger. “I’m probably 50 or 75 games short of where I would have liked to be as far as career games-played. That’s a result of splitting the time in goal in Vancouver as well as last year.

“I was hoping to step into that (No. 1 role) maybe a little earlier.”

Brodeur, 42, has spent his entire 23-year career with the Devils, winning three Stanley Cups and four Vezina Trophies. He’s also the NHL’s all-time leader in games played, wins and shutouts.

In light of all that, it’ll be very interesting to see who takes a chance on Brodeur this summer — or, if someone takes a chance. Brodeur hasn’t ruled out a return to the Devils entirely, but feels the club needs to move forward with Schneider and his presence in New Jersey could make that difficult. As for other teams, Brodeur said he’d accept a No. 2 gig on a team “that has a really good chance to win a Stanley Cup,” and didn’t rule out the possibility of challenging for a starting job elsewhere.

“If I go for a No. 1 job, it’s going to depend on the situation,” he explained. “I think there are teams that can use me.”

Worth noting that teams could be leery of bringing Brodeur on as a No. 2. His presence might make the starter’s life much more difficult, in the sense of fans/media calling for a switch in goal at the first sign of the No. 1 struggling. (This is a variant of the always-popular “put in the backup QB” shout, which is often followed by the “oh, that’s why he’s the backup” shout.)

Regardless, the Brodeur-going-to-market narrative will be a fun one to monitor over the next three weeks.

Schneider wants assurances he’s No. 1 in New Jersey


To say Cory Schneider has waited patiently to become a full-time NHL starter would be an understatement. Now 28 years old, and with the ability to become an unrestricted free agent next summer, it doesn’t sound like he’s willing to go through another goalie soap opera, like the one he endured in Vancouver with Roberto Luongo, or the one he was traded into when he was dealt last summer to New Jersey, where Devils legend Martin Brodeur was still employed.

Per The Star-Ledger, Schneider wants assurances that he’s the undisputed No. 1 before he signs a contract extension with the Devils.

“It’s a discussion about if they want me to be the guy going forward, we have to figure out that part of it,” Schneider told the paper.

“I’m probably 50 or 75 games short of where I would have liked to be as far as career games-played. That’s a result of splitting the time in goal in Vancouver as well as last year. I was hoping to step into that (No. 1 role) maybe a little earlier.”

Among active goalies with at least 100 NHL starts, only Boston’s Tuukka Rask has a higher career save percentage (.928) than Schneider (.925).

Back in April, Devils general manager Lou Lamoriello said that getting Schneider signed to an extension was “right on the top of” of his to-do list.

Brodeur is a pending UFA. The 42-year-old has said he’s ready to test free agency if the Devils don’t want him back.

Get your game notes: Rangers at Kings

New York Rangers v Los Angeles Kings

Tonight on NBC, it’s the Los Angeles Kings hosting the New York Rangers at 8 p.m. ET in the first game of the 2014 Stanley Cup Final. Following are some game notes, as compiled by the NHL on NBC research team:

• The Kings needed an NHL-record 21 games to reach the Stanley Cup Final, while the Rangers needed 20. The NHL record for games played in an entire postseason is 26 games, done by two teams, the Flyers in 1987 and Flames (coached by current Kings coach Darryl Sutter) in 2004. Both of those teams lost in seven games in the Stanley Cup Final, Philadelphia to Edmonton (coached by current Rangers GM Glen Sather) and Calgary to Tampa Bay (led by current Rangers Martin St. Louis and Brad Richards.)

• The Kings will have home-ice advantage for the first time in franchise history in the Stanley Cup Final (three series), and just the second time overall since the beginning of the 1993 Stanley Cup playoffs (22 series). The only other time Los Angeles started a series at home during that span was in the 2013 Western Conference Semifinals vs. San Jose, a series the Kings won in seven games.

• The Stanley Cup Final will feature two of the top goaltenders in the NHL: Henrik Lundqvist and Jonathan Quick. In the last three postseasons (since 2012), Quick leads the NHL in playoff games played (59), wins (37) and shutouts (7), while posting a 2.05 GAA and .928 save%. During that span, Lundqvist is second in playoff games played (52) and shutouts (6), and third in wins (27), with a 1.98 GAA and .931 save%.

• In Game 1, Lundqvist will be making his 87th straight playoff start between the pipes. He has started every game for the Rangers since Game 3 of the 2006 Eastern Conference Quarterfinal series vs. New Jersey. Lundqvist, who set the franchise record for career playoff wins (42) in Game 6 of the Eastern Conference Final, ranks third all-time for most consecutive playoff starts by a goalie for one team. Elias Sports Bureau

Consecutive goalie starts, with one team (playoffs, before Game 1)

194 (active) – Martin Brodeur (NJ)
133 – Patrick Roy (COL)
86 (active) – Lundqvist (NYR)
79 – Marc-Andre Fleury (PIT)
78 – Jacques Plante (MTL)

• The Rangers and Kings have the same number of goals from their top four centers this postseason, but the Kings have a substantial edge in points and faceoff percentage.


• St. Louis (6-7—13), Stepan (5-8—13) and Ryan McDonagh (3-10—13) lead the Rangers in scoring this postseason. Five different Kings players have 16 or more points: Kopitar (5-19—24, leads playoffs), Carter (9-13—22), Marian Gaborik (12-7—19), Justin Williams (7-11—18) and Drew Doughty (4-12—16). During the Conference Finals, Carter (5-6-11) and McDonagh (2-8—10) led all players in points.

• The Rangers are 34/36 (94.4%) on the penalty kill in their last 11 games (five vs. Pittsburgh, six vs. Montreal). They will face a stiff challenge from a Kings team that has at least one power-play goal in seven of nine home games this postseason and is 9/30 (30.0%) overall on home ice.

• Since the Stanley Cup Final went to a best-of-7 format in 1939, Game 1 winners have won 57 of 74 series (77.0%). In their most recent Cup Final appearances, the Rangers (1994) lost Game 1 at home to Vancouver (3-2, OT), while the Kings (2012) won Game 1 away to New Jersey (2-1, OT); both teams later won those series. In the last five Cup Finals, the winner of Game 1 has lost two of those series: the Detroit Red Wings vs. Pittsburgh in 2009 and the Vancouver Canucks (coached by current Rangers coach Alain Vigneault) vs. Boston in 2011. This postseason, the Rangers are 3-0 in Game 1s, while the Kings are 1-2.

Schneider/Brodeur redux? DeBoer ready for it just in case

Cory Schneider, Martin Brodeur

If the New Jersey Devils bring back future Hall of Fame goalie Martin Brodeur next season, coach Peter DeBoer is prepared for it just in case.

For the first time in his career, Brodeur was outperformed by a teammate. In this case it was Cory Schneider who put up superior numbers and earned more starts. Brodeur spoke often about how he might need to go elsewhere next season if the Devils don’t want him back.

If Brodeur does return to Newark, the coach won’t be caught off guard as Rich Chere of The Star-Ledger shares.

“Those decisions are made above me, but if Lou (Lamoriello) and Marty decide that it’s best for everybody, absolutely we’d welcome him back,” DeBoer said.

“If those two decide it’s in the best interests of everybody that he comes back, of course we’d welcome him back. I mean, why wouldn’t we? He’s a great teammate, a great pro.”

It’s clear at this point in his career that Brodeur, 42, is more of a backup than a starter. His numbers compared to Schneider’s last season bore that out. Brodeur stopped pucks at a decidedly average .901 clip while Schneider did so at a .921 save percentage.

Brodeur still has the desire and the wont to start, but it might make more sense for the Devils to give Schneider more starts than he had last season if they want to return to the playoffs.