Tag: Mark Recchi

Chris Phillips, John Mitchell

Chris Phillips thinks Mark Recchi is “uninformed” about labor situation


Mark Recchi speaking his mind about the players needing to settle with the NHL now and take their most recent offer isn’t sitting well.

Ken Warren from Senators Extra hears it from Ottawa defenseman Chris Phillips that Recchi doesn’t seem to know what he’s talking about.

“I guess I would say it’s an uninformed answer, unless he’s now tied in with ownership somewhere or wants to get involved with ownership and trying to take that side,” said Phillips, the Senators player representative. “Unless you’re on the calls and know what’s going on all the time, I don’t know what those comments are based on. Because he’s not involved.”

First it was Recchi being criticized for his take on concussions and now this. Going from a doctor to a lawyer is rough.

For what it’s worth, Phillips has had an active role in CBA negotiations and he’s clearly protective over what the players are trying to do, but Recchi isn’t the only former player encouraging the current players to get a deal done ASAP.

Recchi on lockout: Time for players “to think like businessmen”

Mark Recchi

Mark Recchi has a message for locked-out NHL players — get a deal done now, because the owner’s offers won’t get any better.

That’s what the former Bruin told the Boston Globe, explaining that players need to “think like businessmen” as the lockout approaches Day 60.

“The longer it goes, the worse [the offer] is going to get [for the players],” he said. “Hey, I’m an owner, too, so I see both sides. We lose money on our team, and obviously that’s not the same, the money’s not nearly as significant as in the NHL, but the business dynamics are similar. We’ve lost money every year we’ve owned it.’’

Recchi is a part owner of the WHL’s Kamloops Blazers. That, along with his lengthy playing career, gives him a unique perspective regarding work stoppages.

He was in Philadelphia for the strike of 1992, in Montreal for the 1995 lockout and signed with Pittsburgh out of the 2004-05 lost season (he was eventually traded to Carolina that year, and won the Cup with the ‘Canes.)

Recchi says that, based solely on the numbers, it makes sense for players to resume playing.

“The longer they’re out, the revenues are going to go down and down,’’ he said. “Corporate sponsors aren’t going to be lining up . . . so there goes that money. The schedule isn’t going to be 82 games, I don’t think, at this point. That’s more money lost.

“So, how are you going to get a better deal? Personally, I think the best time is now.”

Recchi also made a salient point about the perception of “winning” and “losing” negotiations.

The NHLPA was largely considered to be the latter after the last CBA, yet eventually emerged with a number of massive salaries and a 57 percent share of record revenues.

“Look at that last deal,” he said. “We ended up with the cap and everyone thought it was a bad deal. But it ended up great, right?

“No matter what the system is, or has been, the players get their money.”

Rolston reacts to redemption: “More than any words can say”

Boston Bruins v Ottawa Senators

Sports fans might know that putting on the New York Yankees’ pinstripes can rejuvenate a player, but the Boston Bruins’ “spoked-B” could have similar results. Mark Recchi was one of the team’s leading scorers in his final season during the 2011 Stanley Cup run, yet Brian Rolston’s twilight tide turn is even more surprising.

Kirk Luedeke caught up with Rolston, who has three points in three playoff contests, a five-game points streak and 17 points in 15 games since March 15.

Asked Brian Rolston after the game how gratifying it was to be back in Boston- he paused & then quietly said: “More than any words can say.”

Rolston admitted that he might have been too young to appreciate his Stanley Cup run with the New Jersey Devils all the way back in 1995. Scoring 17 points in 15 games is impressive in just about any context, but considering the fact that Rolston’s career seemed flat-out over with the New York Islanders during this same season, his turnaround is nothing short of stunning.

And much like Recchi’s last hurrah, it could be worth savoring.

Canadiens make Max Pacioretty their Masterton nominee

Max Pacioretty

Not a whole lot has gone right for the Montreal Canadiens this season, yet one story shines as an undeniable inspiration. The Habs decided to name Max Pacioretty as their candidate for the 2012 Bill Masterton Trophy.

In case you’re unfamiliar, the trophy is awarded to the player “who best exemplifies the qualities of perseverance, sportsmanship and dedication to hockey.” Pacioretty has had his run-ins with Brendan Shanahan’s disciplinary committee this season so maybe the sportsmanship part might not be his strong suit, but the other two factors have been on full display.

(To be fair regarding the Kris Letang hit, Pacioretty showed class in immediately apologizing for the check.)

After withstanding an incredibly unlucky hit from Zdeno Chara last season, many would find it hard to believe that Pacioretty would bounce back to score 30 goals and 27 assists for 57 points this season. In fact, some wondered if he’d ever play (or even walk) again.

(Mark Recchi wasn’t in that club.)

His season’s certainly been an example of perseverance, so the Habs probably didn’t need to deliberate the choice for very long. Who are some other players from other teams who come to mind as good candidates for the award, though?

Recchi the latest to express regret over ripping the Canucks

Mark Recchi

Just two days prior to the 2011 Stanley Cup rematch between Boston and Vancouver, former Bruin Mark Recchi expressed regret for saying the Canucks were the most arrogant and hated team he’d ever played against.

“I probably shouldn’t have said anything and I wish I wouldn’t have, but that’s what happened and that’s how the series was,” Recchi told The Province. “People know I love B.C. and Vancouver and it was an unbelievable series but there was a lot of dislike on both sides. And it wouldn’t have been a Stanley Cup final if there wasn’t that much dislike — we really didn’t like each other.”

Recchi made his comments on Boston’s 98.5 the Sports Hub back in November. Since then, the trend of dissing the Canucks on local radio — then catching heat for it, then backing off — has really caught on.

In December, Chicago forward Dave Bolland went on WGN Radio and called Daniel and Henrik Sedin “the sisters” before adding Vancouver “[has] a lot of weirdos there.” When his comments came under scrutiny, Bolland explained they were tongue-in-cheek and that he had the utmost respect for the Sedins and the organization.

After his comments, Recchi also had some ‘splaining to do — mostly trying to justify how he could rank the Canucks as the most hated opponent of his 22-year career.

“There was a lot of passion and fire. We had a tough time in the Tampa series because we couldn’t find people to dislike,” Recchi said. “[The Canucks] were a confident group and they handled themselves that way on the ice. We thrived on it because we didn’t like them because of that. It gave us that little extra motivation.”

Publicly, the Canucks haven’t been as responsive to Recchi as they were to Bolland, though defenseman Kevin Bieksa couldn’t resist throwing in his two cents.

“I just don’t get it,” Bieksa said (back in November). “Isn’t [Recchi] retired? Tell him to go play a round of golf or take a nap.”