Tag: Mark Giordano

Brent Seabrook

Poll: Will Seabrook re-sign?


In Chicago, conversation about the cost of keeping the team together never really ends.

Having just come off a summer in which Brandon Saad, Brad Richards, Johnny Oduya and Patrick Sharp all exited due to financial constraints, the ‘Hawks can now begin looking ahead to next July, when another prized player could go unrestricted:

Brent Seabrook.

Seabrook, 30, is heading into the last of a five-year, $29 million deal with a $5.8M cap hit. His resume is loaded — three Stanley Cups, Olympic gold, a ’15 All-Star Game appearance — and he’s coming off a postseason in which he led all defensemen in goals (seven), the same number that Tampa Bay captain Steve Stamkos potted.

So needless to say, he’d be coveted on the open market.

There are two sides to this discussion. The first is why Seabrook would want to stay in Chicago, and it’s a fairly easy sell — it’s the only team he’s ever known, having been drafted by the ‘Hawks in the first round in ’03. He’s since appeared in over 800 games in a ‘Hawks sweater during his 10-year career, and developed a dynamic pairing with fellow blueliner (and one of his best friends) Duncan Keith.

Seabrook also has, as mentioned above, achieved a boatload of success with the ‘Hawks.

But there are reasons why he’d leave.

Well, one big reason — the money.

Per war-on-ice.com, the ‘Hawks already have close to $60 million committed to 16 players after this season. While there aren’t many other noteworthy contracts on the horizon — Andrew Shaw will require a new deal in ’16-17, Teuvo Teravainen and Marko Dano the year after — there is a question of how much Chicago can pay Seabrook.

Do consider that, a few weeks ago, Calgary gave Mark Giordano — who’s a year older than Seabrook — a six year, $40.5 million extension that carries a $6.75M cap hit. Earlier this summer, TSN speculated that Seabrook “is due to earn at least Dion Phaneuf-type money, in the neighborhood of seven years and $49 million.”

Those are both pretty steep AAVs but, given the dearth of quality UFA defensemen that usually hit the market, they could be in Seabrook’s wheelhouse. Remember that Mike Green got $6M per from Detroit this summer, while Andrej Sekera got $33 million over five years from the Oilers.

If Seabrook doesn’t sign an extension prior to the season starting, you can expect this conversation to pick up steam as the year progresses.

But why wait for that? Let’s vote and discuss now.

Gio won’t go: Flames extend Giordano for six years, $40.5M

Anaheim Ducks v Calgary Flames

It seemed like the Calgary Flames were going to have a big elephant in the room regarding Mark Giordano’s expiring contract next season. They removed that problem in a huge way on Tuesday.

The Flames announced a six-year contract extension for the Norris-caliber defenseman. Multiple outlets including TSN’s Bob McKenzie report that the cap hit will be $6.75 million, which would make the deal worth $40.5 million overall.

That contract will kick in beginning in 2016-17, making Giordano the highest-paid member of the Flames. He’ll make the same $6.75 million for each year of that deal, according to The Canadian Press’ Stephen Whyno.

While that’s an expensive deal out of context, that cap hit is quite the steal if Giordano remains one of the best defensemen in the NHL, which was absolutely a fair label for the veteran in 2014-15 before his season was cut short by injury.

(Really, you couldn’t hear Norris talk around awards season without “it would have been Giordano if he didn’t get hurt” …)

Here’s one additional detail about the contract, via General Fanager:

The Flames now boast a tremendous group of blueliners signed to long-term deals:

Giordano: $4.02 million in 2015-16, $6.75 million through 2021-22
Dougie Hamilton: $5.75M through 2020-21
TJ Brodie: $4.65M through 2019-20

Slight concerns amid a mostly joyous situation

Now, this does leave a few questions. Is someone like Dennis Wideman going to be the odd man out? Will this make it more difficult to re-sign the fantastic trio of Jiri Hudler (UFA), Johnny Gaudreau (RFA) and Sean Monahan (RFA) after 2015-16?

You really have to strain to see the downside for the Flames, however, as this is a bargain by expensive, high-end defensemen terms.

The genuine worry is age. Giordano is 31, he’ll turn 32 in October and will be 33 around the time his next contact kicks in.

With that “price of doing business” concern out of the way, it’s ultimately a pretty fantastic deal for the Flames.

Under Pressure: Dougie Hamilton

Dougie Hamilton

First, there was the big trade.

Then, the big contract.

Now? The big expectations.

That’s what d-man Dougie Hamilton faces this season, his first in Calgary, after this summer’s blockbuster move from Boston and his subsequent contract — all six years and $34.5 million of it.

“I think the expectations are going to be higher,” Hamilton admitted earlier this summer, per the Calgary Sun. “But I think in Boston there’s a lot of scrutiny from fans and expectations for me when I came in, being a top-10 pick.

“I think I handled that fine and think it’ll be the same here, just have fun and play my game.”

Though the Flames and GM Brad Treliving have been quick to classify the 22-year-old Hamilton as an “emerging talent” and remind everyone he’s still young, there will be pressure on Hamilton produce, probably more than the 10 goals and 42 points he notched in Boston last year (which, by most measures, was a pretty productive season.)

There’s also that price tag.

At $5.75 million, Hamilton will be the highest-paid Flame — at least in terms of cap hit — next season. That’s ahead of a slew of older, more experienced veterans, including captain and team leader Mark Giordano (who, it must be mentioned, needs a new deal himself) and last year’s leading scorer, Jiri Hudler.

As for other challenges? Oh, you know: Develop rapport with a different defensive partner, get comfortable in new surroundings, make the switch from Eastern to Western Conference and establish a relationship with a fairly demanding head coach. Stuff that most veteran players would find overwhelming, let alone a guy with less than 200 NHL games on his resume.

Which is probably why Hamilton, like Treliving, also trying to temper expectations.

“You can’t really put too much pressure on yourself, better to just do your best and try to be as consistent as you can,” he explained. “It’s interesting. I’m still 22 and there’s a long future ahead, so I think there’s a lot of development.

“I think I have that ceiling that hasn’t been hit and hopefully do my best to reach my potential.”