Tag: Mandi Schwartz

2010 NHL Draft Portraits

St. Louis Blues prospect Jaden Schwartz hopes to honor his sister Mandi

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It was inspiring to see the hockey world get behind Mandi Schwartz and even more inspiring to read about her courageous battle with cancer. Sadly, she couldn’t win that battle with leukemia in the long run, though, as the disease caused her death in April.

One of her most passionate supporters was her brother, St. Louis Blues prospect Jaden Schwartz. The 14th overall pick of the 2010 NHL Entry Draft has been forced to deal with that tragic situation and some personal hockey-related bad luck as well, as his time with last year’s Canadian World Junior Championship team was cut short last year thanks to a broken ankle.

Redemption seemed to be on Jaden’s mind when he discussed having another spot at the WJC next season during the team’s summer training camp, but honoring Mandi – and taking inspiration from her resilience – seemed like it was on the forefront. The winger said that much when he discussed his goals with the media.

“From here on out, this tournament, this camp — everything is for (my sister),” Schwartz told NHL.com following the opening day of Canada’s development camp at Rexall Place. “While I’m obviously trying to do this for me, my family and for Canada; most of all, it’s for her.”


“She was everything to me,” Schwartz said. “She was a huge inspiration in every aspect of life, whether it was hockey or the way she treated people. She kind of touched everybody, especially when she got sick; she never complained about a thing and kept fighting. She kept believing and, every chance she’d get, she’d go for a workout or skate despite being sick — it was awesome.”

Jaden will play his second year of college hockey as well next season, where he’ll join his older brother Rylan Schwartz for another campaign with Colorado College. It might be hard for fans of Colorado College’s rivals – and maybe someday the Blues’ bitterest opponents – to root against a guy like Jaden Schwartz.

Yale hockey player and inspiration Mandi Schwartz loses her battle with leukemia at 23


Yale women’s hockey player Mandi Schwartz has lost her battle with leukemia at the age of 23.

Schwartz has battled the blood disease for the last two years and it’s a fight that has inspired hockey fans and people around North America. Schwartz’s story and the work that she and her family put into informing the public about the disease rallied support for her cause in hopes that one day help find a cure. After a recent turn for the worse, hopes reached their lowest and unfortunately Mandi’s battle ended today.

Mandi’s brothers Jaden and Rylan Schwartz currently play for Colorado College in the NCAA and Jaden is a first round choice of the St. Louis Blues in 2010. Jaden’s presence as a first round pick helped shed more light on Mandi’s story and the St. Louis Blues expressed their condolences to the Schwartz family today.

“From the entire St. Louis Blues organization, our thoughts and prayers are with the Schwartz family during this difficult time,” said Blues President John Davidson.

Mandi’s story has been an inspiring one and ultimately a heartbreaking one given her fate succumbing to the disease. Her efforts in raising awareness of her condition and trying to help those in her position with trying to fund research and search for donors have been brave and we can only hope that her efforts will continue on now with the battle that she brought attention to for others in her position.

Jaden Schwartz will miss rest of WJC tournament with fractured ankle

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Sad news for Jaden Schwartz today, something that the young player and his family is unfortunately getting used to. The St. Louis Blues prospect and Team Canada player fractured his ankle, an injury that will sideline him for six weeks (which means that he will miss the rest of the 2011 World Junior Championships among other games).

It’s been a tough few weeks for Schwartz, as the family faced the tough news that his sister Mandi’s cancer returned after a stem cell transplant. The former Yale women’s hockey player has been fighting cancer for two years now, so this latest development must be hard for the Schwartz family to take.

Hopefully 2011 will bring better news and better health for Jaden and Mandi Schwartz because 2010 didn’t end well. Our best wishes go out to their family.

Yale’s ‘White Out for Mandi’ raises over $9K for Schwartz’s fight against cancer

There have been a lot of highs and lows in Mandi Schwartz’s battle against cancer. The younger sister of St. Louis Blues’ first round draft pick Jaden Schwartz most recently received a crucial stem cell transplant, a surgery she reportedly is recovering from in Seattle.

Consider Friday one of the highs for the resilient former Yale hockey player. Yale university organized a special “White Out for Mandi” rally against RPI, generating more than $9,000 for her cause.

NHL.com has more on the heartwarming story.

The Yale University women’s hockey team and a record crowd of 1,066 jammed Ingalls Rink to pay tribute to Mandi Schwartz and her incredible two-year battle against cancer during “White Out for Mandi,” on Friday in New Haven, Conn.

“It was really special … there were a ton of former and current students and it was an incredible atmosphere,” Yale junior forward Aleca Hughes told NHL.com. “I was so proud to be associated with such an event for such a special human being. We all admire Mandi and the challenges she’s overcome — it’s just too bad we couldn’t win the hockey game.”

According to Sam Rubin of Yale Sports Publicity, the event raised more than $9,000 for Mandi and her family. Despite the fact Yale suffered a 4-1 loss to Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, the evening was a huge success as the players and coaches had been planning the “White Out” for weeks. Silent auctions were held for autographed Bobby Orr memorabilia and a jersey from Boston Red Sox slugger David Ortiz. Additionally, white T-shirts with Mandi’s number 17 were sold throughout the week and at the game.

The previous high attendance for a Yale women’s hockey home game is believed to be 825, for a playoff game against Princeton in March 2005.

Their opponent RPI also did their part, raising $1,000 for the event. Here are a few more details from the event.

In addition to honoring Mandi with pregame speeches from Yale teammates Alyssa Clarke and Berit Johnson, Yale also introduced the newest member of their team, Giana, a 9-year-old Yale-New Haven Hospital patient the Bulldogs have adopted. Giana, who is recovering from surgery to remove a brain tumor, dropped the ceremonial first puck after Yale captain Samantha MacLean accepted a check for $1,000 from RPI on Mandi’s behalf. The Engineers held a fund-raiser of their own last weekend.