Tag: Logan Couture

Los Angeles Kings v San Jose Sharks - Game Seven

It’s San Jose Sharks day on PHT


You can pretty much sum up San Jose’s 2013-14 campaign with two words:

The collapse.

In the opening playoff round against Los Angeles, the Sharks became just the fourth team in NHL history to blow a 3-0 series lead, the most disappointing playoff defeat for a franchise that knows plenty about them. The loss was so gut-wrenching, in fact, Logan Couture said the bitter feelings will “probably never” go away.

The collapse also started what’s been one of the most dramatic and, at times, dysfunctional offseasons in franchise history. After GM Doug Wilson and owner Hasso Plattner decided to retain the front office and coaching staffs, things got dramatic.

A sampling of PHT headlines from this summer:

GM Wilson suggests Sharks might need to ‘take one step backwards’

Kings could see fear in Sharks’ eyes before comeback

Sharks GM Wilson: ‘We now become a tomorrow team’

Columnist: Sharks are ‘having a bit of a nervous breakdown right now’

‘I want players that want to play here, not just live here,’ says San Jose GM

Marleau: Remarks that Sharks aren’t tight-knit not ‘a big thing’

Then came the moves.

Veteran d-man Dan Boyle wasn’t retained. Martin Havlat was bought out of his contract, Brad Stuart was traded to Colorado and Brent Burns was returned to defense.

But Wilson didn’t stop there.

Seemingly fixated on beefing up, Wilson re-signed tough guy Mike Brown and inked journeymen pugilists John Scott and Micheal Haley in free agency. This was, of course, with San Jose already employing the likes of Andrew Desjardins, Adam Burish and Raffi Torres. Then, sticking with the “tomorrow team” narrative, San Jose retained a number of its young players — Tommy Wingels, James Sheppard, Jason Demers and Alex Stalock.

But perhaps the biggest and most telling moves Wilson made… were the ones he didn’t make. Joe Thornton and Patrick Marleau were retained despite rumors swirling around both; in early July, the Sharks actually brought back a longstanding veteran in blueliner Scott Hannan.

In the end, the offseason left people with more questions than answers, especially when it came to explaining what the Sharks were doing. Is this a re-build? A re-tool? A culture change?

We’ll spend most of today trying to figure it out.

Couture hopes ‘devastating loss’ can motivate Sharks

Vancouver Canucks v San Jose Sharks

Before the San Jose Sharks did it in the 2014 playoffs, the last NHL team to blow a 3-0 series lead, the 2010 Boston Bruins, went on to win the Stanley Cup the following year.

Logan Couture is hoping the Sharks can do in 2015 what the B’s did in 2011.

“Obviously it was tough, the way we finished last year, but I’m really hoping this summer guys build off it and come back a lot stronger, a lot hungrier,” Couture told Sportsnet 590 The Fan today. “It’s probably the toughest loss I’ve been through… It was pretty devastating. It’s really stuck with me the whole summer.”

Couture also went to bat for Joe Thornton, saying the Sharks’ captain “doesn’t deserve the heat that he’s taken” in the wake of San Jose’s most recent, and most painful, postseason disappointment.

San Jose kicks off the 2014-15 regular season on Oct. 8 in Los Angeles, where the Kings — the team that fought back to eliminate the Sharks — will raise their second Stanley Cup banner in three years (on NBCSN).

Related: Wilson explains the ‘rebuild’ in San Jose

Wilson explains the ‘rebuild’ in San Jose

Doug Wilson

When hockey fans hear the word “rebuild,” they usually think of a team like the Edmonton Oilers. Haven’t made the playoffs since 2006. Three first overall picks in a row from 2010 to 2012. The plan in Edmonton was to be bad, and rebuild a winner through the draft. It hasn’t quite worked out that way, but that was the plan.

That’s not the plan in San Jose, according to general manager Doug Wilson. But make no mistake, the Sharks are still rebuilding.

“I can understand when people say there are different types of rebuild,” Wilson told the Mercury News. “We’re not going to finish last to try and draft people first or second. This is not something this franchise can do, because we already have some good players in key positions. You’re not going to see us with 50 points next year — we’re too good a team for that.”

Instead, Wilson says the Sharks need to rebuild their culture and become a more tightly knit group — a plan that includes giving more leadership and team-building responsibilities to young players like Joe Pavelski, Logan Couture, Marc-Edouard Vlasic and Justin Braun.

Where that leaves veterans Joe Thornton and Patrick Marleau is, of course, the big question. Both have no-movement clauses and don’t want to leave San Jose, where they’re under contract through 2016-17. But Wilson has made it clear — perhaps in an attempt to convince them to accept a trade — that they’re not priorities anymore.

“The rebuild is committed to,” Wilson said in June. “The players that fit for now and the future, their growth is going to be the primary thing.”

Related: McLellan doesn’t rule out stripping Thornton of ‘C’

Rookie Mountain High: Avs’ MacKinnon wins Calder


For the second time in three years, the Calder Trophy is going to Denver.

Colorado Avalanche rookie Nathan MacKinnon captured the league’s rookie of the year award on Tuesday night, beating out Tampa Bay teammates Ondrej Palat and Tyler Johnson for the honor. With the win, MacKinnon joined Avs captain Gabriel Landeskog as a Calder winner (Landeskog captured his in 2011-12) and just the ninth player in NHL history to win the trophy after being selected No. 1 overall, joining the likes of Gilbert Perreault, Denis Potvin, Bobby Smith, Dale Hawerchuk, Mario Lemieux, Bryan Berard, Alex Ovechkin and Patrick Kane.

Though Palat and Johnson had solid years, MacKinnon was a runaway Calder winner given his tremendous regular season — the former QMJHL Halifax star topped all first-year players in points (63), goals (24-tied), assists (39), power-play goals (8), game-winning goals (5-tied) and shots (241) this year.

Here are the voting results for the top 10 candidates:

Pts. (1st-2nd-3rd-4th-5th)
1. Nathan MacKinnon, COL 1347 (130-6-1-0-0)
2. Ondrej Palat, TB 791 (5-78-29-15-5)
3. Tyler Johnson, TB 352 (0-13-29-30-26)
4. Torey Krug, BOS 287 (1-9-23-25-24)
5. Olli Maatta, PIT 225 (0-11-18-16-10)
6. Jacob Trouba, WPG 213 (1-11-17-9-14)
7. Hampus Lindholm, ANA 208 (0-7-15-22-18)
8. Sean Monahan, CGY 38 (0-2-2-3-5)
9. Frederik Andersen, ANA 25 (0-0-0-4-13)
10. Chris Kreider, NYR 20 (0-0-1-3-6)

To little surprise, MacKinnon ran away with the voting. In case you’re wondering, Nashville Predators defenseman Seth Jones came in 11th.

Take a look at the Calder Trophy winners and runners up since 1990:

Year Winner Runner-up
2014 Nathan MacKinnon, Col. Ondrej Palat, T.B.
2013 Jonathan Huberdeau, Fla. B. Gallagher, Mtl.
2012 Gabriel Landeskog, Col. R. Nugent-Hopkins, Edm.
2011 Jeff Skinner, Car. Logan Couture, S.J.
2010 Tyler Myers, Buf. Jimmy Howard, Det.
2009 Steve Mason, CBJ Bobby Ryan, Ana
2008 Patrick Kane, Chi. N. Backstrom, Wsh
2007 Evgeni Malkin, Pit. Paul Stastny, Col.
2006 Alex Ovechkin, Wsh. Sidney Crosby, Pit.
2004 Andrew Raycroft, Bos. Michael Ryder, Mtl.
2003 Barret Jackman, St.L Henrik Zetterberg, Det.
2002 Dany Heatley, Atl. Ilya Kovalchuk, Atl.
2001 Evgeni Nabokov, S.J. Brad Richards, T.B.
2000 Scott Gomez, N.J. Brad Stuart, S.J.
1999 Chris Drury, Col. Marian Hossa, Ott.
1998 Sergei Samsonov, Bos. Mattias Ohlund, Van.
1997 Bryan Berard, NYI Jarome Iginla, Cgy.
1996 Daniel Alfredsson, Ott. Eric Daze, Chi.
1995 Peter Forsberg, Que. Jim Carey, Wsh.
1994 Martin Brodeur, N.J. Jason Arnott, Edm.
1993 Teemu Selanne, Wpg. Joe Juneau, Bos.
1992 Pavel Bure, Van. Nicklas Lidstrom, Det.
1991 Ed Belfour, Chi. Sergei Fedorov, Det.
1990 Sergei Makarov, Cgy. Mike Modano, Min.


Can Sharks fix team culture without moving ‘alpha male’ Thornton?

Los Angeles Kings v San Jose Sharks - Game Seven

San Jose Sharks GM Doug Wilson isn’t shy about saying that he wants to make significant changes after the Los Angeles Kings “reverse swept” his team out of the playoffs. Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman takes it one step further, though: they aren’t just listening to offers for Joe Thornton … they want him out.

Friedman said as much on Vancouver’s Team 1040 on Thursday, with the Sharks material kicking in around the 11-minute mark of Hour 3. The Score transcribed the juiciest bits:

See the thing I think really happened there is that Joe Thornton is, like, he’s such a dominant personality. He’s an alpha male. He’s a guy who likes to talk, and likes to ride people… But I think if you really want to (give) the room to Logan Couture and Joe Pavelski, y’know, it’s tough to do that with him there.

I think if they told Thornton, “you’re not the alpha male on this team anymore” I think he would try to do it. I think he really wants to be there and really wants to win there. I’m just not convinced that the organization believes that it can be done with him still there.

In a way, it’s odd to see Thornton labeled as an “alpha male” considering the fact that he’s often been depicted as an easy-going guy. (Then again, there was that Tomas Hertl comment …)

While he didn’t come out and officially back up Friedman’s comments, there’s little doubt that Wilson believes there are some chemistry issues at work.

CSNBayArea.com captured one of the more eyebrow-raising comments the embattled GM made during an NHL Network interview on Friday:

“It’s partly the people, it’s party the environment, it’s partly how they’re managed and coached. It’s a combination of all those things,” Wilson said. “There’s teams in this league that are very talented teams. But, why do you finish it off [like] the San Antonio Spurs in basketball, and the L.A. Kings? They were a close team and did all those little things for each other. Sometimes the pilot light goes out, sometimes there’s injuries, sometimes people need to look in the mirror and wake up again. That’s usually what you’re looking at. But, it comes back to teammate-to-teammate, saying, ‘you know what? I’ll be there for you.’ And, we didn’t have it.”

Earlier this week, Wilson described the Sharks as a “tomorrow team.” As far as how that might affect Thornton and Marleau, Wilson said ” … it’s very simple – if it doesn’t fit for you guys, let’s sit and discuss it.” You know, it sorta sounds like Wilson is trying to sell the merits of trading for one or both of those veterans while also trying to convince Thornton and/or Marleau to waive their no-movement clauses.

Here is full video of that interview (skip to about the four-minute mark for the good stuff):

Thornton’s brother/agent indicated that he’d be more willing to leave San Jose if the fans turned on him, but what about his teammates and the Sharks front office?

Maybe cooler heads will eventually prevail, but it’s difficult to deny the notion that the Sharks are having a “nervous breakdown” right now. The question is: will Thornton and Marleau still be a part of this team once the smoke clears?

Then again, it might just be a “careful what you wish for” proposition.