Tag: Logan Couture


PHT Morning Skate: Preseason scratches get new jobs in Anaheim


PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

So you’re on the Anaheim Ducks’ roster and you’re not suiting up for a preseason game, what do you do? Players got behind the counter at a recent preseason game to work the concession stands at the Honda Center. (Bar Down)

There seems to be a common theme with respect to injuries in the NHL over the last 48 hours or so. Carolina Hurricanes center Jordan Staal suffered a broken bone in his leg during an odd collision on Tuesday night. Rangers forward Derek Stepan is also sidelined with a fracutured fibula. The latest comes from Nashville where team mascot Gnash has been placed on “injured reserve” with a broken leg suffered during training. (Predators website)

Teams across the hockey world are known to have various items players wear as player of the game – usually handed out by teammates following a victory. The Erie Otters of the Ontario Hockey League have gone one step further. Check out Nick Betz of the Otters modelling their player of the game outfit (via Craig Button):

Florida Panthers forward Jonathan Huberdeau is looking to put last season behind him. After winning the Calder Trophy in the lockout-shortened 2012-13 season, Huberdeau scored just nine goals and 19 assists in 69 games in 2013-14. (theScore)

San Jose Sharks forward Logan Couture is expected to resume skating Thursday after an awkward fall during the team’s preseason game in Vancouver. (San Jose Mercury News)

There have been rumours of a merger between the East Coast Hockey League and Central Hockey League. The latest comes from hockey agent Darryl Wolski. (via Twitter)

Every player who had a NHL contract during the lockout-shortened 2012-13 season will receive a bonus check on Oct. 15 as the first of three “transition payments”.  This includes players such as Chris Pronger, who last played during the 2011-12 season. (Philadelphia Daily News)

Sharks explain moving Burns back to the blueline

Los Angeles Kings v San Jose Sharks - Game Seven

The San Jose Sharks made a lot of debatable statements this offseason, but they didn’t really blow things up like some feared (and others requested). One significant move involved a tweak from within, as the organization decided to move Brent Burns back to defense.

GM Doug Wilson explained the logic to the NHL.com on Friday.

We acquired him in a trade to be a stud defenseman,” Sharks general manager Doug Wilson said. “To find a guy at that size who can shoot and skate that’s played in this League and been an All-Star as a defenseman, we don’t think there’s going to be any issue there, and especially if you’re working with [associate coach] Larry Robinson and [assistant coach] Jim Johnson.”

Maybe just as importantly, the 29-year-old appears to prefer playing on defense. The fit seems reasonable enough with Dan Boyle fleeing to the New York Rangers.

The thing is, more than a few believe that Burns simply offers more as a barreling power forward as he does as a very nice defensive piece. Fear the Fin made a strong argument against moving him (albeit back in May):

But even harder to find is the kind of unrestrained physical force Brent Burns was as a power forward for the past season and a half. He was one of the most effective forecheckers in the league, excelled on the cycle and at protecting the puck along the wall in tandem with Joe Thornton and generated a boatload of scoring opportunities every time he stepped on the ice. Oh, and he scored. A ton. That might come as news to people who only look at the counting stats (Burns scored 31 goals and 37 assists in 92 games up front) but those undersell Burns’ true offensive contributions and his real impact in transforming the Sharks from a team that couldn’t buy a goal at even-strength for two and a half years into the 5th-best even-strength offense in the league.

On the bright side, the Sharks boast a quality player, whether they roll him out on the wing or the blueline.

Logan Couture’s simple statements to NHL.com might really say it the best.

“It’s weird when you think about Brent Burns and how good of a forward he was when he moved up front,” Couture said. “Then you remember he was an NHL All-Star as a defenseman and he scored almost 20 goals as a defenseman. I’m looking forward to it. He’s always entertaining when he’s on the ice.

He’s pretty entertaining at times off the ice, too.

(H/T to The Score.)

Tomas Hertl will be very important for San Jose next season

Tomas Hertl

When Tomas Hertl showed up last season for the San Jose Sharks, he was a breath of fresh air.

His youthful exuberance and ability to score highlight-reel goals gave the already potent Sharks offense another weapon. A knee injury at the hands (read: knees) of Los Angeles Kings captain Dustin Brown cut his season short, but with 15 goals in 37 games he provided the kind of impact that helps a team feel good about the future.

The Sharks had enough confidence in Hertl’s game to buy out Martin Havlat, move Brent Burns back to defense from forward, and to not really sign anyone to replace either of them up front. While Joe Thornton, Patrick Marleau, Joe Pavelski, and Logan Couture help make up an offensively frightening top-six with the forwards, it’s Hertl who figures to be the key.

Sound crazy? Not so much.

Hertl, while he was in the lineup, spent most of his time on a line with Thornton and Burns and was a dominant possession player (only Thornton and Pavelski were better amongst forwards). Keeping the puck and scoring a bunch of goals makes him invaluable.

With Burns now back on the blue line, Sharks coach Todd McLellan could create a Corsi nightmare for opponents by assembling a top line with Hertl, Thornton, and Pavelski together. Regardless of whether that happens or not, it’s Hertl that makes things happen for Thornton the set-up man.

With the Sharks offensive options thin outside of the top-six, having Hertl recreate what he did last season is vital for balance between the top two lines. If the goals evaporate, opponents will load up against Couture and Marleau’s line. Giving other teams fits defensively is what’s made the Sharks so good in the past and having Hertl pick up where he left off will only help that out further.

Under pressure: Todd McLellan


The coach of a California-based NHL club under pressure to get his team to the promise land, its a common theme in the Golden State unless your name is Darryl Sutter of course.

San Jose’s Todd McLellan, who by the way wasn’t fired during the off-season, despite having his name be linked to a number of coaching vacancies is back behind the Sharks bench for a seventh season.

This after his team collapsed in epic fashion blowing a 3-0 series lead to the LA Kings in the first round of the 2014 Stanley Cup playoffs.

In May, Sharks’ majority owner Hasso Plattner voiced his disappointment in the team’s playoff failures in a statement. Plattner added he was confident that general manager Doug Wilson would make the appropriate changes moving forward.

Apparently keeping McLellan, who is believed to have two years remaining on his contract, around is part of that plan. His supporting staff, which includes associate coach Larry Robinson and assistants Jim Johnson and Jay Woodcroft, is still in tact as well.

McLellan has been at the helm for six seasons in the Bay Area after serving as an assistant coach on Mike Babcock’s staff in Detroit from 2005-08.

In San Jose, McLellan has guided the Sharks to six consecutive playoff appearances; however, they’ve reached the conference finals only twice.

Once getting to the final four, McLellan’s teams have won just one of eight games – that was a 4-3 win over the Vancouver Canucks in Game 3 of the 2011 Stanley Cup playoffs.

Since then, McLellan hasn’t been able to get his team past the second round despite finishing in the top 3 of the Pacific Division each year.

Following his team’s most recent collapse, a 5-1 loss in Game 7 to the Kings, McLellan called it his lowest point.

“I’m responsible for this group,” he said while at the podium at the SAP Center. “Low point since I’ve been here … that’s an easy one to answer.”

Wilson is apparently willing to go down with the sinking ship.

He re-signed Joe Thornton and Patrick Marleau to similar three-year contracts in January and tacked on no-movement clauses despite heading into a rebuild. Both have two years remaining on their deals after 2014-15  all but guaranteeing they’ll be in San Jose longer than McLellan and Wilson.

Wilson’s motto this off-season appears to be addition by subtraction.

He dealt defenseman Brad Stuart for a pair of draft picks and decided not to re-sign veteran Dan Boyle. Additionally, Wilson, who has been with the club since 2003, bought out forward Martin Havlat.

As it stands, it appears Wilson is banking on players such as sophomore Tomas Hertl and third-year NHLer Tommy Wingles, who had 16 goals in 77 games last season, to pick up the slack up front and help veterans Joe Pavelski and Logan Couture.

On the back end San Jose is hoping defenseman Mirco Mueller can make the leap and help fill out the top six.

According to CapGeek, San Jose has a little over $6 million to play with.

But without much significant help left on the free agent market, Sharks’ fans have to hope Wilson can make additions by trade or else its quite a similar looking team, which will once again try to get San Jose to that elusive Stanley Cup final.

Related: Trying to make sense of the ‘rebuild’ in San Jose

Trying to make sense of the ‘rebuild’ in San Jose

Patrick Marleau Joe Thornton

San Jose general manager Doug Wilson has always maintained that any conversations he had with Joe Thornton and Patrick Marleau would remain private. So it’s impossible to conclude, exactly, what’s been said between the club and the two veterans since the Sharks blew a 3-0 series lead versus the Kings in the first round of the 2014 playoffs.

That said, a lot of people have hazarded a guess. Because, in public, Wilson has thrown out cryptic comments like, “I want players that want to play here, not just live here,” and, “I don’t want to put a name on you, but you’re a guy that hasn’t won, had a long career, you want to go win. You might say, ‘this doesn’t fit for me.’”

Combine those remarks with the Sharks’ decision to not re-sign veteran Dan Boyle and to trade another veteran, Brad Stuart, and then consider Wilson’s stated intention to “turn the team over to the younger core, make some tough decisions, clarify our culture and the hierarchy of our team,” and you’d be excused if your conclusion was this:

Wilson wanted to trade Thornton and Marleau. Except the two players, each of whom hold a no-movement clause, refused to go.

(And you could hardly blame them for refusing to be forced out. The Sharks had only just re-signed the pair in January, giving each player a three-year contract that Wilson said at the time “fit with our team building philosophy.” Translation: they could’ve received more on the open market, but they really wanted to stay in San Jose, so they took a hometown discount.)

In July, Wilson was left to try and clarify the “rebuild.” Or maybe a better word for it was backtracking?

“I can understand when people say there are different types of rebuild,” he told the Mercury News. “We’re not going to finish last to try and draft people first or second. This is not something this franchise can do, because we already have some good players in key positions. You’re not going to see us with 50 points next year — we’re too good a team for that.”

Instead, Wilson said the Sharks intended to rebuild their culture and become a more tightly knit group — a plan that includes giving more leadership responsibilities to young players like Joe Pavelski, Logan Couture, Marc-Edouard Vlasic and Justin Braun.

Where does that leave Thornton and Marleau? Hard to say. But it would be a surprise if Thornton were still wearing a ‘C’ and Marleau an ‘A’ come the start of the season.

Could that make for an awkward dynamic in the dressing room? Yep, it could. And that could be a distraction.

On the other hand, it could also turn out for the best. There are many who believe Wilson overreacted to the loss, devastating as it was, to the Kings, who went on to win their second Stanley Cup in three years. After all, the Boston Bruins blew a 3-0 series lead in 2010 and came back to win it all in 2011.

Granted, the Bruins didn’t have the history of postseason disappointments that the Sharks have. But San Jose was a very good team in the 2013-14 regular season. Its reward for finishing with 111 points? A match-up with Los Angeles. Which was a bit unlucky.

At any rate, San Jose is going to be a very interesting team to watch next season. And assuming the Sharks make the playoffs, which they should, an even more interesting team to watch then.