Tag: locker room issues

Toronto Maple Leafs v Los Angeles Kings

NHL to fine Maple Leafs for Ron Wilson’s locker room “bounty” against San Jose


We’re not often privy to what goes on inside an NHL locker room. HBO’s 24/7 was a distinct change in that manner of doing business, but the Toronto Maple Leafs are learning a bit of a hard (and stupid) lesson about letting internal matters get published in the local papers.

When the Leafs beat the San Jose Sharks the other night, Leafs coach Ron Wilson was shown on camera breaking out a wad of cash, $600 worth, walking back to the Leafs locker room with Francois Beauchemin. That cash was destined to land in the wallet of Carl Gunnarsson who score the game-winning goal. $600 seems like a funny number to pick out, but in this case it was appropriate as the victory was Ron Wilson’s 600th in his career.

Why was Wilson making it rain during post game? It’s simple, the Sharks are the team Wilson used to coach before coming to Toronto and as is somewhat typical in games involving a player’s (or coach in this case) old team, getting the game winner nets you a bit of cash internally.

That locker room gamesmanship doesn’t usually get talked about in the papers or discussed in public and today, we’re discovering why that is because the NHL frowns upon seeing cash being bandied about after a game and will reportedly fine the Maple Leafs for the coach’s “bounty” for victory. Eric Duhatschek of the Globe & Mail discusses the league going a bit over the top in keeping up appearances.

The problem that I foresee is that the league has – to its everlasting peril – now decided to draw a line in the sand for an act that has been commonplace for years. Coaches do it occasionally, but 90 per cent of the time, it’s a player that puts the money up – say, when Dany Heatley goes back to play Ottawa for the first time, he would post an incentive for whichever new teammate helps them win against his old team. And while a player offering up dollars from his own pocket might not be a CBA or a salary-cap violation, surely it must contravene some internal gambling regulation within the league – and run afoul of NHL policy as well.

It’s a slippery slope indeed with the NHL cracking down on these silly side bet shenanigans. After all, Wilson offering up virtual pocket change for a professional athlete in netting the game-winner doesn’t compare to the bounty accusations we’ve seen in other sports.

In the early 1990s, then Philadelphia Eagles coach Buddy Ryan faced criticism when he supposedly offered up a bounty to anyone on his defense who injured Cowboys quarterback Troy Aikman during an upcoming game. At least with Wilson, there’s no actual harm being committed here. It’s not as if he turned into a modern-day Reggie Dunlop offering money to put Dany Heatley or Joe Thornton in the hospital.

These sorts of things go on in locker rooms all the time amongst players but when you’re a team that plays in a hockey-crazed city like Toronto every move, no matter how big it is, gets noticed and discussed and over-analyzed. In this case, seeing raw cash changing hands on camera raises more than a few eyebrows and the NHL is just looking to keep up appearances.  At the same time, I’d hope the league is smart enough to just let boys be boys when it comes to breaking up the monotony of a long season.

Mike Keenan says ‘Neon’ Dion Phaneuf caused some locker room issues, but praised his overall play

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If anyone knows “difficult” people, it’s former NHL coach “Iron” Mike Keenan. After all, he sees one every time he looks in the mirror.

The fiery coach – known for brow beating a considerable amount of players, though it’s unclear that he always left as good an impression as he did on Jeremy Roenick with his rants – was last fired from the Calgary Flames after the 2008-09 season. During his last two seasons behind an NHL bench, he surely had the opportunity to get to know then-face of the Flames franchise, Dion Phaneuf.

TSN’s Darren Dreger spoke with Keenan about the Flames-turned-Maple Leafs defenseman, who will return to Calgary as the Toronto captain tonight.

Keenan admitted that Phaneuf’s “overly confident, if not cocky” behavior rubbed some Flames veterans the wrong way. If you need any evidence of that feeling, just look at the nickname he gave him: “Neon Dion.” Yup, when people compare you to a former NFL cornerback whose theatrics and rampant egotism overshadowed his elite coverage skills, it’s probably a sign that the target of such comparisons has a substantial ego.

There were arguments, and some wanted Keenan to tighten the reigns and discipline Phaneuf, but the former coach enjoyed Phaneuf’s sometimes, combative nature and verbal approach and was willing to live with his mistakes as he developed.

Keenan compliments the 25 year old defenceman for always showing drive and arriving at the rink everyday, fired up, and ready to play.

At times there was friction in Calgary’s dressing room, and perhaps a sense of jealousy over the 6 year, $39 million dollar extension Phaneuf signed with the Flames in 2008.

However, Keenan says he very much enjoyed coaching Phaneuf and says he would have him on any team he’s associated with in the future; adding former NHL stars such as Jeremy Roenick, Chris Chelios, or Ed Belfour, all had their issues, but all were thoroughbreds Keenan found very coachable.

Now, it’s tough to argue with one sentiment floating around Twitter and other sections of the hockey world: perhaps Keenan is just trying to get his name back out there after watching the last two seasons from afar?

That being said, it’s not that tough to believe that Phaneuf’s sense of self worth might have inflated along with his notoriety and wealth. There were some thoughts that his combination of brutal hits and a scorching slap shot might allow him to become the next Chris Pronger, but defensive lapses and other shortcomings have transformed his contract into one of the league’s worst deals.

So far, it seems like “Neon Dion” is burning out like an old neon light. Unfortunately, that just means his playing career parallels Keenan’s coaching days.