Tag: lists

San Jose Sharks v Phoenix Coyotes

PHT presents: Great moments in “interference”


“Breaking the fourth wall” is a term in entertainment, but Ryane Clowe’s bizarre puck-touching incident plays like sports’ answer to such a break from the script. Whether it’s a coach, player or even fan, sometimes people “intervene” in events in a way that makes us gasp. Here are some of PHT’s choices for the most famous – and infamous – examples of such moments in sports.

Steve Bartman

How could the notorious Chicago Cubs fan-turned-scapegoat not make such a list? If you have even a vague interest in sports, you know the story. The Cubs were in Game 6 of the NLCS against the Florida Marlins when Bartman reflexively reached for a ball, Moises Alou lost his mind and then Bartman was blamed for the loss, the sagging US economy and Michael Jordan’s time with the Washington Wizards.* You know things are bad when ESPN makes a documentary about your shattered life:

One could say that Bartman is the bizarro Jeffrey Maier, even.

* – Just guessing.

Sal Alosi

From the “far more injurious” department, we have Sal Alosi, former strength and conditioning coach for the New York Jets. On Dec. 13, 2010, he tripped Miami Dolphins player Nolan Carroll and, well, you just have to see it to believe it:

Woody Hayes

Woody Hayes was a legendary college football with a legendarily short fuse. That temper truly boiled over during the 1978 Gator Bowl when he punched Clemson player Charlie Bauman in the throat as head coach at Ohio State.

Bobby Knight, Jim Playfair and other coaches throwing things

OK, this is a slight cheat as most of Bobby Knight’s epic meltdowns seemed to come after or before the whistles so to speak, but are you really going to complain about watching all of these great moments of object-throwing anger? Robbie Ftorek shows up in the video below while Jim Playfair might win the hockey division altogether.

Lenny Randle blows foul ball, A-Rod’s “slap”

Perhaps it’s the 162-game schedule that makes baseball so dominant in the break-from-script storylines. Jesse Spector pointed out two faux paus moments:

First, Lenny Randle attempted to “blow” a fair ball into foul territory (which Jerry Hairston also apparently attempted) in a moment that belonged in “Major League.”

The second example was less slapstick and more mean slap: you may remember Alex “A-Rod” Rodriguez slapping a baseball away from Bronson Arroyo during “The Bloody Sock Game.”

Jeff Van Gundy holds on for dear life

The New York Knicks-Miami Heat feud might have been the closest basketball ever came to hockey and the quality of play was about on “Dead Puck Era” levels. (Translation: not good.) On the bright side, all the ugliness had at least a moment of comic relief when Jeff Van Gundy tried to stand up to Alonzo Mourning (who was fighting Larry Johnson) and instead went on the ride of his life.

(H/T to Ben Carroll)

Clowe’s place

So where does Ryane Clowe’s odd interference weigh in? It came during a big moment, yet not in a huge one like many of those events, which frequently happened during the postseason. Still, if you want to judge for yourself, read up on the reactions here and take another look at the video below:


Anyway, those are some of the greatest break-the-fourth-wall moments that come to mind. The beauty of a comments section is to fill in the blanks with “How didn’t we think of that?” type entries, so fire away with some of your favorite omissions.

Bloomberg Businessweek claims NHL has “identity crisis”

Florida Panthers v Chicago Blackhawks

With a measly three NHL players listed in its “Power 100” rankings, Bloomberg Businessweek’s Brian Finkel claims that the league is going through “an identity crisis.”

The NHL’s representation in the Power 100 is so low that it trails every other sport except action sports and boxing. By comparison, the National Football League has 26 players on the list, followed by the National Basketball Association, with 20, and Major League Baseball, with 16.

The cold reality is that hockey has an identity crisis. Unlike its Big Four counterparts, the NHL lacks a core group of marketable superstars. Of the 39 athletes who made a repeat appearance on each of the last three Power 100s, not one plays hockey.

In case you’re wondering which three made it, here they are: Jonathan Toews (No. 69), Daniel Sedin (76) and Tim Thomas (86).

Finkel explains that should-be stars slipped off the list for a variety of reasons. Sidney Crosby’s concussion issues, Patrick Kane’s occasionally scandalous moments and Alex Ovechkin’s on-ice struggles justify their omissions, as far as Finkel & Co. are concerned.

Of course, despite that doom and gloom, Finkel cannot deny the growth of the sport as a whole.

Having marquee talent is great, but the NHL might boast something even better: a product that simply sells itself.

Ulf Samuelsson’s son makes list of U.S.-born players primed for 2012 NHL Draft

NHL Draft Hockey

It’s likely that plenty of hockey fans cringe whenever they hear the name Ulf Samuelsson. For many, the former NHL defenseman will be remembered for his over-the-line hits (most notably his notorious knee-to-knee on Cam Neely) more than winning two Stanley Cups with the Pittsburgh Penguins or anything else he accomplished during in his 16-year career.

Hockey fans might want to get used to the name Samuelsson, though, as it seems like his progeny have a solid future in the NHL. The Penguins took Ulf’s son – and fellow blueliner – Philip (with Ulf in this post’s main image) in the second round of the 2009 NHL Entry Draft and USA Today’s Kevin Allen listed right winger Henrik as the fifth best U.S.-born player eligible for the 2012 draft today.

Henrik scored 11 points and tallied (an Ulf-inspired?) 74 penalty minutes in 27 games with the USHL. While his dad will coach the top Modo team next season, Allen reports that Henrik will play for Modo Jr.

One other interesting name on that list is Allen’s top ranked American-born player Alex Galchenyuk. The center plays alongside probable top overall pick Nail Yakupov for the Sarnia Sting and his more well-rounded style spurs some to wonder if he might actually end up being a better fit for the NHL than the dazzling Russian winger.

Three defensemen round out the 2-4 spots on Allen’s list: James Trouba, Nick Ebert (whose last name seems like a natural fit for awful “two thumbs up/down” type jokes) and Jordan Schmaltz. From everything I’ve heard, the 2012 draft features a deep and talented group of players, so there’s no guarantee that being a top American prospect will mean that all five of these players will become first round picks.

Still, those of you who are more interested in prospects might want to keep an eye out for those five players. Opposing players would probably be wise to keep an eye out for Henrik Samuelsson in particular, at least if that on-ice nastiness runs in the family.

2011 restricted free agency: Players who still need a new deal

Tampa Bay Lightning v Los Angeles Kings

Not a lot has changed in the unrestricted free agent market since Joe took a look at who’s left earlier this week. With the possibility for offer sheets and salary arbitration muddling things a bit in restricted free agency, however, it seems like a good time to give a couple updates.

First, here is a fresh update of the players who are still staring at a possible salary arbitration hearing between July 20-August 4.

July 20: Lauri Korpikoski (Phoenix), Teddy Purcell (Tampa Bay)

July 21: Andrew Cogliano (Edmonton), Brad Richardson (Los Angeles), Brandon Dubinsky (New York Rangers)

July 25: Andrej Sekera (Buffalo), Brian Boyle (New York Rangers)

July 28: Josh Gorges (Montreal), Ryan Callahan (New York Rangers)

July 29: Jannik Hansen (Vancouver)

Aug. 2: Shea Weber (Nashville)

Aug. 3: Chris Campoli (Chicago), Blake Wheeler (Winnipeg), Zach Parise (New Jersey)

Aug. 4: Mark Fraser (New Jersey), Dan Sexton (Anaheim), Blake Comeau (New York Islanders)

Players such as Ryan Wilson (July 22), Kevin Porter (July 26) and Alec Martinez (July 27) removed their respective days from the arbitration calendar, making for an inconsistently busy schedule on certain days. August 2 and 3 will probably be the most important two day stretch with Weber and Parise’s cases scheduled (though their teams have a nice amount of time to come to a compromise with them on a deal, which Parise stated would be a goal of his).

Now that we covered the players who might be headed for arbitration, here’s a list of some of the remaining players who are restricted free agents but aren’t going in that direction. These are players who could conceivably receive offer sheets from other teams, too.

15 notable RFA forwards (with 2010-11 cap hits)

Steven Stamkos TBL 21 $3,725,000
Kyle Turris PHO 21 $2,695,833
Steve Bernier FLA 26 $2,000,000
Mikkel Boedker PHO 21 $1,725,000
Josh Bailey NYI 21 $1,725,000
Michael Frolik CHI 23 $1,275,000
Brandon Sutter CAR 22 $1,225,000
Viktor Tikhonov PHO 23 $1,175,000
Bobby Butler OTT 24 $900,000
Oscar Moller LAK 22 $875,000
T.J. Galiardi COL 23 $875,000
Ryan White MTL 23 $850,000
Vladimir Zharkov NJD 23 $850,000
Brad Marchand BOS 23 $821,667
Victor Oreskovich VAN 24 $575,000

Some notable players who became unrestricted free agents after they didn’t receive qualifying offer: Patrick O’Sullivan and Robbie Schremp.

7 notable RFA defensemen

Drew Doughty LAK 21 $3,475,000
Zach Bogosian WIN 20 $3,375,000
Luke Schenn TOR 21 $2,975,000
Karl Alzner WAS 22 $1,675,000
Ty Wishart NYI 23 $1,121,667
Kyle Cumiskey COL 24 $600,000
Marc-Andre Gragnani BUF 24 $500,000

Some notable defensemen who weren’t given qualifying offers: Matt Smaby, Anton Stralman and Jack Hillen.

4 notable RFA goalies (OK, so Enroth is far and away the most notable, but still … )

Jhonas Enroth BUF 23 $866,667
Chad Johnson NYR 25 $850,000
Riku Helenius TBL 23 $821,667
Tyler Plante FLA 24 $687,500

The Hockey News lists its top 10 all-time rookie playoff performances

Ville Leino, Tuukka Rask

No doubt about it, Tyler Seguin made a huge impact in his first two career playoff appearances. Some even think that he’s been good enough to make Boston Bruins head coach Claude Julien look bad (even if his team managed to make the Eastern Conference finals without Seguin).

In the rush to crown Seguin the next big thing, it’s important to note that two games remain a small sample. Sure, his six-point start ties him for second place in NHL history for a player’s first two contests, but he has a way to go before he can join the ranks of the all-time best rookie playoff performers.

In a tribute to that sentiment (and also Seguin’s big night), Adam Proteau constructed his top 10 list of all-time rookie playoff performances for The Hockey News. The list includes memorable runs from Ken Dryden, Jeremy Roenick and even current Phoenix Coyotes GM Don Maloney.

First, here are the two active players who made the list:

9. Cam Ward, Hurricanes

Just 22 years old at the time, Ward tasted his first playoff action in 2006 when he replaced Canes starter Martin Gerber in Game 2 of the first round against the Canadiens. Ward never surrendered the role the rest of the way, winning 15 games (including two Game 7s) and claiming the Conn Smythe Trophy as Carolina won its first Stanley Cup.


5. Ville Leino, Flyers

Though Leino played seven playoff games with Detroit in 2009, he was also still considered a rookie in his second playoff season. Leino was a relatively old 26 when he suited up for Philadelphia in 2010, but made the most of it, setting a new league record for playoff rookie assists (14) and tying Ciccarelli’s record for rookie playoff points (21) set in 1981.

Some might have actually ranked Ward higher than Leino because he was arguably even more valuable to his team as he won the Conn Smythe and a Stanley Cup in 2006, but it’s tough to argue with Leino’s overall numbers.

Quite possibly the greatest goalie in NHL history and two scrappy overachievers round out the top three of Proteau’s list.

3. Claude Lemieux, Canadiens

One of the more underrated playoff performers in NHL history, Lemieux first showed his post-season chops as a 20-year-old in 1986, scoring 10 goals (including four game-winners) in 20 games and helping the Habs to another Cup.

2. Dino Ciccarelli, North Stars

A member of the most recent Hockey Hall of Fame class, the right winger was 21 and had only played 32 regular season games when the 1981 playoffs began. He then set a rookie record for post-season goals (14) and points (21) in 19 games for a North Stars team that lost the Cup final in five games to the Islanders.

1. Patrick Roy, Canadiens

The Canadiens legend was just 20 years old in 1986 when he powered the Habs to the Stanley Cup and won the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP thanks to 15 wins and a 1.93 goals-against average.

People often point the advantage of experience in the postseason, but those 10 players rank among the players who were quick learners. Will Seguin force his way onto later top 10 lists like this in the future? He’ll need to keep his hot streak going to have a chance.