Tag: Lightning-Penguins

Tampa Bay Lightning v Pittsburgh Penguins - Game Seven

Dwayne Roloson steals spotlight, shuts out Penguins in Game 7

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Going into this series, the story was that the Tampa Bay Lightning held a big advantage in the “star players” category, so Marc-Andre Fleury would need to save the day for the Pittsburgh Penguins. As it turns out, the hockey world should have focused on the other goalie in this series: Dwayne Roloson.

Roloson ended up being one of – if not the – biggest difference makers in Tampa Bay’s comeback from a 3-1 series deficit, underscoring his perfect record in elimination games with a 36-save shutout. (Roloson is now 6-0 in elimination games.)

Tampa Bay 1, Pittsburgh 0; Lightning win series 4-3

This year’s first round seemed to favor road teams, but that trend ended in Game 7s. The Lightning were actually the only away team to win in Game 7, as the Flyers, Canucks and Bruins all took care of business in their buildings when it mattered the most.

In a way, they also beat the Penguins at their own game. The Lightning beat the Penguins by scores of 4-2, 8-2 and 5-0 in their other wins while two of Pittsburgh’s three wins came by one goal. The thing is, anyone who followed the Lightning know that the team has been committed to defense, at least schematically. Just ask Patrick Roy about the defensive-minded tendencies of Tampa Bay coach Guy Boucher.

The game’s only goal might be one of the weirdest of the playoffs because Sean Bergenheim scored nearly the same exact way in Game 6. Compare the two goals for yourself.

Bergenheim’s Game 7 goal:

Bergenheim’s Game 6 goal:

Weird, huh?

Ultimately, the Penguins couldn’t overcome Roloson’s outstanding goaltending, Tampa Bay’s superior offensive talent and the Lightning’s passable overall defense.

The outlook for both teams

The Lightning should feel great about themselves, although they face a much more balanced team in the top-ranked Washington Capitals. Obviously, these two teams know each other well after facing each other six times and battling it out for the Southeast Division title. Washington will be well rested and holds home ice advantage, but Tampa Bay should be much looser since the Caps will be under far greater pressure to succeed. Washington won’t see a huge advantage in star power, either, especially with Martin St. Louis remaining perhaps the league’s least-discussed superstar (four goals and four assists for eight points against Pittsburgh). Something tells me that if Steven Stamkos is even close to healthy, he’ll gladly try to one-up Alex Ovechkin.

That series will also feature an interesting goalie duel between 41-year-old Roloson and Michal Neuvirth/whichever early 20’s goalie the Capitals trot out.

Meanwhile, the Penguins must cope with mixed feelings. On the negative side, they failed to make it past the first round for the first time since the Ottawa Senators clobbered them in 2007. It hurts that much more because they used their guile to build a 3-1 series lead against Tampa Bay. Obviously, Pittsburgh will look back on their 1-for-35 mess of a power play and wonder “What if?”

I don’t think I’m alone in giving Pittsburgh a partial pass, to some extent, though. The team stayed relevant during the second half of the 2010-11 season because of hard work (and a decent sampling of charity points, by the way) but clearly missed the firepower of Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin.

If Crosby and Malkin can eventually be healthy during the 2011-12 season, they’ll join a team that is among the NHL’s leaders in elbow grease. Once the pain of coughing up that series lead subsides, Penguins fans can daydream about Crosby/Malkin setting up James Neal for one-timers next season.

Those visions might look a lot like the feeds St. Louis sends to Stamkos, actually.

Tampa Bay holds huge special teams advantage over Pittsburgh through 6 games

Pittsburgh Penguins v Tampa Bay Lightning - Game Six

There’s a lot of uncertainty in hockey. It’s a sport that can make the most sober diagnoses seem downright silly.

So every once in a while, it’s nice to know you’re not crazy. When I picked the Tampa Bay Lightning to beat the Pittsburgh Penguins (incorrectly in six games, by the way), the team’s highly productive power play was the justification. The Bolts scored 69 goals on the man advantage in 2010-11, second only to the Vancouver Canucks’ 72.*

* The Lightning wouldn’t rank highly on my power play plus/minus scale, though, since they allowed the most shorthanded goals in the league (16).

I wasn’t the only who noticed this distinction, but I’d wager that even the point’s loudest proponents didn’t expect such a stark contrast. Here’s a quick breakdown of the two teams’ power play efficiency through six games.

Tampa Bay’s power play

Overall: 8-for-25 (32 percent)

Shorthanded goals allowed: 0

Game 1: 0 for 1; Game 2: 2 for 6; Game 3: 2 for 4; Game 4: 0 for 4; Game 5: 4 for 7; Game 6: 0 for 3

A few thoughts: So they’ve scored power play goals in three of six games, but Game 5 was the real eyebrow-raiser. Four goals on the PP alone is pretty ridiculous.

Pittsburgh’s power play

Overall: 1-for-30 (3.3 percent)

Shorthanded goals allowed: 1, by Mattias Ohlund in Game 2.

Game 1: 0 for 6; Game 2: 0 for 7; Game 3: 0 for 2; Game 4: 1 for 3; Game 5: 0 for 7; Game 6: 0 for 5

A few thoughts: So the Penguins scored one measly PP goal, but it was in some ways neutralized by that Ohlund goal (in the big picture, since the goals happened in different games). The startling part is that they’ve received 30 opportunities, second only to the Philadelphia Flyers’ 31. Only the Boston Bruins have less PP goals (0, but just in 15 opportunities) and the defunct New York Rangers are the only other team with just 1 PP goal (although they had 20 opportunities instead of 30).

So, long story short, the Penguins have the worst power play in the 2011 playoffs. This clip of Chris Conner flubbing a penalty shot might be the perfect summary of their special teams struggles.

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In fact, you have to go back to the 2010 Washington Capitals – you know, the team that lost in the first round to the Montreal Canadiens – to find a power play that was less effective. The Caps only converted on 1 out of 33 opportunities in that series.


Much like the 2010 Capitals, it’s amazing the Penguins have gotten this far with such a terrible power play. Sure, those numbers probably indicate a lack of offensive creativity (not a shocker in the absence of Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin), but it also highlights just how scrappy this bunch can be. They’ve won three games thanks to good defense, solid goaltending and a few bounces here and there.

Can they win Game 7 that way? Will they fall victim to Tampa Bay’s superior special teams once more? Or will they flip the script in the final game? It should be interesting to find out on Wednesday.

Steve Downie scores three points in 4-2 Lightning win, Tampa Bay forces Game 7

Sean Bergenheim, Steve Downie

Make no mistake about it, this is a great time to be a hockey fan. There will be two Game 7 showdowns on Tuesday and thanks to the Tampa Bay Lightning’s 4-2 win over the Pittsburgh Penguins, there will be at least one more on Wednesday.

The Lightning won thanks to Steve Downie’s one-goal, two assist night and a 27-save Dwayne Roloson performance, setting up a decisive Game 7.

Tampa Bay 4, Pittsburgh 2; Series tied 3-3.

Pascal Dupuis began the scoring about eight minutes into the first period, but Teddy Purcell banged a rebound home to send the first period to a 1-1 tie. Sean Bergenheim scored the only tally of the second period, sending Tampa Bay into the third with a 2-1 lead. Jordan Staal scored his first goal of the playoffs with a great shot to tie things up 2-2, but that’s when the game turned on its head.

Roloson made an enormous, highlight-reel save right after allowing that tying goal and then Downie answered Staal’s goal with the game-winner a bit more than a minute later. He barely slipped the puck under Marc-Andre Fleury to collect a rebound goal.

Ryan Malone made his fair share of mistakes, including taking a third period penalty, but he ended up putting the exclamation point on Tampa Bay’s win by scoring with a slap shot on a partial breakaway. Malone told Versus that he just “closed his eyes” and hoped it would go in. He ended up with a goal and a primary assist in the game.

Two experienced goalies in different spots

While Fleury didn’t give up a bunch of goals like he did in Pittsburgh’s two other losses, there still might be some question about his mindset after this game. Fleury allowed four goals on just 21 shots. Of course, “The Flower” received plenty of criticism at times during the Penguins’ 2009 playoff run, yet most people just remember his Cup-clinching save against Nicklas Lidstrom in Game 7 of the finals.

Tampa Bay probably doesn’t share the same worries with their hot-and-cold goalie. Roloson stopped 27 of the 29 shots he faced, pushing his record in elimination games to a startling 5-0. (Beyond being a solid goalie, Roloson did this without ever winning a Stanley Cup because he was injured in the first game of the Edmonton Oilers’ Cup finals series against the Carolina Hurricanes and was demoted in a goalie rotation during his days with the Minnesota Wild.)

Looking ahead

While Tampa Bay’s comeback after being down 3-1 isn’t quite on par with the Chicago Blackhawks’ turnaround, it’s still an impressive feat. Of course, it won’t mean much if they cannot complete the task, as they must beat the playoff-proven Penguins in Pittsburgh on Game 7.

Naturally, we’ll break that game down before and after it takes place on Wednesday. Stay tuned.