Tag: Kurt Overhardt

Brandon Dubinsky

Blue Jackets’ Dubinsky had equipment held hostage


Columbus Blue Jackets center Brandon Dubinsky has been where Ryan Johansen is.

As a restricted free agent, Dubinksy, who shares the same agent as Johansen (Kurt Overhardt), was a holdout from New York Rangers camp in the summer of 2009.

The 28-year-old remembers things between the two sides getting so bad that he didn’t have access to his own equipment.

“(Rangers general manager) Glen Sather actually held my equipment hostage from me,” Dubinsky told the Columbus Dispatch. “I’m not sure I should tell you guys that. But I was using rental skates. I was just skating laps, just burning my legs out every day to try to keep my legs in shape.”

After missing eight days of camp, Dubinsky eventually signed a two-year $3.7 million deal.

“Mine was a different situation, but I’m not proud of it,” said Dubinsky. “I’m not going to comment on whether I agree or disagree with what (Johansen) is doing. All I’ll say is, he’s an individual that has got to look out for his interests and his family’s interests. He’s got to make his own decisions.”

Johansen has reportedly turned down offers of $6 million over two years, $32 million over six and $46 million over eigh years.

The Blue Jackets center has gone home to Vancouver while he awaits a new deal.

Blue Jackets negotiations with Johansen are ‘not even close’

Ryan Johansen

The Columbus Blue Jackets may have a problem on their hands.

Aaron Portzline of The Columbus Dispatch reports negotiations between the Jackets and soon-to-be restricted free agent and budding superstar Ryan Johansen are not going well. Johansen’s agent, Kurt Overhardt, gives the grim update.

“We’re not even close,” Johansen told The Dispatch. “They say ‘We want to sign you to a ‘bridge’ deal.’ We say ‘We don’t want to do a ‘bridge,’ and that’s the end of it.”

Yikes. To make things even more uncomfortable for the Jackets, 21-year-old Johansen said he feels he’s earned more than a bridge deal of two or three seasons and that the process feels “disrespectful.”

“I want to play in Columbus, and I want to be a Blue Jacket, but I want to get this done,” Johansen said. “It seems like a slap in the face.”

Johansen had a breakout year this past season as he scored 33 goals and had 63 points to lead the team in scoring.

Jackets GM Jarmo Kekalainen has been very good in his dealings with players to this point in his tenure there, but it’s clear there’s a difference of opinion. Bridge contracts are all the rage with teams because they want to not pay out big bucks to guys that young.

The problem is when things like this happen and a player wants a long-term deal and ideally the big money that goes along with it. Perhaps the guy to look up to in this situation for Johansen is Montreal’s P.K. Subban. He too wanted to avoid a bridge deal and now he’s made it much more costly for the Habs to re-sign him this summer.

LeBrun: Kyle Turris officially wants to be traded

Kyle Turris
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Apparently Kyle Turris and his agent Kurt Overhardt were getting tired of hearing the speculation and rumors about what’s going on with their lack of negotiations with the Coyotes. ESPN’s Pierre LeBrun hears from Overhardt that his client does indeed want to be traded out of Phoenix.

While that revelation may not be that big of a surprise given the contention between both sides in their talks, the most curious part of what Overhardt shared with LeBrun was that their talks were never about money.  Instead, Overhardt says it’s been about allowing Turris to be able to move forward in his career in Phoenix.

In his time in Phoenix over parts of three seasons, Turris has averaged just over 12 minutes per game in ice time. It’s tough to move your career ahead when you don’t play. You also have to earn the ice time as well and that’s a struggle he’s had under Dave Tippett in Phoenix.

Coyotes GM Don Maloney has been adamant that he will not trade Turris and that if he doesn’t like it, he can sit and pout about it, mostly because he has no choice in the matter. Turris is a restricted free agent and under Coyotes control no matter what. Unless a team tried to sign Turris to an offer sheet, the Coyotes don’t have to make a move at all. Turris, meanwhile, has until December 1 to get signed or else he sits out for the year.

What was an ugly situation already just got escalated into a game of chicken. The catch here being that Turris and Overhardt are playing it against a tree and not another car. Unless Maloney is thoroughly blown away by a trade offer, it’s hard to see him budging on this situation.

So Kyle Turris wants out of Phoenix after all

Kyle Turris

How good are Kyle Turris’ contract negotiations going in Phoenix? They’re going so well that according to CBC’s Elliotte Friedman Turris now wants out of town (see item 9).

After seeing crazy demands out of Turris’ camp as the restricted free agent looks to play this year, his frustration at not getting a deal squared away with Coyotes GM Don Maloney, Turris would like to take his talents elsewhere away from coach Dave Tippett. The problems here for Turris is that he’s under Coyotes control no matter what, doesn’t have the scoring numbers to back up his demands, and has a December 1 deadline to sign a contract or sit out the whole season.

Time is ticking away in that respect and the Coyotes don’t need to do anything for him because he’s their player and unless a massive offer sheet comes Turris’ way, the Coyotes would likely match any deal. Talk about having no leverage. Turris’ agent Kurt Overhardt has been quiet about his client is actually looking for from the Coyotes.

As for who might want Turris, line up any team in need of a young, talented center. Calgary (desperate for help outside of Jokinen), Anaheim (Saku Koivu is on the old side), Toronto (Grabovski the lone guy to be counted on), and Edmonton (if they’re done with Sam Gagner) stand out above all. With Turris’ RFA status and the Coyotes not looking to deal him, however, he could be out of luck and get to sit home all season long. Here’s to hoping Turris bought a nice recliner to sit at home with, he’ll need it.

Kyle Turris either wants a ton of money or to drive Coyotes GM Don Maloney crazy

Kyle Turris

Phoenix Coyotes restricted free agent Kyle Turris would normally be just over a week away from preparing to join the team in training camp. Instead, he’s sitting things out waiting to get a new contract worked out with the team and after a few frustrating seasons with Phoenix, negotiations might be going a bit difficult for both sides.

Turris was the Coyotes first round pick in 2007 and since then he’s participated with the team three out of the last four years totaling up 131 games played and just 46 points (19 goals, 27 assists). The last two seasons he’s played in 63 games in 2008-2009 and 65 games in 2010-2011 respectively while still alternating between the NHL and the AHL as well as the NHL and the press box as a healthy scratch. Turris spent all of 2009-2010 in the AHL.

With those kinds of numbers in mind, Turris’ negotiations with the Coyotes apparently aren’t going too hot and James van Riemsdyk’s new contract might be to blame for that. ESPN’s Scott Burnside reports on what he’s heard Turris is asking for and if you’re Coyotes GM Don Maloney you’d probably be exasperated by the numbers.

Still, league sources told ESPN.com that Turris is looking for a three-year deal worth an average of slightly more than $4 million annually or a two-year deal worth slightly more than $3 million. Those numbers would put Turris in the same high-rent district as James van Riemsdyk, who recently signed a six-year extension with the Philadelphia Flyers worth an average of $4.25 million. Van Riemsdyk is another player from that talent-rich 2007 draft class; he was the second overall pick behind No. 1 selection Patrick Kane of the Chicago Blackhawks.

With van Riemsdyk’s monster extension worth six years and $25.5 million, Turris feels that he’s in the same neighborhood talent-wise as the Flyers budding star. The problem here is that Turris didn’t get to show off in the playoffs the way van Riemsdyk was able to. It was in the Eastern Conference playoffs where van Riemsdyk turned up his game and played like a dominating big forward taking plenty of shots and driving the net to create scoring chances. It was a revelation to see van Riemsdyk break out like that, but for Turris, being able to impress Coyotes coach Dave Tippett has been tough to do.

In Turris’ last two NHL seasons, he’s averaged time on ice that’s more befitting of a fourth liner than a first round draft pick. In 2008-2009 he averaged 12:55 played per game and this past season that number dropped to 11:16 per game. For a guy who’s meant to be an offensive threat and a playmaker, playing that little per night is not going to get it done, especially playing on the fourth line. Turris was able to score 11 goals with 14 assists last season but spent the latter half of the year in the press box.

In the playoffs, however, Turris did play in all four games the Coyotes had and scored a goal with two assists while averaging 13:05 played per game in a series that saw them swept out by the Red Wings. It’s not the kind of epiphany postseason that van Riemsdyk saw, and for Turris that’s what’s going to work against him if he thinks he can get that kind of deal from the Coyotes. The Coyotes still operating without an owner doesn’t help matters much either.

You have to wonder if such an exorbitant asking price considering his output is either based on what he might eventually do if given more playing time or if it’s Turris and agent Kurt Overhardt’s not-so subtle way of telling the Coyotes they’d like to get more playing time come hell or high water. With a presumed large gap between the demands and what the Coyotes are offering, it could set the stage for an eventual trade. It’s all part of the hard bargaining process, of course, and we’re getting a little peek as to how things go but you have to believe things are a bit more difficult between both teams than we’ve known all along.