Tag: Ken Dryden

Jonathan Quick

PHT Morning Skate: Everyone is loving Jonathan Quick

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PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

Bob McKenzie pumps Jonathan Quick’s tires after his stellar Game 1 performance. (TSN)

The Blues, meanwhile, aren’t exactly glowing about the NHL’s official explanation as to why Dwight King wasn’t given a major penalty for boarding Alex Pietrangelo. (Post-Dispatch)

Not-so stunning headline: The Capitals’ four best players need to play better if they’re going to beat the Rangers. (CSNWashington.com)

Braden Holtby says he had a hard time getting into the game thanks to a lack of shots faced. Goalies: Can’t live with ’em… (Capitals Insider)

Patrik Elias and Zach Parise are marveling at what Jaromir Jagr is doing at nearly 40-years-old. (Star-Ledger)

Legendary goalie Ken Dryden opines on how body checking has changed over the years, and not for the better. (Globe And Mail)

The Florida Panthers vow they’ll return to the playoffs next year and go deeper, too. (Sun-Sentinel)

Erik Erlendsson talks about how the Lightning need a long-term answer in goal. (Tampa Tribune)

Passing Dryden: Vokoun steals spotlight on Ovechkin’s return with shutout

Tomas Vokoun, Karl Alzner, Dennis Wideman
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It was Alex Ovechkin’s first game back after his three-game suspension, but it turned into the Tomas Vokoun show instead.

Vokoun had 30 saves in earning his third shutout of the season and 47th in his career while Alex Semin had a penalty shot goal and an assist to lead the way to a sleepy 3-0 win over a spiraling downward Montreal team. The shutout pushes Vokoun past Ken Dryden for 26th on the all-time shutout list.

Vokoun headed into this weekend’s action wondering when exactly he’d be playing even though he was open to playing more. Coach Dale Hunter has been working both Vokoun and Michal Neuvirth in and out of goal lately. After seeing Vokoun turn aside all Canadiens shots today, however, Hunter will have a curious decision on who to start tomorrow afternoon against Boston.

It would normally take a solid performance by a goalie to outshine Alex Ovechkin in a game, but Ovechkin’s lackluster return to action today left the door open to get the spotlight stolen easily. Earning a shutout that helps him pass a Canadiens legend in Dryden helps pour a bit more salt in the wounds for Habs fans dealing with a miserable season.

PHT Morning Skate: Teemu homecoming day edition

Teemu Selanne

PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

Not only is it Teemu Selanne’s return to Winnipeg, but the current iteration of the Jets are fans of his too. Everyone loves Teemu. (Winnipeg Sun)

The Anaheim Ducks are even eager to share the wonder that is Teemu returning to where it all began for a day. (Ducks)

Down Goes Brown’s take on Teemu’s history is a damn fine hysterical tribute to the Finnish Flash. (Down Goes Brown)

Travis Zajac was really happy about his play in his first game back from a torn Achilles tendon. (Star-Ledger)

Tyler Seguin has finally been jinxed by the sophomore slump. (CSNNE.com)

Ken Dryden penned a fantastic piece on concussions and what Gary Bettman’s role in the league’s epidemic is. (Grantland)

Meanwhile in Chicago, Ray Emery is stealing the starting goaltending job. (CSNChicago.com)

Antero Niittymaki was a winner in his first AHL rehab start. (CSNBayArea.com)

Olli Jokinen may have his ups and downs, but he does well in his former hometowns. (Calgary Sun)

Francois Beauchemin is becoming one of the leaders of a Ducks team in desperate need of guidance. (OC Register)

Ken Hitchcock and Barry Trotz renew their friendly rivalry. They should surprise us all by playing firewagon hockey against each other to celebrate. (Tennessean)

What’s the Red Wings’ key to success on the power play? Moving the puck, stupid! (Detroit Free Press)

Boston being down 2-0 will look to Montreal and Pittsburgh for historic inspiration

Tim Thomas

It’s not an enviable position for the Boston Bruins to be in. They’re down 2-0 in the Stanley Cup finals to the Vancouver Canucks and since the expansion era began in the NHL in the 1966-1967 season only two teams have battled back from that to win the Stanley Cup. 25 of the last 27 teams that jumped out to a 2-0 lead went on to win Lord Stanley’s most prized possession.

The Bruins have already fought out of a 2-0 hole this year in the first round of the playoffs against Montreal. There the teams took care of each other on one another’s home ice through the first four games before seeing Boston win their final two home games in Games 5 and 7 to take the series, culminating with a Game 7 win in overtime thanks to Nathan Horton. But when it comes to the Stanley Cup finals, they’ll have to dig a bit deeper to find inspiration to comeback and win the series.

In 2009, the Pittsburgh Penguins dropped the first two games of the finals to Detroit and fought back from being down two games twice in those finals to win the series in seven games. Evgeni Malkin helped lead the charge for Pittsburgh while Marc-Andre Fleury stood on his head to help keep the Red Wings off the board. Malkin’s play was so inspiring that he took home the Conn Smythe Trophy at the end of everything. Considering that Pittsburgh had to win twice in Detroit in the final three games of the series to do it makes their feat all the more impressive.

The first team in the expansion era to pull off the 2-0 comeback was, of course, the Montreal Canadiens in 1971. That year the Habs got down 2-0 to the Chicago Blackhawks before winning the next two at home in Montreal. Home teams would all win each game except for Game 7 when the Habs beat Chicago 3-2 to take the Stanley Cup thanks to the work of Ken Dryden in goal and brothers Frank and Peter Mahovlich on the ice. Captain Jean Beliveau would make that Stanley Cup his tenth and final one as captain of the Canadiens.

For Boston, they’ll need to draw on the legacy of those Canadiens legends who defended their home ice perfectly and gutted it out to win on the road in Game 7, something that’s only happened three times in Stanley Cup history. Those Canadiens, the 1945 Maple Leafs, and those 2009 Penguins are the only ones to pull that off. Sure the Bruins don’t necessarily have to go seven games, they could rattle off four wins in a row and end it in six, with the way they’ve been outplayed at times through most of the first two games, seven games makes far more sense to work things out.

Much like with those past teams it’ll come down to goaltending and Tim Thomas will more than have his hands full dealing with the Canucks attack the rest of the way. While he’s played out of his mind, he’ll need better support from his defense and hope that they can eliminate the mistakes and not come up with bad turnovers and penalties that can lead to goals. Don’t expect Bruins captain Zdeno Chara to dwell on what’s been a rough couple of games for him.

History has shown that it can be done and while it hasn’t happened that often, the opportunity is there for Boston to take but it starts with one win.

The Hockey News lists its top 10 all-time rookie playoff performances

Ville Leino, Tuukka Rask

No doubt about it, Tyler Seguin made a huge impact in his first two career playoff appearances. Some even think that he’s been good enough to make Boston Bruins head coach Claude Julien look bad (even if his team managed to make the Eastern Conference finals without Seguin).

In the rush to crown Seguin the next big thing, it’s important to note that two games remain a small sample. Sure, his six-point start ties him for second place in NHL history for a player’s first two contests, but he has a way to go before he can join the ranks of the all-time best rookie playoff performers.

In a tribute to that sentiment (and also Seguin’s big night), Adam Proteau constructed his top 10 list of all-time rookie playoff performances for The Hockey News. The list includes memorable runs from Ken Dryden, Jeremy Roenick and even current Phoenix Coyotes GM Don Maloney.

First, here are the two active players who made the list:

9. Cam Ward, Hurricanes

Just 22 years old at the time, Ward tasted his first playoff action in 2006 when he replaced Canes starter Martin Gerber in Game 2 of the first round against the Canadiens. Ward never surrendered the role the rest of the way, winning 15 games (including two Game 7s) and claiming the Conn Smythe Trophy as Carolina won its first Stanley Cup.


5. Ville Leino, Flyers

Though Leino played seven playoff games with Detroit in 2009, he was also still considered a rookie in his second playoff season. Leino was a relatively old 26 when he suited up for Philadelphia in 2010, but made the most of it, setting a new league record for playoff rookie assists (14) and tying Ciccarelli’s record for rookie playoff points (21) set in 1981.

Some might have actually ranked Ward higher than Leino because he was arguably even more valuable to his team as he won the Conn Smythe and a Stanley Cup in 2006, but it’s tough to argue with Leino’s overall numbers.

Quite possibly the greatest goalie in NHL history and two scrappy overachievers round out the top three of Proteau’s list.

3. Claude Lemieux, Canadiens

One of the more underrated playoff performers in NHL history, Lemieux first showed his post-season chops as a 20-year-old in 1986, scoring 10 goals (including four game-winners) in 20 games and helping the Habs to another Cup.

2. Dino Ciccarelli, North Stars

A member of the most recent Hockey Hall of Fame class, the right winger was 21 and had only played 32 regular season games when the 1981 playoffs began. He then set a rookie record for post-season goals (14) and points (21) in 19 games for a North Stars team that lost the Cup final in five games to the Islanders.

1. Patrick Roy, Canadiens

The Canadiens legend was just 20 years old in 1986 when he powered the Habs to the Stanley Cup and won the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP thanks to 15 wins and a 1.93 goals-against average.

People often point the advantage of experience in the postseason, but those 10 players rank among the players who were quick learners. Will Seguin force his way onto later top 10 lists like this in the future? He’ll need to keep his hot streak going to have a chance.