Tag: Kansas City

Sprint Center - Kansas City

Relocation audition time? Kings-Penguins game in Kansas City sold out


Every year the NHL plays a preseason game in Kansas City at the Sprint Center. This season, two non-regional teams are dueling in the city of barbecue and blues music in the Los Angeles Kings and Pittsburgh Penguins. While the Penguins won’t be bringing Sidney Crosby and the Kings still don’t have Drew Doughty at their disposal, the game is still a sellout success in K.C.

Officials have declared the game a sellout. Standing-room tickets were to go on sale Tuesday morning for what is expected to be the largest crowd ever for a preseason game in a non-NHL market in North America.

That’s a quantum leap from the turnouts of the first two NHL exhibition games played at the Sprint Center when an announced crowd of 9,792 showed up in 2009 for the New York Islanders and Kings, which was down from the 11,603 for the 2008 game between the St. Louis Blues and a split squad of Kings.

So with a preseason hockey game being sold out in Kansas City and not having a handful of superstars even suiting up for it, that’s going to start up the questions about how viable the city is as a potential landing spot for a NHL franchise and who would even want to go there.

The race to have a place ready for a NHL team is a bizarre one as some cities are ready made for a team (like Kansas City) while others have outdated facilities (Seattle) and others are building new ones to attract a team (Quebec City). The teams that are having financial or arena issues are many and with Kansas City’s arena being ready to host either an NHL or NBA team at any time, Kansas City ends up being the first name thrown around.

Before CONSOL Energy Center was approved, Mario Lemieux threatened to move the Penguins there if they didn’t get a new arena approved in Pittsburgh. The Islanders have virtually always been linked to moving to K.C. and with Winnipeg out of the way, you might start hearing rumblings about the Coyotes departing for Kansas City in the near future. That kind of rumor mongering  might kick up in earnest if they don’t get a new owner or Glendale doesn’t pony up to cover losses again next year. Even Columbus gets tossed into the conversation thanks to their ability to bleed money in Ohio.

It’s a convenient landing spot because of it’s availability but is it one that makes any sense at all for the league? Not at all. Selling out a preseason game is nice but as The Kansas City Star said, it’s a first for the NHL in the city. Moving a NHL team to a city that’s not rabid about the sport is inviting trouble to that franchise.

The Coyotes have struggled mightily in Arizona, the Thrashers moved to Winnipeg, and the Avalanche after a great first ten years have a hard time filling the Pepsi Center these days. Winning has a lot to do with this part of things, but taking a struggling team to an area that at the very least is tepid to the sport has the makings for disaster. It’s great to take the game to cities like Kansas City that don’t have a lot of hockey these days and show off how great the game is, but unless the desire is there from the people there to want a team and shell out the big bucks for tickets, it’s a venture better left for preseason games and not taking a gamble on the future.

Where Business Journal’s rankings for NHL feasibility miss the mark

Nordiques Fans Hockey

Yesterday we took a look at Business Journal’s financial rankings to see which cities would be most fiscally capable of bringing the NHL to town. Cities like Houston and Las Vegas made the cut in impressive fashion while Canadian places like Quebec City and Hamilton were viewed as borderline possibilities as homes for the NHL.

While their rankings were financially based as far as how much money those cities have and ticket prices and their own methodology on things, having the money is only part of the equation as we’ve  seen already. After all, Atlanta ranked 11th on their list and is viewed as a sufficient city to play host to an NHL team. We’re not likely to see that happen again any time soon (or ever) but having good ownership and a consistently large fan base is what makes the biggest difference.

But when you see Riverside-San Bernadino, California rank out as the top city capable of hosting an NHL team while places like Quebec City (31st) and Hamilton, Ontario (33rd) are viewed as “borderline” there’s something amiss here. Sure we’ve seen the Kings be a success in southern California and the Ducks, while a bit off in attendance, have won a Stanley Cup, but would you run the risk of putting a team there just because the money exists there? No way.

The part where their ranking system fails is that it doesn’t take into account where the hockey fans are. Are there hockey fans in all these  cities? Sure there are, hockey love exists all over the place. But like Atlanta showed, even the most loyal of the die hard fans can’t keep a team there forever. Hell, the die hard fans in Phoenix might not be able to keep the Coyotes there with or without an owner and Phoenix is one of the biggest television markets in the United States.

It’s hard to take a ranking system seriously that puts cities that have AHL teams that struggle to draw fans ahead of a former NHL city that’s having a new arena built so as to attract an NHL team for relocation. Cities like Albany, NY ranked 23rd on this list and their AHL team was last in attendance in the league. Meanwhile Bridgeport-Stamford, CT was 3rd, Rochester, NY was 16th,  and Worcester, Massachusetts was 26th while all their teams are in the bottom ten in the AHL in attendance. If your city can’t come out and support hockey at the minor league level in a big way, that doesn’t bode well for a potential future as an NHL home.

Nordiques fans from Quebec City were able to bring one to two-thirds the number of fans the Albany Devils would draw on a regular night to games on Long Island and in New Jersey to show that they’ve still got the kinds of fans that want the NHL. With the economy being the way it is in the United States and the issues that can present to fans and owners alike, if teams are going to relocate or if there’s going to be (gulp) expansion, it’d make far more sense to go to where the fans are already there en masse.

The NHL tried to spread their footprint across America with their relocation and expansion efforts in the 90s and early 2000s and while some of those have worked out well, others are hurting or struggling still. While ownership issues helped force teams out of Winnipeg, Hartford, and Quebec City to places like Phoenix, Denver, and North Carolina the NHL would be wise to consider going to places where teams will instantly thrive.

So far the relocation movement back into Winnipeg is proving to be a success and with the rabid fan base there, things should thrive. If the Coyotes or Islanders or Blue Jackets are to run into major issues in the future that will force them to seek a new home, here’s to hoping that the NHL won’t be blinded by the potential dollars might be and go to where the money will continuously flow thanks to having a hardcore fan base already in place.

Could AEG’s plans to build an NFL stadium in LA crush Kansas City’s NHL dreams?

Sprint Center

Earlier in July, Matt called Kansas City’s Sprint Center a “forgotten arena.” Now it might be more appropriate to call it “abandoned.”

Such an idea is founded upon the ripple effect of the announcement that AEG (the company that owns both the Sprint Center and the Los Angeles Kings) put together a financial plan to build an NFL stadium in Los Angeles. Sam Mellinger of the Kansas City Star writes that the attention and investments put into that project would be so substantial that the Sprint Center – and it’s dream to host an NHL and/or NBA team – will probably be left in the dust.

The Sprint Center hasn’t seen anything beyond preseason games since it opened its doors in 2007, but this possibility could make the Pittsburgh Penguins-Los Angeles Kings exhibition far more bitter than sweat this summer. Here’s what Mellinger wrote about Tim Leiweke and AEG.

If you still hold out any hope for a team coming to the Sprint Center, you should know the company that bragged about making it all happen for us is no longer motivated to work on our behalf.

It’s telling that Leiweke is quoted constantly in the Los Angeles media but hasn’t talked to anyone in Kansas City in quite some time. He didn’t return multiple messages for this column.

He is among the most powerful men in sports and most visible figures in LA — sitting courtside at Lakers games — but he’s mostly a ghost when it comes to what was once presented in Kansas City.

The official line out of AEG is that Leiweke will comment when something meaningful happens, which realistically means never.

Ouch. To be fair to Leiweke and AEG, it really might not be about neglect. It would be one thing if it seemed like they lost interest in trying to remedy the situation immediately after the arena was built. Instead, the Sprint Center received attention in relocation rumors for the better part of four years, but nothing seems to work out.

Yet for all the doom and gloom, it’s far from safe to assume that something good won’t ever happen for Kansas City. The NBA’s possible lockout could force teams to either relocate or contract altogether. The NHL still has its fair share of franchises who are losing money, with the New York Islanders ranking among the teams that need a new arena the most.

It’s tough to deny the notion that this is another setback for the market’s hopes of landing a professional sports team, but it’s too early to give up on their long-term prospects. Things change quickly in the atmosphere of sports ownership. If you don’t believe me, take a look at the Winnipeg Jets.

(H/T to Sean Leahy of Puck Daddy.)

The forgotten arena: The Sprint Center in Kansas City

Los Angeles Kings v St. Louis Blues

Most of the time, NHL teams and their arenas have the same types of problems. The Islanders live in the old, Nassau Coliseum and are desperately trying to get funding for a better home on August 1. They went through a similar situation with the Lighthouse Project referendum last summer. Edmonton residents are also going through a taxpayer/arena debate revolving around a downtown home to replace Rexall Place. The teams and cities may change, but the story is usually the same: an NHL team needs a new place to play because the old arena isn’t cutting it anymore.

Then, in the middle of the United States, there’s a curious case of the Sprint Center in Kansas City. It’s peculiar because their problem is the contradicts just about every other arena dispute in any other sport. The fine folks in Kansas City have already forked out taxpayer money and have already built a beautiful, state-of-the-art building that would be great for hockey. Now they just need a team to fill the building.

Unlike the residents of Nassau County, taxpayers have already agreed to a publically funded building. They did so without the tangible benefit of a team already in town. No, their problem isn’t a suitable building—it’s getting a team to play in the building. Luc Robitaille was the point man to find a permanent tenant for Anschutz Entertainment Group (AEG) when the Sprint Center opened its doors in 2006.  He’s seen the obstacles to bringing hockey Kansas City.

“You have to have some kind of local buyer. I don’t know to what level were the talks in Kansas City, but there were some rumblings from time to time. But you have to have a buyer. What happened with Winnipeg is they had this buyer who was willing to do whatever it took for that.”

It’s been five years since the Sprint Center opened for business and it’s never been further from landing a team. First there was the possibility of the Pittsburgh Penguins relocating to Missouri. Then there were rumors that Boots Del Biaggio would buy the Predators to relocate the team to Kansas City. But after both of those deals fell through and the respective franchises stayed put, Kansas City and the Sprint Center have gradually fallen off the map.

A pair of preseason games with poor attendance certainly didn’t help the market’s cause either. A preseason game between the Coyotes and Kings only registered 11,603 tickets sold at the box office. The following year, the Islanders and Kings played in front of only 9,792 fans for a preseason game. It shouldn’t be surprising that Kansas City is barely even mentioned when a team is moving now.

Like Robitaille said, local ownership is a must if the Sprint Center is every going to house an NHL team. But for the market to be successful, fans in the area are going to have to be as passionate about the sport as any potential owner. True North and the residents of Winnipeg had the passion and determination to make it happen when the Atlanta Thrashers became available. Kansas City and their beautiful arena weren’t even on the radar. If the city of Glendale is unable to get a deal worked out with a new ownership group before the 2012-13 season, there’s a very good chance that the Coyotes will be on the move as well. There’s probably not a better arena in all of North America that is looking for an NHL tenant. But is there a demand to bring professional hockey back to Kansas City?

Until there is a local ownership group willing to make it happen, the building and fans will just have to settle for concerts and Big XII basketball.