Tag: Jason Garrison

Tyler Johnson, Nikita Kucherov, Ondrej Palat

Tampa Bay Lightning ’15-16 Outlook


Tampa Bay’s mantra going into this summer might as well have been “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

It certainly seems that was Lightning GM Steve Yzerman’s philosophy as a trip to the Stanley Cup Final has led to a quiet offseason. At the same time, there is still the potential for organic, internal changes.

Forward Jonathan Drouin might find himself playing a bigger role next season after getting limited minutes in 2014-15 and barely participating in the playoffs. He has a ton of offensive upside as illustrated by his back-to-back 100-plus point seasons with the Halifax Mooseheads. If the 20-year-old forward can build off of his 32-point rookie campaign, then he will be complimenting an already deep offensive core.

At the same time, netminder Andrei Vasilevskiy’s rise last season has changed the dynamic of Tampa Bay’s goaltending. While Ben Bishop is still the team’s starter, Vasilevskiy should start pushing him for ice time. The potential is also there for a goaltending controversy should Bishop endure a sustained cold streak.

We might also see defenseman Slater Koekkoek earn a regular spot with the Lightning after playing in three contests with Tampa Bay in 2014-15. He was the 10th overall pick in the 2012 NHL Entry Draft and might become a significant threat with the puck and factor with the man advantage.

For the most part though, the status quo is expected to remain. Victor Hedman, Anton Stralman, and Jason Garrison should once again lead Tampa Bay’s blueline. Stamkos remains the centerpiece of the offense while the hope is that the Triplets line of Tyler Johnson, Nikita Kucherov, and Ondrej Palat has another strong campaign.

The Lightning got a lot out of that core last season, which has earned them another chance to pursue a championship together.

Despite rumors, Linden says Canucks haven’t tried to trade Higgins

Chris Higgins

On Monday, Canucks president Trevor Linden addressed trade rumblings surrounding one of his team’s most veteran skaters, Chris Higgins.

“Chris Higgins is an important player on our team,” Linden said in a statement, per The Province. “We have not talked to any clubs about trading him.

“We value Chris both for his on-ice abilities and his leadership in the locker-room.”

That Linden responded to the Higgins rumors was telling… because, um, Linden’s kinda the reason they’re out there.

Last week, he and Vancouver GM Jim Benning caught heat during a ticketholder event, as fans voiced their displeasure over the club’s offseason moves. Benning was actually booed after revealing he could’ve traded veteran goalie Ryan Miller rather than fan favorite Eddie Lack.

After the event, Linden reportedly pulled aside some of the more vocal attendees for a mini-hotstove.

From The Province:

It was not an easy night for Linden or Benning.

“When you’re sitting in this chair, it’s not as easy as you think,” Linden said.

What he did do, when it was over, was call over the biggest critics of the night for a 10-minute session.

It was a nice gesture, but may have been ill-advised.

In it, Linden revealed several tidbits, including his pitch that the Canucks have been trying to trade Chris Higgins but have found they cannot move his contract.

In short order, the comments were all over social media, and then on the radio. The Higgins trade horse is officially out of the barn.

Maybe they’re hoping something will change in August — unlikely — or people will forget to ask Higgins when he comes back to town in two months. Again, unlikely.

(Take this for what it’s worth, but one attendee apparently recapped meeting Linden on HF Boards.)

It’s hard to know where this leaves Higgins, 32, who’s heading into the third of a four-year, $10 million deal with a pretty affordable $2.5M average annual cap hit. It’s not a Benning contract; Higgins was extended by Benning’s predecessor, Mike Gillis, and the deal includes a Gillis staple — a no-trade clause (granted, it’s a limited NTC.)

As such, it wasn’t surprising to hear rumors of the Canucks trying to move Higgins. Benning’s already shipped out Gllis-era holdovers like Lack, Kevin Bieksa, Zack Kassian, Jason Garrison, Ryan Kesler and Tom Sestito in his attempt to reshape the club — in that light, it would make sense that Higgins, who had 12 goals and 36 points last year, was dangled in potential trade talks.

Unless, of course, he wasn’t.

Video: Filppula connects on brilliant pass to tie Game 5

Things look awfully tenuous for the Tampa Bay Lightning in Game 5, especially with Nikita Kucherov still MIA. A tying goal can really allow some sunshine to sneak through, though.

The Bolts’ aggressiveness paid off against the Chicago Blackhawks in the second period, as Jason Garrison eventually sent this outstanding pass to Valtteri Filppula, who managed to settle the puck down enough to tuck it in:

Just like that, the game is tied 1-1; the Lightning drew a penalty that didn’t result in a goal, yet it feels like the tenor of Game 5 just changed. At least for a stretch.

Crawford says performance ‘not good enough,’ Coach Q says ‘just OK’

Corey Crawford

TAMPA — Game 2 of the Stanley Cup Final wasn’t a banner night for starting goalies.

Ben Bishop surrendered three goals before exiting the game, twice, under mysterious circumstances. The second time, he left for good.

As for Corey Crawford? Four goals allowed on 24 shots, one ugly one to Tyler Johnson, and some less-than-stellar performance reviews.

The first, from his head coach!

Q. What is your assessment of Crawford in this one tonight?


Crawford’s self-assessment was equally blunt.

“It’s frustrating,” he explained. “I felt good but it’s not good enough”

“I can’t let that happen again.”

The final two goals — surrendered to Jason Garrison and Tyler Johnson — annoyed Crawford, but the latter irked him the most, a bank shot scored from a bad angle.

“I don’t want to give that up,” Crawford said. “I don’t think he was trying to do that. He kind of fanned on his backhand, hit the side of the net, I don’t know if it bounced up, I kind of lost it from there, but I felt something on my back.

“You can’t give those up in these games. That’s two goals I pretty much just gave them and gave them momentum back.”

Of course, rough playoff reviews aren’t anything new for Crawford. He’s faced plenty of criticism over the last few years about his play — in 2013, much was written about Boston exposing his glove hand; last year, he finished the Western Conference Final against the Kings with an .878 save percentage; in this year’s opening round, he was parked in favor of Scott Darling after two shaky outings against Nashville.

Yet Crawford is the same guy that’s won over 40 postseason games in five years, with a .920 save percentage and 2.26 GAA. He’s also the same guy that helped Chicago win a Cup two seasons ago.

That’s probably why, regardless of games like tonight, the Blackhawks have consistently had his back.

“I don’t really follow media the way you guys do so I don’t know what’s said or not outside,” ‘Hawks defenseman Johnny Oduya said. “In the locker room, we know what kind of player he is. He’s always been tremendous here. He’s a hard competitor. He loves the game.

“Every time it’s on the line, we know we can trust him.”

Sharp apologetic, takes responsibility for costly third-period penalties

2015 NHL Stanley Cup Final - Game Two

TAMPA — For Patrick Sharp, Saturday was a night to forget.

Or more specifically, a third period to forget.

The veteran forward took two crucial penalties in the final frame of tonight’s Game 2 loss of the Stanley Cup Final, with the second paving the way for Jason Garrison to score the Bolts’ game-winner.

“It was something I don’t think I’ve ever done before,” Sharp said of taking back-to-back penalties. “It happened. You move on from it.

“I take responsibility and apologize to our penalty killers for putting them under such stress.”

Sharp’s first infraction, a slash on Anton Stralman, was called shortly after Marian Hossa got away with interference on Ben Bishop for Chicago’s 3-3 goal early in the third period. While the ‘Hawks were able to kill that one off, they had no such luck with Sharp’s second infraction — a high-stick on Ryan Callahan.

“We were battling and I guess my stick came up and clipped him,” he explained. “I didn’t mean to do it. It happens. I’ll take responsibility.

“It’s tough to put your penalty kill in a situation like that.”

The Garrison goal was Tampa’s first on the power play in this series, after the Bolts went 0-for-2 with the man advantage in Game 1.

Chicago has, for the most part, done a good job of staying out of the box this postseason — averaging the fourth-fewest PIM per game of all 16 teams to make the dance — and that’s probably a good thing; the ‘Hawks are only killing penalties at a 75.9 percent clip in the playoffs, down from 83.4 in the regular season.

As for the legitimacy of his penalties — Stralman did go down somewhat easy on the slashing call — Sharp took the high road, and didn’t go anywhere near criticizing the officials.

“They made the calls,” he said. “I guess I gotta be less careless with my stick. I didn’t think I made too much contact on the first one.”

“But I’m not arguing with the call.”