Tag: Jason Arnott

Martin Brodeur, Mark Fraser, Brian Boyle, Brandon Prust

Eastern Conference finals preview: Rangers vs. Devils, playoff experience


One of the most popular “head to head” angles at this stage of the season is playoff experience. With that in mind, let’s take a look at the playoff resumes from both New York and New Jersey

New York Rangers

Most postseason games:

Ruslan Fedotenko (102), Brad Richards (77), Mike Rupp (57), Henrik Lundqvist (49), Marian Gaborik (48).

Stanley Cup finals appearances:

Fedotenko (2004, 2009), Richards (2004), Rupp (2003).

Stanley Cups won:

Fedotenko (2004, 2009), Richards (2004), Rupp (2003).


Richards won the Conn Smythe in 2004 with an all-time performance: 26 points in 23 games, seven PP goals and seven game-winning tallies.

Fedotenko and Rupp scored back-to-back Cup-winning goals, both in Game 7s. Rupp scored at 2:22 of the second period to beat the Ducks in 2003, Fedotenko scored at 14:38 of the second to beat the Flames.

New Jersey Devils

Most postseason games:

Martin Brodeur (193), Patrik Elias (150), Petr Sykora (127), Dainius Zubrus (80), Anton Volchenkov (73), Bryce Salvador (62), Steve Bernier (56).

Stanley Cup finals appearances:

Sykora (2000, 2001, 2003, 2008, 2009), Brodeur (1995, 2000, 2001, 2003), Elias (2000, 2001, 2003), Volchenkov (2007), Zubrus (1997).

Stanley Cups won:

Brodeur (1995, 2000, 2003), Elias (2000, 2003), Sykora (2000, 2009)


Alexei Ponikarovsky has played in 50 playoff games.

Elias famously assisted on Jason Arnott’s Cup-winning goal in 2000.

Brodeur has never won the Conn Smythe trophy despite winning three Cups.


The only real distinct difference between the two teams is behind the bench, where John Tortorella (71 playoff games) is vastly more experienced than Peter DeBoer (12).

Torts led the Lightning to the Stanley Cup in 2004 in a decidedly different fashion to what the Rangers are doing this year — the ’04 Bolts  beat the Islanders 4-1 in the opening round before sweeping Montreal in Round 2.

Report: Blues sale to close Wednesday

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According to the Globe and Mail, the sale of the St. Louis Blues to a group led by the club’s minority owner, Tom Stillman, is expected to be approved tomorrow by the NHL and close Wednesday.

The $130-million (all currency U.S.) purchase will see Stillman buy the Blues, their American Hockey League team, the management rights to the Scottrade Center, and a share of the Peabody Opera House from Dave Checketts and TowerBrook Capital Partners LP, an investment fund.

The group put together by Stillman consists of people prominent in St. Louis business circles. The most well-known among them is the Taylor family, which owns Enterprise Holdings Inc., which operates Enterprise Rent-A-Car, National Car Rental and Alamo Rent A Car.

It’s not clear what effect the change in ownership will have on the club’s budget, if any.

Post-Dispatch columnist Bernie Miklasz scoffs at the notion the team will go on a wild spending spree.

I continue to be astounded by the unrealistic expectations awaiting the Blues’ prospective new owner, Tom Stillman. I think some in the media have done everyone a disservice by perpetuating the myth that Stillman will come in here and start making it rain like PacMan Jones in a gentlemen’s club. Here’s the deal: while I look forward to Stillman taking over to provide stability and hands-on, on-the-ground ownership, it’s really silly to assume that he’s bringing a lot of cash money into this endeavor. I’ve heard media folks talk about how Stillman has lined up the Taylor family other big financial shooters in the STL community. Yes, he has. But he’s lined them up to help him finance the purchase of the franchise. And that’s it. These wealthy folks won’t be funneling an endless supply of cash to Stillman.

It figures to be a busy summer for Doug Armstrong, the team’s general manager. Jason Arnott, Jamie Langenbrunner, Barret Jackman and Carlo Colaiacovo are all set to become unrestricted free agents on July 1, while TJ Oshie, David Perron and Chris Stewart are pending restricted free agents.

Video: Anze Kopitar almost ruined Dustin Brown after his empty net goal

Dustin Brown, Anze Kopitar

Seeing the L.A. Kings close out the St. Louis Blues resulted in celebration all over Los Angeles, a party that all started when Dustin Brown sealed the victory with his empty net goal with seconds remaining in the third.

For Brown, however, things were euphorically dangerous as he was pounced on by Anze Kopitar upon burying the puck in the net. Brown tells John Hoven of Mayor’s Manor after the game that Kopitar almost took him out with his celebratory Lou Thesz press.

“[Kopitar] almost killed me in the celebration,” Brown said. “I don’t think he realizes how big and strong he is.”

That kind of stuff reminds me of seeing Brendan Shanahan get tackled by Steve Yzerman after icing the 2002 Stanley Cup finals as well as Alexander Radulov giving Jason Arnott a concussion in the 2007 playoffs thanks to an aggressive celebration. Thankfully, Brown wasn’t hurt.

If you missed it, have a look at the series-clinching goal and the mayhem that followed it at Staples Center.

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And then there were seven: Blues swept out of Western Conference semifinal


The Los Angeles Kings defeated the St. Louis Blues 3-1 in Game 4 of their Western Conference semifinal, sweeping the series 4-0. The Kings have now ousted the No. 1 (Vancouver) and No. 2 (St. Louis) seeds out of the playoffs with a combined 8-1 record.

As for the Blues…

What happened?

The St. Louis power play failed at the most inopportune time. The Blues went 0-for-17 in the series after going 6-for-18 against the Sharks in Round 1 and allowed LA to score twice while shorthanded.

All told, the Blues went 0-for-31 on the PP against the Kings this year.

Brian Elliott was also badly outplayed by Jonathan Quick in goal — the St. Louis ‘tender was shaky over the final three games of the series, allowing nine goals on 62 shots (an .822 save percentage) and letting in several questionable goals in Game 3.

Who takes the blame?

Elliott will take some heat, though the sweep can hardly be pinned on him. The Blues showed a real lack of discipline throughout the series, mostly notably in the do-or-die Game 4 (Lou Korac of NHL.com notes the Blues took five offensive zone penalties in the 3-1 loss.) The power play dried up — as mentioned above — but the offense wasn’t much better at regular strength. St. Louis only scored six goals the entire series and got zero points from TJ Oshie, Patrik Berglund and Alex Steen.

What will they do about it?

Even though it ended badly, this was a good year for the Blues. They made the playoffs for the first time in three years and finished with 109 points, their most since 1999-2000. So don’t expect many significant changes to the group.

That said, GM Doug Armstrong has plenty of decisions to make this summer. Free agents include Oshie (RFA), David Perron (RFA), Chris Stewart (RFA), Barret Jackman (UFA), Jason Arnott (UFA) and Jamie Langenbrunner (UFA) — it’ll also be curious to see if Armstrong and head coach Ken Hitchcock continue with the goalie tandem of Elliott and Jaroslav Halak, or attempt to move one. Neither goalie has no-trade/movement clause.


And then there were 15: Is Detroit’s dynasty on its last legs?

And then there were 14: Sharks come out flat in playoffs

And then there were 13: Powerhouse Pens fall flat

And then there were 12: Presidents’ Trophy-winning Canucks bounced in Round 1

And then there were 11: Another first-round exit for Blackhawks

And then there were 10: Bruins run out of Game 7 magic

And then there were 9: Senators out, but future’s bright

And then there were 8: Panthers go out swinging

Tale of the Tape: Blues vs Kings

LOS ANGELES, CA - MAY 03: Alex Pietrangelo #27 of the St. Louis Blues moves the puck in front of Dwight King #74 of the Los Angeles Kings in the second period in Game Three of the Western Conference Semifinals during the 2012 NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs at Staples Center on May 3, 2012 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

On Sunday, the Los Angeles Kings will host the St. Louis Blues in Game 4 of their Western Conference semifinal (12:30 pm ET, NBC). The Kings lead the series 3-0; here’s a look at recent history between the two clubs.

Leading scorers

Los Angeles: Dustin Brown (4G-5A-9PTS) | Andy McDonald (5G-5A-10PTS)

Starting goalies

Los Angeles: Jonathan Quick (7-1, 1.62 GAA) | Brian Elliott (3-3, 2.43 GAA)


Los Angeles won season series 3-1

Oct. 18: At Los Angeles 5, St. Louis 0
Nov. 22: Los Angeles 3, at St. Louis 2
Feb. 3: At St. Louis 1, Los Angeles 0
Mar. 22: At Los Angeles 1, St. Louis 0, SO

Game 1: Los Angeles 3, St. Louis 1

How bad have the St. Louis Blues been in this series? Well, David Backes scored the first goal of the series at 9:16 of the first period and Slava Voynov tied the game 7:52 minutes later. That is the only length of time that the Blues have ever had the lead in this entire series.

Matt Greene scored the game-winning goal while the Kings were shorthanded. Dustin Penner sealed the deal with an empty netter at 19:45 of the third period.

Brian Elliott has taken some heat for his play in this series, but he held his own in Game 1. However, things only went downhill from here for the Blues…

Game 2: Los Angeles 5, St. Louis 2

This is the first time in the playoffs that Jaroslav Halak’s ankle injury became a big problem for the Blues. Elliott allowed four goals on 16 shots in the first period.

Under normal circumstances, that’s bad enough to warrant a goaltender swap. Even if you want to argue that, given how one-sided the first period was, Elliott doesn’t deserve all of the blame, switching netminders might have sparked the team. However, with Halak gone, the Blues had no alternative with NHL experience.

Goaltender Jake Allen actually did end up getting a bit of time between the pipes, but it was a mere 1:07 minute cameo and he didn’t face a single shot on goal.

St. Louis did significantly better over the final 40 minutes, but they couldn’t get much by Jonathan Quick. With that, the Kings improved to 5-0 on the road in the 2012 playoffs.

Game 3: Los Angeles 4, St. Louis 2
For a team already down 2-0 in the series, the Blues couldn’t get much done in this game. They only managed four shots over the first 20 minutes and it was the Kings’ Justin Williams who scored the first goal of the game.

The Blues were beaten in almost every conceivable way as the Los Angeles Kings established their second straight 3-0 series lead.

The Kings got help from unlikely sources, including Dwight King, who netted his first goal of the postseason. However, a number of their best players, including Mike Richards, Anze Kopitar, and Drew Doughty carried the brunt of the load.

Quick only needed to stop 18 shots to earn his fourth straight victory. He has allowed three or more goals in just one start in the Kings’ postseason run.


St. Louis: Jaroslav Halak (ankle), Jason Arnott (lower body)

Los Angeles: Simon Gagne (concussion), Kevin Westgarth (hand), Scott Parse (hip)