Tag: Jarome Iginla

Joe Sakic

Sakic says Avs ownership gave ‘green light’ to ‘make this team win’


Coming off their first playoff appearance since 2010 — and with a whole crop of exciting young talent, headlined by the explosive Nathan MacKinnon — the Colorado Avalanche are hoping they can keep the momentum going on the ice in 2014-15.

At the same time, the club’s ownership is hoping for a bit more off-ice success, since there’s still a long ways to go in the ticket-sales department, and the Avs are back up among the NHL’s payroll leaders.

“We’re a cap team now, despite us being in the bottom five of the league in ticket revenue,” president of hockey ops told the Denver Post. “Even knowing that, [ownership] still want to win a championship and gave us the green light to do whatever we can to make this team win.”

A pair of NHL sources told the Post that the Avs’ season-ticket base is “around 6,500,” leaving no shortage of seats to sell on an individual game basis.

The Avs averaged 16,295 fans in 2013-14, ranking them 22nd in league attendance. That was an increase over the previous season (15,444), and it was a big increase compared to 2009-10, when the club bottomed out at 13,947. But attendance was still significantly below the level of the league’s top spenders, most of whom play to capacity crowds on a nightly basis, with high ticket prices to boot.

For Sakic, ownership’s willingness to increase spending (yes, the Avs lost Paul Stastny to free agency, but they also brought in Jarome Iginla) will mean added pressure to avoid a regression in 2014-15 — something, it should be noted, that many are predicting for Colorado.

Related: Avs hope to learn from ‘nightmare’ playoff finish

B’s Lucic admits his wrist isn’t fully healed

Boston Bruins v Detroit Red Wings - Game Three

Some might argue that the Boston Bruins took a half-step (or more) backward this offseason due to salary cap challenges, but the team still looks formidable on paper. They might not be able to pencil Milan Lucic in at full force to start the season, though.

The hulking forward admitted to CSNNE.com that his surgically repaired left wrist isn’t quite back to 100 percent just yet.

“I feel like I’ve turned the corner in the last week or week-and-a-half, so that’s a positive. But I’m still working to get it up to 100 percent,” Lucic said. “I’m just excited to be back with everyone, and to get things going. You don’t want to do anything to have any setbacks, so you have to be smart about it. It’s turned the corner for the better as far as rehab has gone.”

The 26-year-old wore a hard cast that extended from his elbow to his hand for most of this summer, greatly limiting his ability to work out his upper-body this summer, as he told CSNNE.com. While he has time to build back up – again, he seems positive about the last couple weeks of progress – there’s at least some concern that he’ll take awhile to rebound to his usual intimidating form.

(Don’t expect him to resemble a “string bean” anytime soon, though.)

Should Lucic shoot more often once he’s healthy?

Lucic spoke about the “mental part to get over when it comes to shooting, and everything else on the ice” as well, which brings up an interesting point: the B’s might want to ask Lucic to fire the puck more often, at least long-term.

The big winger only fired 153 shots on goal last season, meaning he averaged fewer than two shots on net per game. His career average (811 in 485 regular season contests), is well off the two-per-game mark, too.

Considering his power, ability to fight through checks and impressive accuracy (his career shooting percentage is an outstanding 14.9), Boston might want to start whispering in his ear to maybe be just a touch less selective.

That might come naturally, though. After skating alongside obvious finishers in Jarome Iginla and Nathan Horton, David Krejci seemed excited by the prospect of Loui Eriksson bumping up his goal totals, so one can only imagine what kind of impact that might have on Lucic’s approach. Again, it may be wise to push for higher shot volumes when he feels comfortable, though.

This is not to say that Lucic should just fire the puck away without any thought regarding context, but more shots from that talented forward seems like it could only be a good thing.

Glencross already getting questions about waiving his no-movement clause

Curtis Glencross

With no contract extension yet signed, and with little apparent willingness to take another home-town discount, Flames forward Curtis Glencross is already fielding questions about the trade deadline.

If he’s still a pending UFA at the deadline, would he be willing to waive his no-movement clause?

“That’s too far down the road,” the 31-year-old said, per the Calgary Sun. “Hopefully we don’t have to go that far. We’ll have to see what happens when it comes that time.

“Obviously, the ball’s in my court with my no-move clause in my last year here (but) I just want to get through training camp, get the season started and get things going.”

Calgary hockey fans are, of course, very familiar with this sort of storyline. Former captain Jarome Iginla was constantly barraged with questions about his willingness to accept a trade, before he was finally dealt to Pittsburgh in 2013.

The Glencross situation is not quite (or even close to being) at that point yet, but one does wonder if there’s a fit between an over-30 forward who’s looking to cash in on free agency and a hockey club that’s still in the rebuilding stage.

“I love Calgary. I love the Flames organization. My last contract proves that I love this organization,” said Glencross. “But I’ve seen the contracts that are going out now and the comparables, and I’m not going to sell myself short.”

Did Iginla not sign in Tampa Bay because Denver’s youth hockey is better?

Buffalo Sabres v Pittsburgh Penguins

Over at SB Nation, Bolts blog Raw Charge has a lengthy, interesting Q&A with former Lightning GM (and current executive director of community hockey development) Jay Feaster, which includes this nugget:

RC: The word is that Jarome Iginla ultimately chose to sign with the Colorado Avalanche instead of the Lightning largely due to the caliber of the Denver area’s youth hockey programs.

JF: Yeah, I don’t know. I’ve heard that rumor as well. I haven’t spoken to Jarome. I know Jarome well, but I haven’t spoken to him as to whether or not that’s true. It isn’t just in terms of having it be strong and vibrant in terms of a recruiting tool. But it’s also a case where we don’t want young people to have to feel that they need to leave the state when they get to be really good players at the age of 14, 15, 16.

It’s an interesting anecdote, especially given what Martin St. Louis had to say after demanding a trade out of Tampa Bay last spring.

“One of my biggest things, honestly, is I never see my kids play hockey,” St. Louis said, per the Tampa Bay Times. “Just, for instance, my oldest has gone, since September, to Detroit three times, Pittsburgh, Chicago, Rochester, Atlanta. You’ve got to go outside the state to play pretty good competition. My wife and dad flies with him.

“I’m not saying Florida hockey is no good, but if you want to play against good competition you have to go outside.”

Again, this is all speculation — Feaster said he only heard the rumors — but it’s worth noting that, following a 16-year stint in Calgary, Iginla has changed cities three times and may be increasingly focused on his family’s surroundings. The 37-year-old has three children — daughter Jade, his oldest, and two younger boys, Tij and Joe — and, upon signing in Boston last season, made a conscious decision to move his family well in advance of the season to acclimate to the new digs.

“[My] kids start school [Wednesday], so I wanted to get here early and get as many kinks out as far as knowing the practice-route drive or learning a bit about Boston downtown, and also having some fun and just relaxing here,” he said, per NHL.com. “It is nice to be here a couple of weeks before camp and just to feel comfortable.”

With training camps looming, a look at some key unsigned RFAs

Ryan Johansen

Potential holdouts, anyone? Here’s your primer for all the talented youngsters than remain unsigned into September…

Ryan Johansen, Columbus

The most talked about of the group, Johansen’s currently embroiled in a contract stalemate that could result with him missing training camp. Columbus GM Jarmo Kekalainen’s on record saying he doesn’t want the 22-year-old to miss any camp time (“It’s very, very important that we start as a team,” he told the Dispatch) but at this point, there’s a reported $3-$3.5M gap between what the club is offering and what Johansen’s agent, Kurt Overhardt, is asking for.

Both sides have a decent amount of leverage. Columbus will argue that Johansen only has one quality NHL campaign on his resume, doesn’t have arbitration rights and has yet to receive an offer sheet from another club. The Johansen camp will counter that last year’s effort was much more than a quality campaign (he finished 11th in the NHL with goals, 33, and was the team’s most important player not named Sergei Bobrovsky.) Overhardt could also use the Jackets’ success against them — the club is coming off the best season in franchise history. Do they really want to kill that momentum by playing hardball with their brightest young star?

Torey Krug and Reilly Smith, Boston

Both players have fallen victim — thus far — to the Bruins’ ugly cap situation, explained here by the Boston Globe:

The Bruins are in a jam. They have approximately $69 million committed toward 2014-15. This includes Marc Savard’s $4,027,143 annual cap hit and roughly $4.75 million in overage penalties (bonuses achieved last year by Jarome Iginla, Torey Krug, and Dougie Hamilton) they must apply toward their number.

By opening night, they will use the long-term injury exception on Savard to exceed the cap by his average annual value. But even when accounting for that deletion, the Bruins have little breathing room to re-sign Krug and Reilly Smith.

It would be possible to re-up Krug and Smith without moving salary; it would not be preferable. Management would have close to zero roster flexibility to trade or sign players or carry extra bodies.

A trade, therefore, is coming.

Neither Krug nor Smith have suggested they’d hold out of camp but, earlier this summer, reports surfaced of Krug getting a “big” offer from a KHL club.

Nino Niederreiter and Darcy Kuemper, Minnesota

Wild GM Chuck Fletcher has a tricky situation on his hands — he must deal with this year’s RFAs while keeping an eye on next year’s class, which will include the likes of Mikael Granlund, Charlie Coyle and Erik Haula. As such, Fletcher has repeatedly stressed the importance of making the “right deal” for Niederreiter and Kuemper, and it sounds as though the latter is looking for a bigger (or, better) deal than the one Minnesota is offering.

“Darcy certainly has great potential and played very well in stretches for us this season, but at the end of the day I think he’s played around 30 games in the NHL,” Fletcher told the Star-Tribune earlier this month. “Usually this isn’t the time to fight for the big contract. We feel Darcy right now is trying to establish himself in the league and once he does that it’ll be a little simpler to come up with terms.”

That said, it doesn’t sound like the Wild are anticipating Kuemper to miss significant training camp/preseason time, as head coach Mike Yeo already said Kuemper would play one of Minnesota’s first three exhibition games.

Jaden Schwartz, St. Louis

Very quiet on this front lately. Blues GM Doug Armstrong has a reputation for dragging out RFA negotiations (see: Alex Pietrangelo) and playing hardball — just ask the Vladimir Sobotka camp. That said, the Blues do have approximately $2.7M in available cap space and a bit of roster flexibility, so the pieces are in place to get a deal done by the time training camp starts.

Tyson Barrie, Colorado

Many pundits figured the blueprint for Barrie’s new deal came last week, when Edmonton signed offensive defenseman Justin Schultz to a one-year, $3.675M contract. But that blueprint might not have looked like the one Colorado originally drew up — per the Denver Post, the Avs were reportedly looking at a deal that would pay Barrie $2.4-$3.5 million next season.

Danny DeKeyser, Detroit

In terms of value to his team, DeKeyser is right up there with Johansen in Columbus — the 24-year-old rearguard averaged 21:38 TOI for the Wings last year (upped to over 23 minutes per night in the playoffs) and scored 23 points in 65 games. But I sort of buried him in this piece because his new deal in Detroit is fait accompli — DeKeyser said he wants to be in Detroit and has no worries about a deal getting done, and GM Ken Holland has re-iterated most of the same.


Brenden Dillon and Cody Eakin remain unsigned in Dallas, but it’s important to remember that Stars GM Jim Nill came from the Detroit organization, where RFA deals often lingered right up until the start of training camp… Nashville and Ryan Ellis sound as though they’re still a ways apart on a new deal…The Rangers, who are approximately $1.5M away from the salary cap ceiling, still need to get something done with defenseman John Moore… Anaheim is still working on a contract for forward Devante Smith-Pelly, who had a fantastic postseason and led the team in playoff goals, with five.