Tag: Jamie Baker

Jeff Friesen

Best and worst sweaters of all-time: San Jose Sharks


It’s not easy wearing teal but the San Jose Sharks have made it look good for over 20 seasons in the NHL. Of course, sometimes teal doesn’t always look so nice and when you’re perpetually coming up short of the Stanley Cup that stings a bit. Regardless, the Sharks stick with it through good and bad and look good while doing so.

Best: Ahh the Sharks. Forever in teal since their inception (hey, everyone needed a team in teal) and always with a menacing shark adorning their sweaters. Chances are you either love the design and the look or you hate it. As for me, my favorite remains the original road teal sweater. It’s the one they wore during their crowning moment as a franchise in beating the Detroit Red Wings in 1994 and it’s forever etched into everyone’s memory thanks to Arturs Irbe and Jamie Baker. Love teal or hate it, it set the tone for how to embrace such an odd sports color.

Worst: That said, sometimes teal is a bad thing and when the Sharks updated their look to make it look a bit more modern, it turned the classic road teal sweater into a teal, black, and gray clusterbomb of color. Sure the shark on the front stayed the same, but the dorsal fin patch that looked so good on the original sweater was gone and the font on the numbers and letters was switched up to make names look muddled on the back. Messing with a good thing is wrong. Making Owen Nolan look bad is never a good thing.

Embracing orange: Oddly enough, when the Sharks redid their look with the RBK Edge system sweaters, they added a color to help make things pop. Out went the gray and in came the hint of orange. By adding orange to their look and numbers to the front of the sweater along with a tweaked out new-ish logo, the Sharks were able to make something virtually brand new and old-school looking. The love for orange was official when fans were given orange rally towels during the playoffs last season. Respect earned.

Assessment: The Sharks current sweaters are nice. Well, except for the overly dull “BlackArmor” third sweater that sucks all the color and life out of their look. Being ashamed of who you are (and that’s a team whose main color is still teal) doesn’t invoke any sort pride at all. If you want to find something silly and nonsensical to blame the Sharks playoff loss to Vancouver on last season, blame it on the BlackArmor. If the Sharks did away with that, they’d be sitting pretty.

Senators celebrate 20th anniversary by bringing back one of NHL’s all-time worst teams for opening night

Scotiabank Place

It might be hard for some of you to believe, but this upcoming season marks the Ottawa Senators’ 20th in the NHL. Let that sink in so some of you can now dwell on how old that makes you feel.

The Sens have big plans to help commemorate the season including wearing a special heritage jersey (which will look like the one seen at Icethetics) on opening night against the Minnesota Wild. Getting a hockey team back in Ottawa was a big deal for everyone involved and while the Sens have just one Stanley Cup finals appearance back in 2007 to hang their hat on and an avoided bankruptcy thanks to the big money of Eugene Melnyk buying the team, the Sens are doing something else on opening night that’s rather curious.

When Ottawa holds their home opener on October 11 against Minnesota, they’ll introduce the players that suited up in the team’s inaugural game. As the Ottawa Sun’s Bruce Garrioch points out, it’ll be a special night for the Sens.

All the players from the roster of the franchise’s inaugural game are being invited back to be introduced before the home opener, Oct. 11 against the Minnesota Wild. That should also cut down on the boos directed Dany Heatley’s way.

It seems like only yesterday that captain Laurie Boschman and his new teammates scored a 5-3 victory over the Montreal Canadiens on Oct. 8, 1992 at the Civic Centre.

“It does bring back a lot of memories,” said Boschman. “The important thing is that going into their 20th year, this team has been — if you take away the last couple of years — their record has been equal to anybody in the NHL.

“It’s been wonderful to be a hockey fan here and to raise three boys that are Senators fans. That’s what’s really neat.”

In that first game, the newly born Senators beat Montreal 5-3 on the strength of two goals from Doug Smail along with goals each from Neil Brady, Ken Hammond, and Sylvain Turgeon. Getting the win for the Sens that night in goal was Peter Sidorkiewicz while coach Rick Bowness led the way on the bench.

The win would indeed be special because they wouldn’t win another game until late November. That Senators team finished the year with a 10-70-4 record. Defenseman Norm Maciver led the team in points with 63 while Turgeon led the team in goals with 25. Poor Peter Sidorkiewicz would end the season going 8-46-3 with a 4.43 goals against average and .856 save percentage. While that Sens team wasn’t the worst team of all-time, they rank in the top five as one of the worst in NHL history. Hey, at least Mike Peluso was in the top five in the league in penalty minutes with 318. Yeah, he was just fifth that year.

Things have gotten better for Ottawa in recent years as they’ve been able to make the playoffs more often than not, but after a brutal season last year the fans are feeling a bit down. Captain Daniel Alfredsson is at least on the quick road to recovery to start the year, but if Sens fans can take solace in anything, it’s that no matter what, the current Senators can never be as bad as the original team.

At least they’d better hope not.

Joe Thornton’s suspension appeal shot down; crazy talk fills the air to support him


Suspended Sharks forward Joe Thornton, who received a two-game suspension for his illegal check to the head of Blues forward David Perron, filed an appeal with the NHL to try and overturn his suspension. As ESPN’s Pierre LeBrun found out, Thornton’s appeal was denied by the NHL and Thornton’s agent, John Thornton, had some choice words for the league about it.

John Thornton, Joe’s brother and agent, issued a scathing statement afterward: “The league once again failed to follow any precedent they have set when making disciplinary decisions. They stated this was most similar to the [Nick] Foligno hit [earlier this season]. which only resulted in a $2,500 fine.

“When Joe asked the league, directly, what he could have done differently, they could not clearly explain. I guess being 5’9″ was Joe’s only solution to avoid this suspension. We are extremely disappointed with the league’s decision and feel the continuing uncertainty with league actions will only hurt the fans of the NHL.”

The league, when told of John Thornton’s comments, declined to comment.

John Thornton’s comments are a bit out of hand, all things considered. After all, we’ve seen Chris Pronger use the height differential excuse for when he’s been busted for elbowing players in the head.  In this situation, Thornton’s height has nothing at all to do with him flying out of the penalty box and cranking an unsuspecting player in the head.  Thornton doesn’t have a history of doing these kinds of things, but in this case he’s in the wrong.

If you’re wondering about how Perron is doing after the fact, especially considering he stayed in the game and scored a goal against the Sharks, he missed tonight’s game with Boston because he was having headaches. Some fans and media, like Sharks broadcaster Jamie Baker, thought that Perron was embellishing the hit to help get Thornton punished.

That line of thinking is so completely ludicrous it’s stunning to think that a team would have a player do that in order to ensure an opposing player gets spanked by the league. Head injuries don’t always appear immediately and they should be taken seriously. In Jamie Baker’s case, as a former player himself, he should certainly know better.