Tag: Jack Adams Trophy


PHT makes the case for the Jack Adams Trophy finalists


Despite what many stodgy, humorless people will tell you, a lot of what happens in sports is out of peoples’ control. That’s especially the case in hockey. While NFL coaches micromanage their teams down to every last two-a-day practice, NHL bench bosses can only do so much in the constantly changing game of hockey.

That randomness creates a wild array of subjectivity when it comes to judging their decision making skills, but that’s part of the fun too, right? PHT breaks down the case for the three finalists nominated for the Jack Adams Award.

Joe Yerdon’s case for Dan Bylsma:

Injuries are a part of every coach’s routine in the NHL. You manage, you insert new guys into a lineup that was already clicking for you, and you deal with the fans, press, and team executives who all demand that you keep things going strong even if you’re without a star player. Dan Bylsma had to do all that and then some as he was without Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin for half the year and dealt with injuries to a host of other forwards.

While no one will feel too bad for a guy that coaches two of the best players in the world, keeping the team winning while playing without both of them for most of the year is beyond impressive. From Bylsma’s work to bring guys up to the AHL to help them blend in well to his work to make the team more of a defensive nightmare to face off against to taking the Penguins to fourth place in the Eastern Conference and one point away from winning the Atlantic Division over the Flyers is beyond impressive. The fact that the Pens won 49 games in spite of all the hardship makes him more than worthy of the Jack Adams Trophy.

Matt Reitz’s case for Barry Trotz:

Quick, name a forward on the Nashville Predators NOT named Mike Fisher.  Now think about the player you just selected—is that the kind of player you’d expect to lead a team to about 100 points each season?  There’s no way to look at the Predators’ crop of forwards and not wonder how they do it.  Their big free agent acquisition played two games for the Preds before he was knocked out for the season with a concussion.  Marcel Goc, Steve Sullivan, and Cal O’Reilly may not sound like big injuries—but these are some of Nashville’s most important forwards.  Still, Barry Trotz was able to have his entire team buy into their defense-first system and simply won games.  If anything, Trotz is a victim of  his own success. He’s done a great job for so long in Nashville that people just take it for granted.  But this season may have been his best.  The team was a contender in the tough Western Conference for one reason—they played like a team.

Honestly, he could win this award every season.  Sooner or later people will realize just how important Trotz is to the Nashville organization.  Take him away from the team and what do the Predators have?  On talent alone, they’re a lottery team.  With him, they’re a Western Conference contender.

James O’Brien’s case for Alain Vigneault:

In almost every team sport, people fall into “Bad News Bears” syndrome. Writers gravitate to the “big story,” so it only makes sense that they love it when a coach pushes an underdog bunch to relevance. Believe it or not, though, sometimes the best coach works with the best team and I believe that was the case with Vigneault this season.

His Canucks team lead the league in scoring, allowed the least amount of goals and was outstanding on the power play. They were a success by just about every regular season metric.

Looking past those impressive numbers, Vigneault navigated through defensive injury after injury and his team kept beating up opponents even after clinching everything. Aside from yawning through a couple games late in the season against Edmonton, the Canucks routinely beat desperate playoff teams when they had little to play for. That resilience through injuries and steady focus indicates a great group of players, for sure, but it also reveals a coach who captures his players’ attention.

Dan Bylsma, Barry Trotz, and Alain Vigneault named Jack Adams Trophy finalists; Who wins?

Dan Bylsma, Chris Lee

The NHL’s coach of the year award, the Jack Adams Trophy, always figures to be a hotly contested award and this year’s group of finalists are no different. With three different and intriguing cases to be made between Pittsburgh’s Dan Bylsma, Nashville’s Barry Trotz, and Vancouver’s Alain Vigneault, figuring out who wins the hardware this time around doesn’t figure to be any easier. There will be some controversy, however, over who was left out of the mix.

Dan Bylsma’s work in Pittsburgh to lead the Penguins to the fourth seed and very nearly winning the Atlantic Division title while playing half the season without Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin shows that it’s not always about the star players in order to be successful in the NHL. While Bylsma was without his superstars and a host of other injuries that limited the Penguins ability to ice their ideal starting lineup, he altered his game plan and his means of attacking and defending against opponents. Many other coaches would’ve struggled to adapt without their stars but Bylsma persevered in the face of roster armageddon.

Barry Trotz should essentially be nominated for this award every year as he’s able to put together a playoff team from a roster filled mostly with guys unrecognizable to the common fan. This season he led the Predators to the fifth seed in the Western Conference and thanks to Pekka Rinne they’ve gone deeper into the season than the franchise has ever been before. Each year Trotz has a team that’s a pain to play against, plays tough and physical, and most of all wins games. At some point Trotz is going to win this award because he just does his job excellently every year. Could this year finally be the one?

Vancouver’s Alain Vigneault has an easy case to make for the Adams Trophy. He coached the Canucks to the league’s best record and the Presidents’ Trophy. With the array of talent on the Vancouver roster from the Sedin twins to Ryan Kesler to Roberto Luongo, it’s tough to lose games with those guys. Instead, Vigneault led the team to the most wins in a season in franchise history and the Canucks’ best chance at a Stanley Cup in their 40 years in the NHL. His case for the award is pretty self explanatory.

The surprises lie in who didn’t make the cut as a finalist for the award. Tampa Bay’s Guy Boucher stands out as a snub and frankly we’re stunned as well. The expectations heading into this season for the Lightning were not very high and Boucher led them to the fifth seed in the Eastern Conference and had the Lightning on top of the Southeast Division for a good part of the season. While the three finalists all have great cases to be made to win the award, Boucher being left on the outside of the mix is stunning. Perhaps this was the voters way of rookie hazing. Other guys who could’ve deserved a look at the award as well are Rangers coach John Tortorella and Capitals coach Bruce Boudreau for his means of adapting philosophies and making the Capitals a tougher team to deal with.

As it stands, there are three very worthy coaches up for the award, but who wins? Let us know in our poll who you think is most deserving.

Game of the Week preview: Dan Bylsma keeps Pittsburgh winning without their biggest stars


When you’re the head coach of a high profile team, there’s a lot of pressure on you to get the best out of your team. This is no exception for Pittsburgh’s Dan Bylsma. When you take away his two best players from the lineup, those expectations aren’t lowered at all. Bylsma having to make due without Sidney Crosby for an undetermined amount of time thanks to a concussion and the rest of the season and playoffs without Evgeni Malkin makes life tremendously more difficult for the Pens bench boss but you wouldn’t know it by looking at the standings or the results since they’ve been out.

The Penguins sit in second place in the Atlantic Division just four points behind Philadelphia for the top spot. That also puts them four points behind the top spot in the Eastern Conference and currently in the fourth seed in the East.  That’s good for home ice in the first round of the playoffs should they stay there and hold off Tampa Bay.

Just how is Dan Bylsma able to keep the Penguins rolling along in spite of injuries to two of the best players in the game? Familiarity. The Pens have had to rely on numerous guys from their AHL affiliate in Wilkes Barre-Scranton from the likes of Mark Letestu to Dustin Jeffrey to Chris Conner. Letestu has seized the opportunity and made himself a valuable contributor. Jeffrey for a stretch this year was the AHL’s leading scorer and with Malkin and Crosby out he’s gotten a chance to show he belongs in the NHL, something which knowing Bylsma from his days in the AHL helps out.

“He brings an enthusiasm to the rink, and something new every day,” Jeffrey said. “When you see a guy who’s genuinely excited to be here every day to teach us, to be on the ice with us, I think it’s contagious. You see with our team the way we play, it’s almost a reflection of the way he carries himself and the way he brings himself to the rink.”

We can recall seeing how Bylsma is with the players from HBO’s 24/7 series and how the young Penguins gravitate towards him and how his mutual respect of all the guys in the room really rubs off on everyone. Bylsma is one of the younger coaches in the NHL and he’s not so far removed from playing in the league. Having a guy like that that can teach and also be a players’ coach is rare to get these days in the league.

Bylsma has also been the watchful eye over the huge seasons that Marc-Andre Fleury and Kris Letang are having at their respective positions. Fleury has been the Penguins best player all season long and while he’s not likely to get much consideration for the Vezina Trophy, he’s been outstanding and virtually flawless all season long. With the Penguins offense unable to generate the goals they normally would without Crosby and Malkin, Fleury has had to be a lot better of late and he’s done so. With a 2.35 goals against average and a .918 save percentage, Fleury’s been incredible this year. After the first month while he was playing shaky in goal, some wondered if perhaps it would be a season-long roller coaster for him. That hasn’t happened and he’s been great.

Letang has only been the Pens leading scorer while Crosby’s been out and he’s doing it from the blue line. With the added responsibility of having to try and lead the defensive corps Letang’s been an offensive spark plug scoring 46 points this season. With eight goals and 38 assists, he’s the guy that’s more often than not getting it together from the blue line. With guys like Paul Martin and Zbynek Michalek surrounding him while Brooks Orpik is out with injury, Letang has shined in that role this season. It’s no coincidence that this is all happening under Bylsma’s tutelage.

It’s scary to think what the Penguins would be able to do with a healthy Crosby and a healthy Malkin this year as the Penguins have been emulating their football team playing a blue collar tough brand of game. They’re not flashy, but they can’t afford to be now. Instead, the Pens are one of the hardest working and physically tough teams to deal with in the league. Considering the role Bylsma played while he was in the NHL as a checking center, it’s no surprise that he’s been able to teach his team that edge. Keeping a team afloat and winning consistently without its best players is a tremendous feat and one that makes the Peguins ever more dangerous come playoff time.