Tag: Ice Edge Holdings


Coyotes chairman Gosbee ‘extremely pleased’ to buy the team


Now that the Phoenix Coyotes are no longer wards of the NHL, it’s time to get to know the group of businessmen who jumped in to save hockey in the desert.

The 10-man group called IceArizona is headed up by team Chairman and Team Governor George Gosbee. He was the guy who helped spearhead the group in rallying together to buy the franchise. Gosbee was thrilled about seeing the purchase finalized.

“We are extremely pleased to have finalized the transaction with the NHL and to take ownership of the Coyotes franchise,” he said.

Joining him are Anthony LeBlanc and Daryl Jones, former members of the Ice Edge Holdings group who attempted to purchase the team two years ago. LeBlanc as well is ecstatic to finally own the Coyotes.

“Our ultimate goal is to bring a Stanley Cup championship to our tremendously resilient, passionate and dedicated fan base here in the Valley. We have a lot of work to do and we can’t wait to get started,” LeBlanc said.

Rounding out the group of 10 are: Avik Dey, Gary J. Drummond, W. David Duckett, W. R. Dutton, Robert Gwin, Scott Saxberg, Craig Stewart, and Richard Walter. You search engine wizards can have fun looking up who they are.

Report: NHL confirms agreement with Gosbee group to buy Coyotes


It wouldn’t be summer until we’ve had a buyer approved for the Phoenix Coyotes.

TSN’s Darren Dreger reports the NHL has confirmed they have an agreement with George Gosbee’s Renaissance Sports & Entertainment group to purchase the ownerless franchise.

Does that mean the now four-year old struggle to sell the formerly bankrupt franchise is at an end? No.

There are still many issues left to be figured out yet including a lease agreement for Jobing.com Arena with the City of Glendale. That part of the arrangement has been the major sticking point for previous buyers including Jerry Reinsdorf, Ice Edge Holdings, and Matthew Hulsizer. Greg Jamison had a deal worked out with the city only to fall short of coming up with the money to purchase the team.

We told you here last night the NHL was sharing an ownership plan with the city on Tuesday and Gosbee’s group will be the ones to likely take part in that. The cost of what it takes to run the arena figures to be a huge issue as the city is strapped for cash and cannot afford to pay out in a big way to do that. If there’s traction there, the sale may actually happen.

Jeremy Roenick wants to help buy the Coyotes

Jeremy Roenick

While the Phoenix Coyotes remain owner-free in the desert, a former Coyotes star might be helping them stay in the desert for the foreseeable future.

According to Lisa Halverstadt of the Arizona Republic, Jeremy Roenick has been approached by prospective Coyotes buyer Greg Jamison to be part of his team to purchase the league-owned franchise. Halverstadt reports that Roenick wants what just about everyone else interested in buying the team has wanted in the past.

Roenick, a Scottsdale resident, said he aims for deal that includes the struggling Westgate City Center, which developers built a decade ago in hopes of drawing crowds with sports, shopping and entertainment.

Nothing is easy with how things have gone with the Coyotes and those that have wanted to buy them.

Jim Balsillie went about it the wrong way trying to sweep them out of the desert like they were the Baltimore Colts of hockey. Jerry Reinsdorf dawdled never got an agreement worked out. Ice Edge Holdings were never able to get something completed, and Matthew Hulsizer was blocked by the Goldwater Institute from completing his purchase agreement.

A team of Jamison and Roenick could be enough to get things worked out if the particulars are right, but Roenick tells the Arizona Republic that there’s no time frame on a deal.

If Roenick can help keep the team in Arizona he’ll be as big of a hero to fans in Glendale and Phoenix as Mario Lemieux was for keeping the Penguins in Pittsburgh by buying them. As we know all too well with the Coyotes, getting it done might take a long time if it ever gets done at all. They may have to work fast, however, as time isn’t on their side to keep the team in the desert.

Former Sharks president Greg Jamison wants to buy the Coyotes and won’t use bonds to do it

Detroit Red Wings v Phoenix Coyotes - Game Four
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You’ve heard of Jerry Reinsdorf. You’ve heard of Ice Edge Holdings. You’ve heard of Matthew Hulsizer. Now it’s time for you to get to know the latest name in the hunt to find an owner for the Phoenix Coyotes. Enter former San Jose Sharks president and CEO Greg Jamison to the discussion.

Jamison’s name was discovered as one of two parties interested in buying the moribund franchise from the NHL by the Phoenix Business Journal. Much like past attempted deals with the City of Glendale and the NHL, Jamison will work out a sales agreement with both parties to earn an exclusive negotiating window to work out a deal. All of the Coyotes’ previous suitors all worked out similar agreements with the city and the league to get things figured out so forgive us if that doesn’t get us too excited about Jamison’s name being pushed to the forefront.

What does give us reason to have a little more hope that things can get completed this time is a particular revelation that will help keep the pesky government watchdog group, the Goldwater Institute, out of the mix when it comes to working out a deal.

The city of Glendale said Friday it would not try to sell bonds to help facilitate a sale of the Phoenix Coyotes to a new owner.

The city issued a statement saying it was talking to two “qualified” ownership groups who want to buy the Coyotes and keep the team in Arizona.

“As indicated in June, the City of Glendale has identified two qualified buyers for the Coyotes team and is looking forward to finalizing documents with qualified buyers. No bonds will be sold by the city as part of these proposed concepts. As always, ongoing negotiations are confidential,” Glendale city spokeswoman Julie Frisoni said in a statement.

Not selling bonds to help get the deal moving would keep Goldwater’s interests in a potential deal out to pasture. As you might recall, Goldwater stepped in on Matthew Hulsizer’s offer to buy the team because the City of Glendale wanted to work out a $100 million bond sale to help give Hulsizer the money he was looking for to complete the deal. Goldwater saw the bond sale as a violation of the State of Arizona’s gift clause and promised litigation if the city went ahead with the sale. Instead of continuing to fight with government and special interest interference, Hulsizer withdrew his offer putting the Coyotes and Glendale back to square one.

If, and this is a big if, Jamison can get an offer together that works for both the NHL and the City of Glendale then perhaps this whole mess can be figured out and then the fans in Arizona can prove to the rest of the NHL that all they needed all along to show they’re serious about hockey was a stable owner. The Coyotes have been playthings for millionaire former owners Steve Ellman and Jerry Moyes who both had their hands in putting the Coyotes in this mess in the first place.

Ellman brokered the deal to get Jobing.com Arena built in Glendale and got the terrible lease the team has with the arena while Moyes, who bought the team from Ellman, tried to sell the Coyotes to BlackBerry guru Jim Balsillie to be rid of the franchise that was costing him tens of millions of dollars in losses per year.

If Jamison can purchase the team entirely with his own money, God bless him for it because that will keep all the watchdogs out of the mix and provided that Jamison doesn’t want to move the team any time in the future, he could be the savior the franchise has been looking for.

That said, we’ve been down this road before with all of the other potential buyers. We’ll find out soon enough whether Jamison is another notch in the belt of failed suitors or if he’s the guy to save hockey in the desert.

Adrian Aucoin: “I’d love to know that there’s going to be hockey in the desert”

Coyotes Sale Hockey
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Ever since May of 2009, there has been a cloud of uncertainty hovering over the Phoenix Coyotes. Since the day Jerry Moyes put the team into bankruptcy and tried to sell the team to Jim Balsillie, the Coyotes have had two of the most impressive seasons in franchise history (yes, we’re still including the Winnipeg Jets seasons). In 2009-10, they surprised the entire NHL by finishing 4th in the Western Conference with 107 points. They followed up their Cinderella season with a 99 point effort (good for 6th in the West) and another trip to the playoffs. For a team that hadn’t made the playoffs since 2002, back-to-back appearances have shown that the team was on the right track.

Unfortunately, fans and those within the organization haven’t been able to enjoy this period of success due to the insecure state of the franchise as a whole. Will they stay? Will they go? Will this owner be the one? These are the questions that have dominated Coyotes headlines across the national landscape much more than “Is Shane Doan the most underrated captain?” or “How good is Dave Tippett?” Until an owner has signed on the dotted line and the Goldwater Institute has given its tacit blessing to any sale, the ownership questions are going to continue to steal the headlines from the actual play on the ice.

Defenseman Adrian Aucoin admitted that doubts off the ice can be concerning—but once the players are on the ice, all of the peripheral issues concerning the sale fade away:

“The luxury we have is as soon as you step on the ice, none of that stuff really matters because we’re there for one reason. It doesn’t matter who owns the team we’re going to be playing as hard as we can.”


“As far as family and everything goes, it would be really nice to get it settled just so knowing that where everything’s situated and especially in my case with young kids. And if I’m hoping to retire in Phoenix I’d love to know that there’s going to be hockey in the desert. That’s a huge factor.”

He’s not the only one who would love to know if there’s going to be hockey in the desert. There hasn’t been any new news surrounding the ownership situation, nor any news of potential owners throwing their hat into the ring. Since Matthew Hulsizer publically pulled his bid at the end of June, there haven’t been many investment groups jumping to fill the void. Jerry Reinsdorf’s name has been pulled off of mothballs, but any interest from that side is minimal at best at this point. All the while, Hulsizer has shown interest in purchasing (at least a portion) of the St. Louis Blues.

Wouldn’t it be a kick in the gut if the guy who tried to buy the team for seven months ended up purchasing another team only few months later?

The good news for the Coyotes and their fans is they are guaranteed at least one more season of hockey. Despite operating on a shoestring budget, only the Canucks, Sharks, and Blackhawks have had a better record in the Western Conference than the Coyotes over the last two seasons. This season they’ll have Norris Trophy candidate Keith Yandle returning for the first year of his new 5-year contract. They’ll get to watch youngsters Martin Hanzal and Oliver Ekman-Larsson this season; and once they get restricted free agents Kyle Turris and Mikkel Boedker under contract, fans will get to watch the two young forwards blossom at the NHL level as well.  An increase in season ticket sales shows that the fans are ready to believe.

Just like any other team in the league, the Coyotes will have a few questions to answer throughout the course of the season if they want to make the playoffs. They’ll have to find a legitimate answer between the pipes to replace Ilya Bryzgalov. They’ll need to replace forwards like Eric Belanger and Vern Fiddler who gave the Coyotes strong depth. They’ll need to find someone to replace Ed Jovanovski’s 20 minutes per game. If they can quickly find answers for all three of these questions, they’ll be well on their way towards yet another playoff berth. After surprising people for two years in a row, it wouldn’t be fair to call it “surprising” anymore.

Whether they are able to succeed or not, we know they’ll be looking for the answers while they’re in Phoenix. Hopefully one day we can just look at the team during the offseason and not have to worry about an ownership dilemma. After all, questions about the team’s play on the ice would be a welcomed change from questions about the team’s ownership in a city council meeting.