Tag: ice conditions

Boston Bruins v Washington Capitals - Game Three

Hot weather presents challenge for Caps’ ice crew


Few arena crews faced a challenge like the Staples Center gang did last night, as they were forced to prepare playoff-caliber ice for the Los Angeles Kings shortly after an overtime NBA game for the Los Angeles Lakers. Yet even with a more manageable gap between Washington Wizards and Washington Capitals contests, Stephen Whyno reports that the heat in DC had the Verizon Center crew on their toes.

“The guys who drive the Zamboni and maintain the ice, they’re looking for it whether it’s January and it’s 30 degrees out or it’s april and it’s 90 degrees out,” arena senior vice president and general manager Dave Touhey said in a phone interview. “But when it’s April and it’s 90 degrees out, that’s an abnormality. When it’s 90 degrees out, you pay more attention to it.”

That means several layers of protection, including turning the temperature down from the usual mid-to-upper-50s down to the lower 50s. While that seems like a small change, it can make a big difference.

“We normally have processes that we go through to maintain the NHL standards. Now we’re taking readings every hour to make sure where we are as opposed to just monitoring it,” Touhey said. “We’re just monitoring it more closely to make sure that we’re down where we want to be.”

The Capitals and Boston Bruins combined for a measly four goals through the first two games of the series – which included an overtime and double overtime contest – so it’s not like the teams could blame choppy ice for shoddy offense. Still, as much as an ice crew can do, don’t be surprised if we’re in for another low-scoring affair.

(Did I just jinx the two goalies?)

Unlike last year, ice conditions don’t have teams worried

John Tortorella

While the 2012 Winter Classic will start a couple hours later at 3 p.m. ET to give the game better conditions to play, there aren’t any concerns over the ice.

Coach John Tortorella made sure that if anyone does complain about the ice, it won’t be traced back to him.

“It wasn’t bad. It wasn’t bad. It’s not going to be  perfect. They have worked very hard at it, and so both teams are going to skate on the  ice.  Both teams did the same thing today with their families. Both teams have gone through the same thing the past month. So let’s just play.”

Yes, sir, let’s do this.

Rangers forward Artem Anisimov also gave the ice a big thumbs up.

“Ice? It’s good ice. It’s hard ice. I like it. It’s going to be a fun game tomorrow.”

Philly’s Maxime Talbot also was feeling good about the ice and considering he played in last year’s Winter Classic, he knows how tough it can get.

“The ice condition has been like pretty good and fun.  It’s a special event and I think everything that surrounds the event is great and we feel privileged to be part of this game.”

Comparing how the ice in Pittsburgh was last year, which was hampered by rain and warm temperatures, this year’s game is shaping up to be just fine.

Despite Tuesday’s struggles, Baltimore hopes to attract an NHL regular season game in future

Nashville Predators v Washington Capitals

After the NHL’s first game back in Baltimore since 1997, Alex Ovechkin’s statement probably summarized the mood: “Thank God nobody got hurt.” The Washington Capitals star wasn’t talking about playing against rugged Nashville Predators such as Shea Weber, though. Instead, both teams seemed genuinely concerned about the downright scary ice conditions at the 49-year old 1st Mariner Arena.

Players and coaches noted muggy conditions in the locker room and felt that the staff just couldn’t get the arena cold enough for a quality hockey game. Which, again, is pretty reasonable since the building has been around since 1962.

While there certainly were attempts to smooth the cracked ice over with a Zamboni’s worth of good intentions, the exhibition was a missed opportunity at best and a near-disaster at worst.

With that in mind, it’s a bit surprising that 1st Mariner Arena’s general manager Frank Remesch hopes to not just score another preseason game for 2012, but perhaps even bring an NHL regular season game to the Baltimore arena in the future, according to The Baltimore Sun.

Remesch said Baltimore held up its end of the bargain by packing 1st Mariner Arena on Tuesday night, but he admitted that the arena “dropped the ball” when it came to delivering quality ice.

“The good news is that it can absolutely be fixed,” he said.


“Hockey is a tough sell in Baltimore,” he said. “The thing about this is that the Capitals have branded themselves. They have arguably the player in hockey [in Alex Ovechkin]. It’s kind of like bringing Bruce Springsteen here. It’s one time. I can’t see this not being a success for the future. After we prove we can do this three, four, five times, I’m going to push for a regular-season game. … It’s a very, very, very, very long shot. But if you’re a fan, don’t give up hope.”

The issues with the quality of ice aside, arena officials would have to convince the NHL to overlook the fact that the rink at 1st Mariner Arena is four feet shorter than the regulation length of 200 feet.

“That could be a hindrance,” Remesch said.

It’s safe to say that having shoddy ice conditions and a non-regulation ice surface go beyond a mere “hindrance” to being a probable deal-breaker (at least for a regular season game). That being said, the Capitals have plenty to gain from expanding the scope of their franchise’s influence, so it would make sense for them to at least be open-minded to return for another preseason game or two.

The 1st Mariner Arena staff might want to take care of their ice conditions before dreaming too big, though.