Tag: Green Men

Canucks Green Men

Vancouver’s Green Men draw Brad Marchand’s ire, sponsored trip to Boston for Games 3 and 4


While the origin of their idea wasn’t very original (it came from “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia”), Vancouver’s Green Men provide plenty of off-the-wall antics. Hockey isn’t always a serious game in the first place, but the body suit-wearing oddballs have a way of adding absurd humor to almost any trip to the penalty box.

Naturally, the 2011 Stanley Cup finals will likely provide the largest platform for the two wacky fans yet, something that’s evident after just one game. (For one thing, they continued their tradition of referencing their opponents’ local celebrities, holding up a cardboard cutout of Beantown’s Ben Affleck in a Canucks jersey in Game 1.)

To the surprise of almost no one, the Green Men’s various antics drew the attention (and ire?) of Boston Bruins pest Brad Marchand, according to Joe Haggerty. Marchand reportedly gave the two fans a squirt from his water bottle during a trip to the box and didn’t deny that they caught his gaze (although he claimed that they didn’t affect him or his teammates).

“I tried to squirt some water in my mouth and might have missed a bit – and it got on [the Green Men],” said Marchand.

That quick exchange was enough for the 23-year-old Bruins winger to drop a few bombs on The Green Men during his meeting with the media on Friday afternoon following a full day of practice.

“They probably paid about ten grand for those seats, so they can do whatever they want,” said Marchand. “They’re not a factor. They’re just trying to seek a little piece of fame. For the most part you just ignore them. You can’t hear what they’re saying. They look like fools anyway.

“I think it’s all dumb. What are they even doing? I’m not really paying any attention to them. I’m not gonna be wearing that suit in public. People have done that forever. I don’t know why they’re anything special. They like to yell through the box. I think they’re a little embarrassed about the way they look, so they’ve got to wear those masks.”

Marchand was reportedly glad to hear the news that the Green Men will make a rather courageous trip to Boston when the series shifts to Massachusetts for Games 3 and 4. The Green Men have traveled to other playoff locales before – most notably to the guffaws of Keith Urban and Nicole Kidman in Nashville – but this time around, they’ll receive sponsorship for their journey.

The pair, also known as Sully (Ryan Sullivan) and Force (Adam Forsythe), announced Friday at the UBC Robson Square skating rink — in what may have been the first press conference ever held by sports fans — that Travelzoo will foot the roughly $3,700 bill for the games in addition to airfare and hotels.

“Travelzoo was the first company that was really cool about it,” said Force of their first official sponsorship deal. “They wanted to make sure we got to Boston.”

The Green Men want fans who think they are selling out to realize up until this point the two have paid for everything on their own, with a few $200 or $300 appearance fees thrown in.

“There’s very little money out of this, all of it’s gone toward tickets so far,” Force said. “We paid $700 for the tickets for round one, so we did a bar mitzvah.”

The Green Men said that they might retire their act if the Canucks win the franchise’s first-ever Stanley Cup, although Force owned up to the possibility that they might “Peter Forsberg and completely flop back on that answer.”

It’s easy to wonder how many tricks the two diehards have left up their sleeves, so “retirement” might be wise after this year. Then again, it just won’t be as thrilling to watch away teams enter the penalty box without their distracting, hysterical presences if they do retire their skin-tight outfits, hand-stands and other routines.

NHL’s crack down on ‘Green Men’ continues odd week for fans celebrating the Canucks

Brendan Morrison, Miikka Kiprusoff, Mason Raymond

The NHL makes some strange decisions here and there, but usually those odd choices are focused on illogical suspension-related verdicts rather than limiting fans.

Every once and a while, the league chooses to play the role of fun-killers, though. It seems like it’s been a rough few days for fans who express their love of the Vancouver Canucks, in particular. First The Canadian Press reported that the NHL forced a Vancouver-area car dealership to remove a “Go Canucks Go” sign for copyright-related reasons. Local radio station Rock 101 was running a promotion in which fans could use a sledgehammer to bash a car with a Chicago Blackhawks or Nashville Predators logo until the league intervened for the similar copyright infringement-related decisions.

Now the league is taking perhaps its boldest step yet by trying to crack down on the infamous “Green Men” who ludicrously heckle opposing team players who end up in the penalty box. (You can read an interview PHT conducted with those two fans in this post from 2010.) If you’ve watched any Canucks games that took place at Rogers Arena in Vancouver in the last couple years, it’s almost inevitable that you would come across those Green Men. After all, it’s pretty hard to miss two guys in full-body neon suits who do hand stands and other attention-grabbing things to try to get under the other team’s skin.

It’s an amusing act, even if it’s not particularly original considering the fact that the tradition began in the television show “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia” and copycats keep cropping up at all sorts of events.

Still, it’s one of those things that underscores the passion (and off-beat sense of humor) of many Canucks fans. While the NHL isn’t kicking them out of their seats altogether, the league asked the two fans (they go by Sully and Force) not to touch the glass or do handstands after a complaint was filed about their antics. Naturally, a Facebook petition quickly cropped up in their defense.

All three of these examples of the league getting borderline litigious strike me as disappointing. Asking the car dealership to take down the sign seems unfair … does this mean that any local business must worry about praising their market’s team during the playoffs? If it was clear that the partisanship was driving the car dealership’s business, that would be one thing, but local businesses rooting for teams is a time-honored tradition. Limiting the radio promotion would have made perfect sense if it weren’t for the fact that the station was reportedly raising money for the Make-A-Wish foundation.

Finally, cracking down on the “Green Men” just seems like petty fun-killing since those fans are just part of the atmosphere. Asking them not to touch the glass is almost reasonable if it weren’t for the fact that many fans pound on the glass during games, but the real ridiculous part is telling them not to do handstands.

The NHL comes off as a bit of a bully in these cases, as it seems like they’re picking on their own bread-and-butter: fans expressing their love for their team in harmless ways. It would be understandable if these measures were taken to reduce violence between fans of opposing teams (like this horrible example from a Los Angeles Dodgers game), but the “Green Men” are only questionable in their taste.

The league is allowed to police its fans and enforce its copyrights as it sees fit, but maybe they should pick their battles a bit more wisely going forward.