Tag: goalie duos

ST. LOUIS, MO - APRIL 14: Brian Elliott #1 of the St. Louis Blues warms up before Game Two of the Western Conference Quarterfinals against the San Jose Sharks during the 2012 NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs at Scottrade Center on April 14, 2012 in St. Louis, Missouri. (Photo by Mark Buckner/NHLI via Getty Images)

Brian Elliott will start for Blues in Game 3


Of all the teams that would lose their starting goalie, the St. Louis Blues seemed the most well-equipped to roll with the punches (with the possible exception of the Vancouver Canucks’ voluntary swap, as we’ll see tonight). Brian Elliott justified such a notion in Game 2 on Saturday, continuing Jaroslav Halak’s shutout bid once the Blues’ more well-compensated netminder went down with a mysterious lower-body injury. The Associated Press reports that Elliott will get the start as the series shifts to San Jose, too, although one can only speculate if that’s matter of performance or Halak’s ill health.

Considering the amazing numbers Elliott put together in his opportunities, Halak’s injury might push Ken Hitchcock & Co. to the best decision to give the team a chance to go deep. While it’s easy to see why Halak’s style seemingly gives him a higher ceiling, Elliott’s positioning and size might actually be a better fit for the Blues’ suffocating system.

That’s especially true against the volume-shooting Sharks, who might just end up having a tougher time against Elliott.

(Honestly, it’s hard to say with certainty, though. Both netminders put up great numbers and each earned two victories against San Jose this season. Feel free to weigh the pros and cons of the two in the comments, much like you surely did in this poll.)

H/T to Rotoworld.

No controversy? Tomas Vokoun will start Monday


For a huge chunk of fantasy hockey fans (oh yeah, and plenty of Washington Capitals hopefuls), Michal Neuvirth’s Saturday start was a cause for concern. To little surprise, Tomas Vokoun wasn’t very happy.

Neuvirth looked good in a 4-3 overtime win yesterday, but it’s likely that Vokoun will still get the majority of the starts. Katie Carrera reports that he’ll make his belated regular season debut with Washington on Monday.

My guess is that Vokoun should still receive at least 55 starts this season. That’s a fine number to keep the veteran netminder healthy for the 2012 playoffs (if they make it, naturally) while also giving Neuvirth enough reps to be reasonably happy. People tend to have tunnel vision for just the next season – and sometimes it’s just about the next few games – but Neuvirth has a chance to be the goalie of the future.

Head coach Bruce Boudreau received a lot of criticism for this decision, but he might be onto something. He’s helping his team both now and later, although it’s possible that the bellicose coach isn’t doing much for his shaky short-term future.

(H/T to Rotoworld.)

Greed could be good for Winnipeg Jets goalies next season

Atlanta Thrashers v Washington Capitals
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When people imply that the Winnipeg Jets are playing with house money this season – or, in other words, that they can have a rough season on the ice but will be spared because of the mere presence in Winnipeg – they’re mostly correct. Of course, those statements cover the team at the box office and in the hearts of fans, but the actual players suiting up during games will face a season-long audition to prove to new GM Kevin Cheveldayoff that they’re a part of the club’s future.

That might be especially true when it comes to their duo of goalies: Ondrej Pavelec and Chris Mason.* They’d be facing enough pressure just by the regime change alone and their own up-and-down moments during the 2010-11 season, but the interesting thing this is that both goalies are in contract years, so next season will determine their future with the Jets and the NHL overall.

Pavelec’s pressure

Pavelec will go into the 2011-12 season as the probable No. 1 goalie, but he might face more pressure since this is his chance to prove that he has the chops to be a top guy. As you may remember, Pavelec’s season started in a scary way with his out-of-nowhere fainting spell. Amazingly, he played his best hockey shortly after that frightening episode, but his play tapered off toward the end of the season to match the Atlanta Thrashers’ own struggles.

Still, he put up a solid .914 save percentage and 2.73 GAA while going 21-23-9, the best individual numbers of his short NHL career. Pavelec definitely showed some potential during last season, but he’ll need to put together a consistently strong 2011-12 season to convince the Jets’ brass to keep him in the fold.

Mason’s place

Mason has been one of the league’s most underrated 1b/backup goalies the last few seasons, but he fell on his face pretty badly in 10-11, sporting ugly individual numbers (.892 save percentage and 3.39 GAA) with a mediocre 13-3-3 record.

The stakes are probably lower for the journeyman goalie who can grow an all-world beard, although another .892 save percentage-type year might convince many that his days of being NHL-relevant are over. It wouldn’t be surprising if Mason finds himself in another uniform next season, because his main goal is simple: secure an NHL job.


For what it’s worth, Mason seems confident that the duo will have a strong season in 2011-12.

Mason, who is in Winnipeg training, says fans can expect goaltending to be a strong point.

“I really think we can be a top-notch talent,” he said after skating with local NHL players at the MTS IcePlex Tuesday. “Pav’s an unbelievable talent, a good young goaltender and a great guy. I really enjoyed playing with him last year and this summer I worked a lot on my strength conditioning and I plan to try to push him.”


“Last year (Pavelec) had a two-month stretch where, in my opinion, he was a top goaltender in the league,” Mason said. “The last half of the season was different for our whole team … we kind of fell off … but he definitely has the potential to be a great goaltender in this league.

“I’ve been around long enough to know that every year you never know what’s going to happen. I’ve played as little as 10-11 games to 60-some games. I just have to work on performing when it’s my turn.”

Ultimately, I think the dangling carrot of a contract year should propel at least one (if not both) goalies to reach their highest potential. When you consider the fact that they’ll be playing in a hockey hotbed like Winnipeg instead of a struggling market like Atlanta, it’s quite possible that the sheer excitement might help carry them on tougher nights as well. (Of course, the heightened pressure might break them down, instead.)

Either way, it’s one of the more interesting goalie duos to watch since the Jets rank as one of the few teams who haven’t determined their mid-to-long-term future in net just yet. We’ll have to see if greed is good for those goalies.

* This is assuming that David Aebischer doesn’t pull off a serious upset by stealing one of the jobs during a training camp tryout, of course.

Taking a look at Tuukka Rask’s unclear future with the Boston Bruins

Boston Bruins v New Jersey Devils

Going into the 2010-11 season, it seemed like the Boston Bruins’ starting job was Tuukka Rask’s to lose. Of course, Tim Thomas started his record-breaking Vezina Trophy-winning campaign with a shutout and really never looked back from there, earning just about every honor (aside from a Hart Trophy) that a goalie can imagine in the process.

In an interesting way, it was the flip side of Rask’s 2009-10 upheaval. The eventual backups weren’t as bad as some believed (Thomas had a respectable .915 save percentage in 09-10 while Rask had a solid .918 mark in 10-11); instead, the No. 1 goalie was just standing on his head.

Of course, in a salary cap world, Thomas and Rask aren’t truly equals even if they’re both very skilled. Thomas’ contract boasts a $5 million annual salary cap hit that won’t run out until after the 2012-13 season while Rask’s contract ($1.25 million cap hit) runs out after this season. There’s also the issue of the two goalies’ ages; Thomas is getting up there in the years at 37 while Rask is entering his prime at 24.

The easiest thing to do would be to keep both of them around, but again, cap constraints and Rask’s urge to be a No. 1 starter – or at least a 1a or 1b goalie – might force the issue. ESPN Boston’s James Murphy addressed Rask’s situation in his mailbag today.

Q: Great coverage this past season, guys — looking forward to watching the B’s defend the title. What do you think about Tuukka? My view is that too much was asked too soon, given Thomas’ injury, and Rask’s struggles in the playoffs stayed in his head this past season. How do you see him getting his legs back underneath him to be the future for this team? Or, do you see him getting traded to make a ‘fresh start’ somewhere else? Thanks! — Joe (Hummelstown, Pa.)

A: Besides Brad Marchand’s contract status this has been one of the most commonly asked questions to me throughout the summer and as I’ve said before, I truly believe Tuukka Rask is still the future between the pipes for the Bruins and he will see more playing time this season. The only trade scenario I see involving Rask would be a knock your socks off type deal that the Bruins couldn’t refuse. Those types of deals usually happen in the offseason, which is essentially over, so I don’t see any chance of that until at least next summer. Thomas was amazing this season, but he is getting older and as you point out, Rask needs game action to stay sharp. I know from talking to Tuukka a lot during the season, his confidence improved drastically towards the end of the season and he didn’t mind riding the pine to get a Stanley Cup ring either. I wouldn’t worry about him just yet.

While losing the starting job had to be disappointing for the Finnish goalie, he played in 29 games in 2010-11, so it’s not like he dealt with the kind of inactivity one might face while backing up a perennial 70+ starts guy like Miikka Kiprusoff. Having a strong backup – particularly one who might have a bright future as a starter – is a rare luxury for an NHL team. Like Murphy said, the Bruins should do their best to keep Rask in the fold, then.

Six teams who made the wrong moves in net during this off-season

Rich Peverly, Steve Mason, Chris Kelly

It’s reasonable to expect NHL teams to make decisions that seem disagreeable from time to time. On occasion, they simply have more information about a given player or situation than the general public. Every now and then, they’re just flat-out wrong even if their hearts and minds are in the right place.

If there’s one area in which teams shouldn’t be given much benefit of the doubt, it’s when they make wild risks with their goalies. The goaltending position can be a very unpredictable one, but smart teams hedge their bets. Here are a few teams who simply dropped the ball this off-season.

Anaheim – Let me start this off by saying that I’m a huge fan of Jonas Hiller. The Swiss-born goalie isn’t underpaid ($4.5 million per year), but he might be underrated. Unfortunately, he’s dealing with vertigo problems that could endanger his career; the unusual malady isn’t exactly something he can “ice” or “walk off” either.

It’s a tough situation for the Ducks, especially since they’re a very budget-conscious team. All of that aside, I still cannot fathom why they wouldn’t try to bring Ray Emery just in case Hiller remains in limbo. Judging by his willingness to accept a meager training camp tryout, Emery probably would have taken a two-way contract, which would have reduced the risk of adding Emery if Hiller ended up fine. Instead, Anaheim might be forced to throw Dan Ellis to the wolves.

source: APToronto – The Maple Leafs are putting a whole lot of eggs in the James Reimer basket, aren’t they? Brian Burke warned Reimer of the dangers of being a one-hit wonder goalie, but all the motivational ploys in the world can’t change the fact that Reimer has only played 37 games in his career. It’s not the worst gamble on this list, but Burke won’t hear the end of it if Reimer falls flat.

Columbus – Read this post for all you need to know about the Blue Jackets’ blind gamble with Steve Mason, who might as well be a cautionary tale for Reimer. Columbus decided to double down on risk when they allowed experienced backup Mathieu Garon to depart via free agency in favor of Mark Dekanich, who has exactly one NHL game on his resume.

Edmonton – Obviously, the Oilers are in a pickle because they cannot get rid of Nikolai Khabibulin’s 35+ contract. Still, the Oilers decided to stand idly by and hope for the best, which means that their starting goalie battle will come down to Khabibulin vs. Devan Dubynk. Even Fox’s Celebrity Boxing matches were less depressing.

source: APFlorida – The Panthers’ situation might be the least acceptable of all because they had the most options. Going into the off-season, it made sense that they would part ways with Tomas Vokoun. Yet when you consider that the Panthers were basically dying to give away money and Vokoun needed a home, was it unreasonable for them to give the statistical darling of a netminder a hefty one-year deal? Maybe he wouldn’t have taken it, but whatever gains they made with their ridiculous free agent spending spree might be lost thanks the enormous talent gap between Vokoun and odds-on starter Jose Theodore.

Phoenix – I think Mike Smith could make a nice career for himself as an above average backup, much like Dan Ellis. The problem is that he’s the Coyotes starting goalie, which means he’ll get little goal support and less defensive help than some might expect (at least if Phoenix’s troubling 2010-11 shots allowed stats weren’t a fluke). Smith probably wouldn’t be in this situation if not for Dave Tippett, so we’ll see if the 2009-10 Jack Adams award winner is as brilliant as he seemed two seasons ago. Logic points to things getting ugly in the desert.

Two teams who could go either way

Islanders (if they trade Evgeni Nabokov) – You can kiss that “dark horse candidate” talk goodbye if the Isles hitch their hopes to Al Montoya and Rick DiPietro. That might be the same if Nabby sticks around, although that situation would be a whole lot more interesting.

Colorado – For some strange reason, I have a weird feeling that the Semyon Varlamov experiment might just work out for the Avalanche. That being said, they overpaid to get both of their goalies so that’s often a recipe for disaster.


Again, goalies can be an unpredictable bunch. It’s possible that one or more of these teams could find a Sergei Bobrovsky-type prospect who comes out of nowhere to save their season. That being said, I think that the Ducks, Blue Jackets, Maple Leafs, Oilers, Coyotes and Panthers will kick themselves for their decisions during this off-season. Where do you come in on these and other teams’ situations in net, though? Let us know in the comments.