Tag: Glendale City Council

Los Angeles Kings v Phoenix Coyotes - Game Two

Glendale City Council to vote on contract to hire arena consultant


According to Mike Sunnucks of the Phoenix Business Journal, the City of Glendale is looking into a new way to figure out what to do about finding a new owner and/or someone to run Jobing.com Arena.

The Glendale City Council will vote whether or not to offer a contract to Beacon Sports Capital Partners LLC worth $25,000 and another $400 an hour for them to advise the city on how to proceed in finding a new owner for the Coyotes. According to city documents the total cost of the contract is worth $100,000.

All told, if that kind of investment can unearth an owner and someone to operate the arena, it’s worth the money. If it fails, it’s just more money the city is throwing down a hole in hopes of keeping the team.

The city was ready to pay former Sharks vice president Greg Jamison $300 million to take over the team and operate the arena, but he failed to buy the team by the January 31 deadline despite working hard to find others to invest in the team. The Coyotes have been without an owner since 2009.

Raising Arizona: Glendale City Council votes to approve Coyotes lease agreement


Is this long saga in the desert at an end? Perhaps it is after the Glendale City Council voted 4-2 in favor of the city’s 20-year, $320 million lease agreement for prospective Phoenix Coyotes buyer Greg Jamison.

The agreement will help the team stay in Jobing.com Arena and hand over duties of managing the facility to Jamison. The one catch here is he’ll have until January 31, 2013 to close on the sale of the team or else the process, with a newly voted in city council, will begin all over again.

Outgoing mayor Elaine Scruggs, who was against the deal, was not pleased at the outcome of the vote saying, “The public will find they were mislead.” She then added, “I choose to support people in other types of uniforms. Police uniforms, fire uniforms…not Coyotes uniforms.”


Is this the end of the story for now? Let’s hope so, but the track record over the last three years says there’s always a twist waiting to be unleashed.

Goldwater Institute asks Glendale City Council to kindly not screw taxpayers over Coyotes

Chicago Blackhawks v Phoenix Coyotes - Game Two

The Glendale City Council will soon be voting on a proposal that will see the city fork out $325 million in all to potential Coyotes owner Greg Jamison. Regional watchdog group, the Goldwater Institute, has been involved in the team’s dealings in the past and they’ve got some concerns this time around as well.

Goldwater Institute president and CEO Darcy Olsen sent a letter to the mayor of Glendale and the city council to address their concerns with the potential deal. To sum it up, they don’t want to see the taxpayers in Glendale end up over a barrel thanks to the deal.

Goldwater’s concerns hover around the possibility this deal can bring into effect the “gift clause” that helped kill Matthew Hulsizer’s bid to buy the team. They’re also asking about the cost parking rights, arena use at Jobing.com Arena, as well as the speed all of this is happening.

Goldwater isn’t alone in their worries, but it’s clear the financial issues the City of Glendale have run into recently are wearing on the minds of more than a few locals.

Glendale city council approves $25 million payment to NHL to keep Coyotes for another year


For the second straight year, the Glendale City Council is picking up the check to keep the Coyotes in town.

After a 5-2 vote, the city council approved to pay up $25 million to the NHL to help cover losses while they league continues to work out a deal with prospective buyer Matthew Hulsizer or anyone else willing to pony up the money needed to buy the team.

The decision by the city council means the Coyotes aren’t going anywhere next season and will play another season in the desert. For the fans in Glendale and around Phoenix, their team is saved for another year. It’ll make for another year in limbo for the team if they cannot get a deal done with Hulsizer. The NHL and Hulsizer continue to try and haggle out a deal with the City of Glendale over bond issues to help subsidize Hulsizer’s purchase of the team but the opposition from the Goldwater Institute over the use of city tax money to make it happen has made it difficult to get anything done.

That fight will get to continue on unless a different means can be worked out that satisfies Goldwater’s problems with the arrangement. Members of the city council who voted to approve the deal slammed Goldwater claiming they were standing up against the deal to prop up their own agenda.

What this means now is that the very patient group from Winnipeg headed up by David Thomson and True North will either have to sweat out the next year in hopes that the Coyotes can’t get a deal done and then perhaps, finally, get to take back the team that once called Winnipeg home.

Their more likely scenario, however, probably points them in the direction of the moribund Atlanta Thrashers. The Thrashers ownership problems and the team’s lack of a following in Atlanta has drawn the attention of the league. While the Atlanta Spirit group continues to struggle to find local investors willing to keep the team in Georgia, a process that’s gone on now for six years, Thomson could get a “booby prize” in being allowed to purchase the Thrashers and take them north.

That much is all speculative for now but commissioner Gary Bettman knows he’s got a very wealthy potential owner waiting in the wings in Thomson. With two teams feeling the bite to get a new owner and failing financially in two big American cities, the pressure might be on to solve the money drain with at least the Thrashers when there’s a prospective owner with deep pockets ready to step in.

For now, fans in Glendale and Arizona can celebrate keeping their team, but another year living on the edge with a team that can’t break the bank to spend for free agents thanks to the league owning them and an ownership situation that’s still unsolved, reliving the same nightmare over and over again may just start to wear the fans out.

City of Glendale could pay $197M over 5 years to keep Phoenix Coyotes


As we mentioned earlier this week, the chances of Matt Hulsizer becoming the new owner of the Phoenix Coyotes is increasingly approaching 100 percent with every new bit of news.

Rebekah Sanders of the Arizona Republic reports that the deal is getting that much closer to fruition, sharing some details regarding the Glendale City Council meeting that took place on Friday. (Beyond the previous bit of information that there would be a vote regarding whether to approve a new lease on Tuesday.)

Sanders reports that the new deal would pay Hulsizer $197 million over the next five years, with $100 million of that money going to him once he buys the team next week. The other $97 million would go to the Coyotes for operating the area arena during non-hockey events, such as concerts, according to Sanders. The city hopes to recoup the money by charging between $5 and $20 for parking (and also selling naming rights for the lots).

Politicians look at the deal in two general ways: as a necessary compromise or a ridiculous concession.

In exchange for the up-front payment, Glendale will take over rights to 5,500 parking spaces in lots surrounding the arena. Use of those lots had previously been controlled by the arena’s tenant, the Coyotes. The city plans to repay the debt by implementing arena-parking fees of $5 to $20 during hockey games, concerts and other events, as well as selling advertising and naming rights on the lots.

Mayor Elaine Scruggs has said the city would suffer if the team left. “What shall we do, lock it up, turn off the lights and then pay the debt on the arena?” she asked this week at a community meeting.

But Councilman Phil Lieberman blasted the deal as “ridiculous” Friday night. He said Glendale cannot afford the terms of the agreement.

A statement issued by Hulsizer’s group said he is “making a strong financial commitment to build a great organization and will work tirelessly to earn the hearts and minds of our fans.”

For more details on the potential deal, click here. It sounds like the Coyotes will stay in Phoenix and continue to play in Glendale … even if it costs the city a great deal.