Tag: game previews

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Your Boston Bruins-Vancouver Canucks 2011 Stanley Cup Finals Game 6 primer

No matter what happens tonight, we’ll have something interesting to talk about. Either the Vancouver Canucks will win their first Stanley Cup in their 40-year franchise history or the Boston Bruins will play in their first Game 7 in their 17 Cup finals runs. Will we see champagne fall on the heads of Canucks players or the pain of a pressure-packed deciding Game 7 on Wednesday?

It seems like it can go either way. The Canucks remain the strong favorites and hold a 3-2 series lead yet the Bruins have dismantled Vancouver by a 12-1 mark at home.

Vancouver @ Boston (NBC) – 8 p.m. ET; Canucks lead series 3-2

From the look of things, there won’t be any major lineup changes, but that can always change in the cat-and-mouse game of the playoffs. Still, to many, it will all come down to Tim Thomas and Zdeno Chara vs. the Sedin twins, Ryan Kesler and Roberto Luongo. Which side will improve their legacies (and chances of winning it all) tonight? We’ll have to watch and see.

Check out all of these posts for PHT’s wall-to-wall coverage for Game 6.

Could Roberto Luongo match Dirk Nowitzki, eliminate two ‘choker’ labels in two nights?

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Vancouver Canucks goalie Roberto Luongo and Dallas Mavericks star Dirk Nowitzki aren’t all that much alike, but they might have almost the same feeling of relief in two consecutive nights.

Luongo is the starting netminder for a juggernaut of a team that is trying to avoid an upset against an underdog Boston Bruins team while few picked Nowitzki’s Mavericks to get beyond the second round of the NBA playoffs. Luongo has been sensational in victory (two shutouts and just two goals allowed in three wins) and terrible in defeat (12 goals allowed in less than two full games) while Nowitzki rarely hit any drastic lows* in a great Dallas run.

Really, the best NHL comparison one could make to Nowitzki would probably be San Jose Sharks center Joe Thornton. They’re both big, blond scorers who received excessive criticism over the years for “choking” and being “soft” despite consistently putting up solid postseason numbers.

That being said, Luongo could join Nowitzki in the “Ex-Chokers Club” with a Stanley Cup victory tonight just about 24 hours after The Big German was able to shake that media-inspired monkey off his back. Despite putting up the kind of numbers that could gain Hall of Fame consideration, both Bobby Lou and Dirk have been scapegoats time and time again, falling victim to the lazy sportswriter habit of finding the first star to blame.

It’s true that Luongo occasionally makes things more difficult for himself, though. One cannot help but wonder why he made those comments about Tim Thomas; what exactly was he trying to accomplish? Either way, Dan Rosen writes that Luongo can shut those critics up with one more win. (It’s pretty tough to badmouth a guy who won a gold medal and Stanley Cup in his career, after all.)

“Even him winning the Olympic gold wasn’t good enough. That’s too bad,” Canucks captain Henrik Sedin said. “People in that dressing room, we know that he’s a winner. He’s done it on every stage before and if it happens (Monday), I hope people can stop criticizing him.”


For now, the talk is all about what he had to say about Thomas and how poorly he played in Boston in Games 3 and 4.

It’s up to Luongo to change the conversation. It’s up to him to shut everyone up.

“If you win the Stanley Cup, no one can say anything about you,” Daniel Sedin said. “That’s what we all want to do and he’s no different than the rest of us. We know he’s going to have a good game for us. Hopefully that will be enough.”

It wouldn’t be shocking if there will be a small segment of the hockey population who would still find a way to bash Luongo even if he won the Cup. Maybe they’ll say he was out-played overall in the series or that he got lucky in the first round in Chicago. Still, it’s a lot tougher to get other people to nod their heads in agreement when everyone can simply look back on all of Luongo’s achievements – both as an individual and as part of a team.

Ultimately, Luongo has two chances (one tonight and one on Wednesday) to echo what Nowitzki did Sunday night: get the last laugh.

* – One could argue that Nowitzki did, indeed, struggle in the Mavericks’ Game 6 win. That being said, he still managed to get 21 points thanks to a strong fourth quarter performance.

Vancouver Canucks bristle at ‘villain’ title

Mark Recchi, Maxim Lapierre

While some outlets have hammered on the storyline a bit more than others, it seems like the consensus is that the Vancouver Canucks are the “bad guys” of the 2011 Stanley Cup finals. (At least for people who enjoy the practice of adopting villains and heroes for sporting events in this age.)

That’s not to say that the Boston Bruins are being fitted for a halo anytime soon. Tim Thomas’ great play generates comparisons to the work of Dominik Hasek and Patrick Roy, but his unfiltered rage also reminded some of the fury of Billy Smith or Ron Hextall. Brad Marchand has the tendency to get under peoples’ skin and the team occasionally earns back its historical nickname of the “Big, Bad Bruins.” (See: their brawl-filled regular season game against the smallish Montreal Canadiens.)

All of that aside, the conventional wisdom is that the Canucks aren’t exactly the darling of unbiased observers. Antics highlighted by Aaron Rome’s hit and Alexandre Burrows bite – not to mention the claims of diving, which may or may not be fair in the grand scheme of things – haven’t made Vancouver an adopted favorite among many fans.

The Canucks seem to bristle at the claims of villainy, as Joe Haggerty explains.

“I don’t think we’re in the villain role. I really don’t,” said Bieksa. “There are a few people that don’t like the way we play, but usually when you win people don’t like that. I know when we played Chicago last year I don’t remember too many people saying anything nice about them – but I’m pretty sure if you asked them they couldn’t care less.

“We don’t feel like villains. We feel like we have all of Canada cheering for us and that’s an entire country. So how can you be a villain when a whole country is cheering for you?”

It might be a stretch to say that all of Canada is rooting for the Canucks – one can assume that fans of division rivals such as the Edmonton Oilers and Calgary Flames might be reluctant to cross that line – but it’s reasonable to think that many Canadians are pulling for them. It’s been 18 years since Patrick Roy and the Montreal Canadiens became the last Canadian-based team to win a Stanley Cup, although the chalice obviously spends plenty of time north of the border either way.

However the rest of the hockey world feels, a Canucks Cup win would make them heroes in Vancouver and the surrounding areas. Something tells me they care a lot more about that designation than any media-fueled “villain” labels.