Tag: front office news

Rich Peverley

Rich Peverley retires from NHL, joins Stars’ front office


Rich Peverley shared some sad (though maybe not surprising) news on Saturday: his NHL playing career is over.

On the bright side, it sounds as though he’s immediately transitioning to a front office job, as he told the Dallas Morning News’ Mike Heika that he’ll work in the player development department.

“It was working out, monitoring how I was doing, continuing to see doctors to exhaust every avenue and find out exactly if I could play,” Peverley said to the DMN. “It’s a case that’s very complicated, and what I have learned is there is no 100 percent to medicine and, unfortunately, I can’t play anymore.”

Peverley fought his way from going undrafted to playing 442 regular season games and 59 postseason contests in his career. He’s likely best remembered for his time with Boston, where he won a Stanley Cup in 2011.

It’s never a happy moment to see a player hang up his skates at what he believes is a premature age (Peverley is 33).

On the other hand, there are probably a few onlookers who are breathing a sigh of relief.

Peverley’s “cardiac incident” was a truly frightening scene, and many were worried about the risks he might be taking if he resumed NHL play. Some of the choice might have been taken out of his hands, as it’s plausible that no GM wanted to roll the dice with his health.

Heika shares more details regarding Peverley’s decision and his role with the Stars organization here.

Tyler Seguin already spoke out about his former teammate:

Blues, John Davidson’s “poker game” heats up

2010 NHL Draft - Round One

Andy Strickland has an interestingly fitting phrase to describe the jostling between the St. Louis Blues and team president John Davidson: it seems like a “poker game.”

Earlier today, reports surfaced that Davidson spoke with another Central Division team, the Columbus Blue Jackets. Eric Smith adds an interesting claim that Davidson actually contacted the Blue Jackets, rather than the other way around. Either way, though, Strickland probably cuts to the crux of the wedge between the Blues and the executive who helped to turn them around.

The Blues are waiting to see if Davidson leaves on his own while on the other hand Davidson is probably questioning if the organization even wants him and his hefty contract to remain with the club. Any way you look at it there’s a very sensitive situation brewing.

In reality this isn’t about the Blues not wanting Davidson. It’s whether or not it makes smart business sense to have both JD and GM Doug Armstrong in place atop the hockey department. If Davidson was making $500,000 a year opposed to the $1.6 Million he made this past season then we probably aren’t having this discussion. The $1.6 Million he earned this year was less than he made in the final year of his previous five-year contract.

With Armstrong and still-new head coach Ken Hitchcock in tow, one might argue that the Blues are ready to move on without Davidson. Ideally, the Blues would probably prefer to keep as many strong hockey minds under the same umbrella as possible, but budgetary constraints and ego concerns can make things complicated.

Lou Korac probably captures the mood if Davidson bolts for the Blue Jackets or somewhere else, though.

No matter what John Davidson decides, ‪the Blues‬ are much better off today than the day he stepped in here. His efforts should be applauded.

Marc Bergevin tapped as next Canadiens GM

2011 NHL Entry Draft - Round One

There seems to be two trendy hiring practices in the NHL. When it comes to coaches, you look at who’s hot in the AHL. If you want to tap the next GM, just look at whoever is sitting next to Chicago Blackhawks GM Stan Bowman.

The Chicago Tribune’s Chris Kuc quotes sources who say that Marc Bergevin (pictured on the left) will go from Bowman’s assistant GM to the new general manager of the Montreal Canadiens.

The Blackhawks’ front office has been picked apart in recent years. The Winnipeg Jets hired former assistant Kevin Cheveldayoff in 2011. Rick Dudley preceded Cheveldayoff when the Jets were the Atlanta Thrashers and most recently served as one of Brian Burke’s many high-profile assistants in Toronto. Dale Tallon set the table for Bowman in Chicago but now he’s building something promising with the Florida Panthers.

Bergevin was an NHL defenseman for 20 years, playing 1,191 regular season games and 80 postseason contests. After that, he moved on to the Blackhawks’ front office, where he bounced around from scouting and assistant coaching positions before working his way up to assistant GM. The 2011-12 campaign was his seventh season in the front office, according to his bio. I hear he’s an “epic prankster” as well, but I’m not sure how relevant that is to his job as GM.

(Oh yeah, he’s also a Montreal native, so speaking French isn’t an issue – if his last name didn’t give it away already.)

So, what are you thoughts? Was this a good hire? Do you think the Blackhawks are getting tired of seeing their front office harvested year after year? Do tell.

UPDATE (9:00 a.m. ET): It’s official, Bergevin is Montreal’s man. Pierre McGuire was the runner-up for the position.

Blackhawks hand GM Stan Bowman a three-year extension

Stan Bowman

Sure, his last name probably helped him get his foot in the door, but Stan Bowman faced a genuine challenge living in his father’s shadow. The Chicago Blackhawks’ GM is making a name of his own, though, as he put the finishing touches on a team that won its first Stanley Cup in decades and hopes to compete in the long-term.

(As an aside, apparently Stan doesn’t have a problem with Scotty Bowman’s presence, considering his father’s role as an adviser.)

After signing core players to mostly-solid contracts, it only seems right that Bowman received a contract extension of his own. The Blackhawks decided to do that today, as they handed the team’s architect a three-year extension that will run through the 2015-16 season.

The 2011-12 season will be Stan Bowman’s third as the GM and 11th with the organization. He inherited some great talent from previous general manager Dale Tallon, but also was forced to navigate some treacherous salary cap waters thanks to his predecessor. The Blackhawks experienced some growing pains last season because of their depth losses, but they managed to keep their core together and head into next season as genuine contenders.

Here are some of his career highlights, via the Blackhawks.

Bowman, 38, is entering his 11th season with the Blackhawks and third as the head of the team’s Hockey Operations Department. He was originally named General Manager on July 14, 2009, before being promoted to Vice President/General Manager on September 7, 2010. Currently the youngest General Manager in the NHL, Bowman helped Chicago capture the 2010 Stanley Cup during his first year as GM, ending a 49-year drought. The Blackhawks have registered a .604 regular-season winning percentage (99-51-17) during his tenure as GM and a 19-10 mark (.655) in three Stanley Cup Playoff appearances over three years.

Over the last 26 months, Bowman has locked up Jonathan Toews, Patrick Kane, Duncan Keith, Patrick Sharp, Brent Seabrook and Corey Crawford to long-term deals and has acquired Nick Leddy, Michael Frolik, Steve Montador, Andrew Brunette and Daniel Carcillo among other moves to stabilize the club’s roster. He also re-signed Head Coach Joel Quenneville through the 2013-14 season last September. Bowman joined the Blackhawks in 2001, serving for four seasons as special assistant to the general manager before being promoted to director of hockey operations, a role he served in for two years (2005-07).

Colorado Avalanche promote Adam Deadmarsh to assistant coach

Joe Sacco

There are plenty of teams who reward former stars (and beloved role players) from former eras with the chance to work their way into the front office. The Carolina Hurricanes already have Ron Francis and Rod Brind’Amour wearing suits for them just a few years removed from their impressive playing days.

The Colorado Avalanche seem like they’re following that trend as well. They attempted to bring in Patrick Roy as their head coach before Joe Sacco (featured in this post’s main photo) eventually got the job. Joe Sakic is already a member of their front office, while they promoted another memorable piece of their glory days today. The team announced that former player Adam Deadmarsh has been promoted to assistant coach. One cannot help but wonder if recently retired defenseman Adam Foote might be next in line.

Deadmarsh spent two seasons as a video/development coach for Colorado, so it’s not like he was rushed to the top ranks on name recognition alone. Perhaps the most stunning thing – something that underscores a career cut short by injuries – is the fact that Deadmarsh is only 36 years old.

Deadmarsh, 36, joined the Avalanche coaching staff in the summer of 2009 and has spent the last two seasons as Colorado’s Video/Development Coach.  The Trail, B.C., native enjoyed a nine-year stint as a player in the NHL, appearing in 567 career games with the Quebec Nordiques/Colorado Avalanche and Los Angeles Kings.  He totaled 184 goals and 373 points with 819 penalty minutes.  Deadmarsh was part of the Avalanche’s first Stanley Cup championship team in 1996.

“Adam certainly deserves this opportunity,” said Avalanche Head Coach Joe Sacco.  “With his background, we feel he will be successful in his new role.”

The team also announced that Tim Army was named the new assistant coach (focusing on video analysis).

Army, 48, has spent the last six seasons as the head coach of his alma mater, Providence College (Hockey East).  Prior to joining the Friars, Army served as head coach of the Portland Pirates of the American Hockey League for three years from 2002-03 to 2004-05.  Army was an assistant coach in the NHL for nine seasons, spending four years with the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim (1993-94 to 1996-97) and five years with the Washington Capitals (1997-98 to 2001-02).

The Providence, R.I., native was drafted by the Colorado Rockies in the ninth round (171st overall) of the 1981 NHL Entry Draft.  He played three seasons at Providence College and then two years of pro hockey before returning to the Friars as an assistant coach in 1988.

“Tim has coached at all levels of hockey,” said Sacco.  “His experience and passion will complete our staff very well.”

One other interesting bit: Steve Konowalchuk – another familiar name to hockey fans from the ’90s – will leave the Avalanche coaching staff to become the head coach for the Seattle Thunderbirds in the WHL. There is no word on whether or not he will receive a Ford Thunderbird for his troubles.