Tag: Fighting Sioux

North Dakota Fighting Sioux

It might be time to say goodbye to the “Fighting Sioux” moniker


The University of North Dakota will be looking for a new nickname for their sports teams.

Voters in North Dakota chose to retire the Fighting Sioux moniker the university’s sports teams have had for year by a 67.35 percent to 32.65 percent margin according to the Grand Forks Herald.

The Fighting Sioux name has come under fire in recent years thanks to the NCAA looking to move away from “hostile and abusive” nicknames and mascots for schools. North Dakota’s men’s hockey team fought hard to keep the name, but the NCAA and member conferences in other sports put the squeeze on the university by threatening to ban the school from playoffs because of the name.

University president Robert Kelley sounds resigned to giving up the name in a statement after the vote.

We are appreciative that voters took the time to listen and to understand the issues and the importance of allowing the University to move forward.  We also understand how deeply this has affected all of us.

Tuesday’s vote allows us to focus our attention on our students as we continue to build exceptional programs in all areas of the University.  We appreciate the support that has been expressed for the University of North Dakota over the past several weeks, and especially for UND Athletics.  It is support that will continue to be important as we build a great future for the University and for UND Athletics.

We will continue to work with the State Board of Higher Education, the North Dakota University System, and the leadership in athletics as we move forward.

The school has fought hard to keep the name and while they’ve been respectful of the Sioux name, it appears change is coming for North Dakota.

(h/t Jennifer Conway on UND statement)

North Dakota saying goodbye to Fighting Sioux nickname

NCAA Fighting Sioux Meeting

There have been discussion, negotiations, and even lawsuits over the last few years revolving around the University of North Dakota and their Fighting Sioux nickname and logo. Finally, there is some action to go along with all of the talk.

The school is now taking significant steps to transition away from the Fighting Sioux nickname/logo—a process that will be “substantially completed” by December 31, 2011. The hockey team will continue to wear the same jerseys until February when the new jerseys are available, but around campus the school will take steps to remove the logo and nickname from just about all visible locations.

According to the University, the school is aiming for “several key values” while they transition the nickname and logo. They say they want to show respect, take care, provide inclusiveness, and show transparency as they make the move away from the Fighting Sioux.

That’s politically correct speak for “we’re going to do it and try really hard to not upset anyone in the process.”

After expunging the Fighting Sioux from the campus, the next step will be to settle on a new nickname for the university. It’s a process that the school isn’t even allowed to start working on until January 2012; and it’s a process that won’t be completed overnight. According to the school, “the law stipulates that neither UND nor the North Dakota State Board of Higher Education may adopt a new nickname or logo before January 2015.” Until then, the school will just be known as the University of North Dakota and will use their interlocking ND logo as their primary logo.

It’s been a long time coming, but the Fighting Sioux nickname is finally on its death bed. For anyone that wants jerseys or memorabilia that will soon be “vintage,” you have a couple of months before their licensed dealers will be prohibited from selling merchandise with the Fighting Sioux logo.

At least the fans will still be able to wear whatever they want to games.

PHT’s Morning Skate: Dan Carcillo used to be an altar boy

Left Wing Dan Carcillo
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PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

You know what they say about those kids who went to parochial school, they either turn out to be hockey bloggers (like yours truly) or hockey tough guys like Dan Carcillo. (CSNChicago.com)

Speaking of Carcillo, he and Patrick Kane are having a mustache battle for Movember. Methinks this won’t bode well for baby face Kane. Call us when the mullet battle goes down. (ESPN Chicago)

Teemu Selanne tore his team a new one after their OT loss to Washington. When Teemu roars, you’d better listen. (OC Register)

Dominik Hasek is 46 years-old and he still wants to keep playing hockey. Who does he think he is, Chris Chelios? (NHL.com)

Mike Fisher has been cleared to play for Nashville after getting rung up by Francois Beauchemin. Resume your duties Nashville paparazzi. (Tennessean)

The Ilya Kovalchuk at right wing experiment lasted less than one game. Maybe they could’ve told him it was like left wing, just in reverse? (Fire & Ice)

Corey Perry is getting his number retired… By his junior team the London Knights. (Ducks)

Nathan Horton says he doesn’t feel like himself. He also says it’s not concussion-related. Hmm… (CSNNE.com)

Evander Kane is playing great in Winnipeg and silencing the critics. Wait, there are critics in Winnipeg? (Winnipeg Sun)

Chris Clark is getting a tryout with the AHL Bruins after missing out with Boston in training camp. (CSNNE.com)

Andy Sutton says it’ll take more than a suspension to change how he plays the game. He would know, he’s an expert in suspensions by now. (Edmonton Journal)

Peter Regin is finally seeing a finish line in his injury recover for Ottawa. Sadly, it’s about six weeks away. (Senators Extra)

College hockey: If you thought the battle over the North Dakota Fighting Sioux nickname was over, you were sorely mistaken and haven’t been paying attention to this saga. (USCHO)

Finally, Lauri Korpikoski proves that you don’t need balance at all to be able to score a goal. (NHL)

North Dakota expected to finally give up the fight, retire Fighting Sioux nickname

North Dakota Fighting Sioux

After a contentious battle, it appears that the University of North Dakota is going to give up their fight to keep the Fighting Sioux nickname.

For years, the school has adopted the Native American name and look to their athletic team logos but now after pressure from the NCAA and a lack of support from one of two Lakota Indian tribes, the school is expected to retire the “Fighting Sioux” name and imagery from being associated with their athletic teams.

The nickname over recent years was found to be “hostile and abusive” towards Native Americans and the NCAA flexed their muscle on UND to get the name changed by threatening sanctions on their athletic teams if they persisted in fighting the change. Banning them from postseason play in sports such as football and hockey were threatened and with the UND hockey program being as big and popular as it is, these threats were taken seriously.

After meetings between NCAA officials and North Dakota representatives including state governor Jack Dalrymple, the NCAA feels confident that their wishes will be met.

“It’s our understanding coming out of this meeting that the Fighting Sioux nickname and logo will be dropped,” said NCAA VP for communications Bob Williams in the article. “The contingent from North Dakota made it clear that they were committed to changing the legislative action that would require retention of the Fighting Sioux nickname and logo. However, our settlement agreement remains in effect and as a result, the University of North Dakota will be subject to the policy effective Aug. 15.”

While the North Dakota legislature tried their best to fight the efforts made by the state board of education and the wishes of the NCAA by passing a law making a change to the nickname only possible through the state government, it’ll take an action by the governor to transfer that power back to the board of education and hope that the legislature approves it to allow the retirement to happen. While there could be more holdups by the government here, it’s clear that the fight to keep a nickname and appearance that the NCAA finds to be abusive has grown tired.

The tricky part of all this is how the school will handle obscuring and covering up the many Fighting Sioux logos throughout Ralph Englestad Arena where the hockey team plays.  When Engelstad gave his money to the university to have the arena built, he demanded that there be as many Sioux logos as possible carved throughout the building knowing full well that one day the NCAA would come calling for the name. That part of the issue is still under discussion as Chuck Haga of the Grand Forks Herald discusses.

Dalrymple said the NCAA leaders also agreed that the transitioning of Ralph Engelstad Arena regarding logos and insignia will be negotiated by Stenehjem and the NCAA.

Williams confirmed that the two side “agreed to have a discussion regarding that timeline,” but he said provisions in the 2007 settlement agreement concerning what must be removed and when “remains in effect.”

Hodgson did not speak with reporters as he left the meeting. In the past he has been adamant about not stripping logos and other Sioux-related items from the privately owned arena.

This issue is just another awkward one when it comes to the entire situation. While UND has never been one to have offensive mascots (hello Washington Redskins) or crowd chants (like the Atlanta Braves) and the Fighting Sioux name was always treated with respect, they never got approval from the Standing Rock Tribe to use the name. Standing Rock and Spirit Lake Tribes were the two Native American tribes the university needed to get approval from to use the Fighting Sioux nickname and while Spirit Lake passed a referendum of their own, Standing Rock refused to vote on it.

As Haga’s piece discussed, some Native American students felt offended by the name and joined in a lawsuit against the school to get them to drop it.

The students named in the lawsuit include Lakota (Sioux) people and members of other tribes in and outside North Dakota, who have said they all suffer discrimination or discomfort because of the nickname.

All allege that the nickname has had “a profoundly negative impact” on their self-image and psychological health, and the long-running and often bitter fight has denied them “an equal educational experience and environment,” according to the complaint filed in U.S. District Court.

With these kinds of complaints as well as the possibility that some athletic conferences would refuse to allow admittance to North Dakota because of the nickname problem, UND’s hand was essentially forced by those opposed to it. Is this the right move to make to respect a group of people or is this political correctness run amok yet again? After all, other universities still have Native American nicknames and aren’t being forced to change them (University of Illinois, Florida State University for example). For the Fighting Sioux and their hockey team, getting a new look and a new name will make the future a strange one.