Tag: Fernando Pisani

Chicago Black Hawks v Edmonton Oilers

Report: Pisani interested in job with Oilers


With the Edmonton Oilers currently searching for assistant coaches, former NHLer Fernando Pisani has voiced his interest in joining the club according to Jim Matheson of the Edmonton Journal.

Edmonton fired assistant coaches Keith Acton and Craig Ramsay last week.

It was believed Todd Nelson would be considered for a role on Todd McLellan’s staff; however, the Pittsburgh Penguins have been granted permission to interview Nelson for their vacancy with the AHL’s Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins.

Jay Woodcroft, who was with McLellan in San Jose, is expected to join the Oilers, but there could still be room for Pisani, if the club is interested.

Pisani served as an assistant coach with the University of Alberta Golden Bears men’s hockey team during the 2014-15 season.

The 38-year-old spent parts of seven seasons with the Oilers during his playing days. Pisani played a significant role in the Oilers reaching the 2006 Stanley Cup Final scoring 14 goals and 18 points in 24 playoff games.

Sean Bergenheim hopes to continue playoff momentum and help Panthers break their slump

Sean Bergenheim

The Florida Panthers made a lot of gambles through trades and free agent signings during the off-season, with Sean Bergenheim’s four-year, $11 million deal ranking among their leaps of faith. While it wasn’t their riskiest investment (that award goes to the 35+ contract they handed to Ed Jovanovski), the hope rests squarely on a small sample of playoff games representing a “breakthrough” rather than a series of lucky breaks.

When it comes to out-of-nowhere goal scorers, one of the best ways to tell if someone’s production is a fluke is to look at his shooting percentage. It’s not a fool-proof mode of assessment, but sometimes players get an unsustainable amount of “puck luck” that should leave general managers weary.

One can blame at least some of Bergenheim’s great run with the Tampa Bay Lightning on luck. As opposed to his career 7.7 shooting percentage (which was his exact rate during the 2010-11 regular season), Bergenheim connected on 19.6 percent of his attempts in the 2011 playoffs. After scoring just 14 goals in 80 regular season games at his typical rate, Bergenheim scored nine goals in 16 playoff games – a run that included the only tally in Tampa Bay’s decisive Game 7 win against the Pittsburgh Penguins.

If you look at his larger body of work, his typical expected scoring rate is 10-15 goals. Yet while he has serious one-hit wonder potential (or as I like to call it, “Pisani potential”), there is the outside chance that Bergenheim could build on that breakthrough and become a consistent goal-scoring threat for his new team, the Florida Panthers. That’s certainly what he hopes to achieve starting next season.

“We obviously had a great run there last year, and I was very happy with the way I played in the playoffs,’’ Bergenheim said after Saturday’s opening practice of training camp. “I want to bring that here. I learned a lot last year, and my goal is to play at that level the whole season. In the playoffs, I really found my game — I had it there before — and that’s the challenge this year. I have to play that way all year.’’

Considering all the changes that have taken place in Florida, he should have a great chance to earn a prominent role with the team and receive opportunities to make good on his postseason run. It’ll be interesting to see if he can prove that his playoff output wasn’t a fluke.


In other Panthers news, the team hasn’t decided which player should serve as their new captain next season. It makes sense that the franchise might want to drag their feet a bit with that choice considering the changing identity of the roster.

Coach Kevin Dineen said no decision has been made on who will be the Panthers’ new captain. “We’re still a ways away on that one,’’ he said. Center Stephen Weiss and defenseman Ed Jovanovski are considered the favorites.

“You look at [Weiss] as always having a leadership role for his tenure here and the way he plays the game,’’ Dineen said, talking about Weiss working out with rookie Jonathan Huberdeau on Saturday. “Matching him up with one of our future star players is a good mix.’’

Jovanovski might be a hit with fans who fondly remember his first run with the team, but I’d recommend going with Weiss, who’s been with the club through thin and really thin. Ultimately, the most important leader might be new head coach Dineen, who must find a way to take a roster that seems like an unshaped mass of clay and sculpt them into a playoff contender.

Getting Bergenheim to match his playoff pace certainly wouldn’t hurt the cause.

Fernando Pisani should embrace reality and accept a training camp tryout

Chicago Blackhawks v Vancouver Canucks

Confidence is a funny thing. While just about any hockey player probably grapples with fears and doubts from time to time, some combination of luck, courage, talent, hard work and confidence propelled them to the NHL level. Yet as pride and confidence might help a previously obscure player gain his 15 minutes of fame, those same thought processes can also be his undoing during times of uncertain employment. (Especially when good old-fashioned greed enters the picture.)

In most peoples’ eyes, five years isn’t a long time. The reality of professional sports, however, is a lot can change in five years. Just look at the career of Jonathan Cheechoo; he scored a league-leading 56 goals in the 2005-06 season but now finds himself mired in minor league irrelevance.

Such a predicament shouldn’t be lost on one-hit wonder Fernando Pisani. The marginal winger scored 14 goals and 18 points in 24 games during the 2006 playoffs for the Edmonton Oilers, becoming something of a folk hero in the process. That outburst ended up being a mirage, as he turned in rapidly decreasing numbers* with the Oilers after signing a four-year, $10 million on the heels of that outlier of a postseason run. That contract finally expired last summer, so the Chicago Blackhawks signed him for one year at the league minimum. They got what they paid for, too, as Pisani generated just 16 points in 60 regular season games and zero in three postseason contests.

Considering how far his career has fallen, you’d think Pisani would take what he can get. The 34 year old forward told Jim Matheson of the Edmonton Journal that he’s not interested in a training camp tryout or a sojourn in one of the European leagues, though.

“Going to camp (without a contract) isn’t a situation I want to be in. I’ll hang tough and see what happens in the next couple of weeks or so,” said Pisani, who has had his nose pressed up against the NHL glass for months, but nobody will let him in, or sign him.

“You never know what’ll happen in the summer. Early on, there were a lot of trades and action, but there hasn’t been much activity the last two or three weeks,” he said.


When asked if he might consider Europe, Pisani said: “No door is really closed.”

It’s perfectly fine that Pisani wants to handle this situation on his own terms, I’m just not sure he’s taking the right course of action. While he showed a willingness to kill penalties last season for Chicago (1:25 shorthanded minutes per game), Second City Hockey points out that he wasn’t a very effective penalty killer. He’s also been hounded by injuries, missing 155 regular season games since his magical playoff run in 2006.

If his last few seasons are an accurate portrayal of what he brings to the table, then Pisani is an aging winger with little upside and isn’t a particularly strong defensive player. My guess would be that his best chance to stick with an NHL team would be to change some minds in training camp – or better yet, have a hot string of preseason games – but the former Oilers forward looks primed to opt to hope for a break or two.

Then again, he got really lucky during one summer just five years ago, so maybe the bounces will go his way one more time.

* – Since signing that contract, Pisani scored 28 points in 2006-07, 22 in 07-08, 15 in 08-09 and 8 in 09-10 before departing for Chicago.

Video: Sean Bergenheim’s hot run makes him the latest unexpected playoff hero

Sean Bergenheim

For the most part, the playoffs follow expected scripts. Great players like Wayne Gretzky, Bobby Orr, Mario Lemieux and Maurice Richard cemented their legacies in the summer. And sure, there are a few players who have (fairly or unfairly) been branded as disappointments when their star power seemingly fades in the postseason.

But when you get to this time of year, teams are often propelled by the out-of-left-field work of little-known players. Sometimes it just happens for one precious playoff run, but that’s often all it takes to make a lasting impression upon hockey fans.

Tampa Bay Lightning forward Sean Bergenheim is the latest forward to go from blank looks to fan favorite, as he currently leads the 2011 playoffs with eight goals. As Jeremy Roenick notes, Bergenheim is getting to the net and also shooting with confidence. He has the most shots of any Lightning player, with 37 in 12 games, so you cannot downplay his streak to luck alone.

Bergenheim passed fellow “plumber” turned star Joel Ward, who scored seven goals and 12 points in 12 games for the Nashville Predators. As the video at the bottom of this post illustrates, Bergenheim joins an interesting group of players who seemingly came out of nowhere to help their teams. Here’s a quick list Versus put together, in chronological order:

Chris Kontos, Los Angeles Kings – 1989

Kontos enamored Kings fans so deeply that one fellow decided to use his name as his blogger pseudonym. Kontos never scored more than nine goals in any career regular season, yet put up nine in 11 playoff games for the Kings that year.

John Druce, Washington Capitals – 1990

When people think of unexpected playoff scorers, Druce is one of the first players people point to. That’s with good reason, as he scored an impressive 14 goals in 15 games.

Ruslan Fedotenko, Tampa Bay Lightning – 2004

Fedotenko just seems to play better in playoff games, but that point was most illustrated in the Lightning Cup run. He scored 12 goals in 24 playoff games, including eight in his last 11. He also scored the Cup-winning goal in Game 7. Fedotenko went on to win a Cup with the Pittsburgh Penguins, too.

(Note: one other name I’d like to mention is Fernando Pisani. He scored 14 goals and produced 18 points overall in 24 games with the Edmonton Oilers in 2006, helping the team get within one win of a Stanley Cup that year.)

Anyway, enjoy the video. It’s OK to feel nostalgic for the days of Druce and Kontos, by the way.

This video is no longer available. Click here to watch more NBC Sports videos!

With Tomas Kopecky out, Fernando Pisani hopes to start another magical playoff run

Dallas Stars v Chicago Blackhawks

Much like other professional team sports leagues, the NHL has its fair share of players who had out-of-nowhere playoff runs. In a way, these players are the one-hit wonders of the hockey world, with obscure characters such as Chris Kontos captivating audiences like metaphorical shooting stars.

Chicago Blackhawks forward Fernando Pisani falls under that category, at least going into tonight’s Game 2 against the Vancouver Canucks. If it weren’t for his magical 2006 postseason run with the Edmonton Oilers, he would just be known for having ulcerative colitis.

Yet there’s no denying how fantastic that 24-game span really was for Pisani. The career .37 point per game player notched 14 goals and four assists for 18 points, connecting on a stunning 28.6 percent of his shots while producing five game-winning goals.*

Pisani hasn’t come close to duplicating those results, although one must note that he hasn’t played in a playoff game since the Oilers’ Game 7 Stanley Cup finals loss to the Carolina Hurricanes. He’ll get his chance tonight, though, as Tomas Kopecky will be sidelined with an upper-body injury. He’s expected to skate alongside Ryan Johnson and Viktor Stalberg in Game 2.

Could Pisani be the unexpected answer to Chicago’s depth problems? It’s unlikely, but then again, so was that red-hot run in 2006 …

* – Yes, that’s more than a series’ worth of GWGs.