Tag: fan protest

lockout fan protest

Yup, there are fans protesting the lockout in New York City


With fans on the verge of dealing with the third NHL lockout since 1994, some are just about fed up. Case in point, the group of fans outside the NHL Store in Manhattan located near the league’s headquarters.

CSNPhilly.com’s Tim Panaccio snapped a couple pictures of Rangers and Devils fans living harmoniously together on the streets of New York united against the league shutting its doors once again. One fan in particular isn’t too pleased with NHL commissioner Gary Bettman’s record when it comes to labor unrest.

While the protest was small in number of those participating, it shows that some fans are tired of going through this routine every few years. This likely won’t be the last time we hear of something like this going down.

If anything it reaffirms what Bettman said weeks ago about the game being able to bounce back after the 2004-05 lockout because, “we have the greatest fans in the world.” When fans stop voicing their displeasure, that’s when the league has to start worrying.

Blue Jackets fans are going to protest and demand firings

Nashville Predators v Columbus Blue Jackets

You knew it had to happen eventually.

With how bad the Blue Jackets have been this season and the lack of forward progress they’ve seen in spite of firing former coach Scott Arniel, some Columbus fans have just about had it. Columbus Dispatch columnist Michael Arace finds out that some Blue Jackets fans are going to protest the team to try and make change happen.

On Saturday, as the NHL stands down for the All-Star break, some Jackets fans are planning to gather in front of Nationwide to demand the ouster of team president Mike Priest and general manager Scott Howson. The summons first went out on the web on Monday night — right after the Jackets staggered through a 4-1 loss at Nashville.

We’ve seen protests in Montreal against the hiring of Randy Cunneyworth but protesting a team for failing to get things right in a city desperate to root for a winner seems like a nobler effort. In Columbus where the team has made the playoffs once in team history and the team is perpetually losing money, wanting to see the people in charge ousted makes a world of sense.

The other side of this, however, is whether or not the fans can help make the message crystal clear that they demand better.