Tag: fan attack


Fan attacked by Rypien not happy with suspension, gets call from Gary Bettman

While we’ve heard from just about everyone concerning the six-game suspension handed out to Canucks forward Rick Rypien, the person we’ve yet to hear from about it is the fan he went after. 28 year-old James Engquist is his name, and while you may not have heard from him already, he’s been talking about potentially pressing legal action in the matter against Rick Rypien.

As frivolous as you might find that to be, he’s speaking out again today in the wake of the action taken against Rypien and he’s not exactly pleased with the league’s decision as Michael Russo of the Star Tribune finds out.

“In a real-world situation, at my job, at your job as a columnist, if you were do what that person did in your job place, I think minimally what would happen – minimally – you would be fired from your newspaper, your beat writing job. And this is Mr. Rypien’s career, this is his job, he’s being paid to represent the NHL, and they feel to take a two-week break off without pay and come back to work is satisfactory. But as far as the real world goes, that person would be held accountable as far as the law and just as a company in general, that person would probably be fired.”

That’s right, Engquist would like Rick Rypien to be fired. Are we sure there’s no one in public relations in Minneapolis or St. Paul that would like to do some pro bono work, because if anyone needs it right now it’s James Engquist. At least Engquist is getting some of his concerns addressed now.

When he complained that he hadn’t heard anything from the Wild or the NHL or the Canucks about what happened the other night, he’s heard from someone now. NHL commissioner Gary Bettman reached out to him personally to try and calm the waters that divide them.

“He said, ‘Sorry about the events, and players should never ever put their hands on a fan.’ He said he’d like to offer me tickets to a game and dinner, and I thought that was very nice of him. I mean, what do you say at that point. You’re talking to the Commissioner of the NHL. I thought it was really respectful for him to give me a call. He’s a very classy man.”

Game and dinner with the commissioner, all jokes aside here, is a pretty sweet deal. Not everyone gets to meet with the head of the league and take in a game with the guy. As for the jokes, you have to wonder who’s getting punished more severely here, Rypien or Engquist. Come on, we can’t resist a cheap dig.

As for how his life has been since coming out against Rypien and for becoming a shining example for tort reform in legal circles, Engquist says that harassment from people not wearing an NHL uniform is at an all-time high.

“I’m getting phone calls from Canadian radio stations, even at work,” he said. “Basically even going out in public. I’ve gotten a lot of hate emails. I’m definitely saving all of them for records purposes.”

He has to understand that the amount of attention he’s getting from this is partially his own doing. He didn’t need to talk to anyone about what happened and he certainly didn’t need to make his possible intentions of taking people to court public either. Wagging his finger at his harassers now will only continue to make life difficult for him. We’re not pro-harassment here because, let’s face it, he was brought into the public eye forcibly, but we might suggest a public relations class for Mr. Engquist once it’s all said and done.

Rick Rypien suspended six games for assaulting fan; Canucks fined $25,000


Judgment day arrived for Canucks forward Rick Rypien and the sentence for going after a fan during a game in Minnesota this week is stiff as he is suspended for six games. As part of the suspension, the NHL fined the Vancouver Canucks $25,000 as well. The game Rypien missed against Chicago the other night counts towards his suspension and he’ll be able to return to action on November 6th against Detroit.

It’s safe to say here that we were assuming the punishment would be a bit more severe considering how ugly this whole thing played out, garnering national attention for a league where getting major exposure is still an issue. Having folks who aren’t major fans of the NHL thinking that this might be “typical” of the NHL isn’t quite the impression I’d be eager for them to have.

NHL commissioner Gary Bettman issued this statement about Rypien and his suspension:

“Prior to each season, all clubs and players are advised that under no circumstances are club personnel permitted to have physical contact with fans, or enter, or attempt to enter the stands,” Commissioner Gary Bettman said. “We hold NHL players to a high standard, and there simply is no excuse for conduct of this nature. Fortunately, this incident is not typical of the way NHL players conduct themselves and is not typical of the way Mr. Rypien had conducted himself during his career.”

Reading between the lines of what Commissioner Bettman is saying here is that since Rick Rypien doesn’t have a history of being a reckless twit on the ice, that means he gets to skate by on a mere six-game suspension. Overall, this is a very ugly public relations nightmare for the NHL. The last time we had one of those, it involved Sean Avery gathering the media to slander his old girlfriend. Avery got a six-game suspension for that as well, not to mention counseling.

Does this now mean that the standard is set at six games if you completely embarrass the NHL? Apparently so, because telling fans that they don’t really have a vested interest in making sure that when they buy a ticket they won’t run the risk of being assailed by the players doesn’t seem to stand out to the league. I’m not looking to make Rick Rypien into everything that’s wrong with the NHL here, but the league pooh-poohing this with a relative slap on the wrist seems foolish.

Lots of folks want to give him a break because the fan he went after decided to go on his own self-destructive, public-support-killing PR campaign but that completely misses the point of what the issue is. The issue here is telling the fans that when they buy a ticket to a game that as long as they stay within the rules of the arena that they’ll be safe and they don’t need to worry about having an adrenaline-jacked up player coming after them in their seat.

The league isn’t condoning what Rypien did, but they’re sure not hammering the point home in saying they’re disgusted by it either. Like it or not, the NHL has now made it so that grabbing a fan in the stands counts as much as hurling insults on camera and for the league, that might be the worst PR out of all this.

Fan grabbed by Vancouver’s Rick Rypien speaks, instantly loses everyone’s support

Rick Rypien

You all knew this would be coming eventually, but the Minnesota Wild fan who was grabbed by Vancouver Canucks forward Rick Rypien last night has spoken out about being the focus of the irate player’s attention. If you missed it from last night, Rypien went into the stands to grab a fan who was mock applauding him as he headed to the locker room during the second period of Vancouver’s 6-2 loss to the Wild in Minnesota.

Today, Wild beat reporter Michael Russo was able to get a hold of the fan, 28 year-old James Engquist, to ask him about what happened last night and what, if anything, they plan to do legally-speaking. Suffice to say, a lot of fans are not going to enjoy Engquist’s line of reasoning on matters.

“This is a crazy incident. I’ve seen a lot of hockey in my day, and I’ve never seen someone actually come into the stands and assault a fan,” said Engquist.

Engquist said he is “definitely seeking legal representation. … I was assaulted, that’s just the bottom line.”

Engquist said he didn’t receive an apology from the league, Rypien or the Canucks. He said he hasn’t heard anything from the Wild.

Now, I don’t want to say that Engquist doesn’t have a case to be made here, he does. Opting to pursue it, however, comes off really ugly for the regular fan that saw what went down. By the book “assault” is the correct term, by what you see on camera, however, and by the view of the court of public opinion the fan had his jersey grabbed while team officials grabbed Rypien and Engquist’s brother pulled him back from the fracas.

Filing a law suit on the matter, however, swings the opinion from being strongly against Rypien for crossing the boundary between players and fans to being against Engquist for seemingly ridiculous litigation. Engquist and his brother were moved to different seats along the glass after the incident occurred, giving them a slight upgrade on their seats behind the Canucks bench. Looking to cash in on what was ultimately a scary matter smacks of greed.

All of a sudden, Rick Rypien doesn’t look like the only one behaving badly here. The Wild and Canucks could both help to step in a diffuse the situation by playing the game a bit nicer PR-wise with Engquist and bend over a little backwards for the guy, but ultimately, Engquist going the route of filing a law suit reflects very poorly upon him.

Unfortunately for everyone, this matter isn’t over yet. Rypien is scheduled to meet with NHL officials in New York City on Friday to discuss what his punishment will be. I’m sure the talk of a lawsuit against him and the NHL will be brought up and factored into what his actions have done for everyone involved. Bad PR, in this case, is bad PR for everyone.

Poll: What should Rick Rypien’s punishment be?


We’ve already talked a lot about what happened last night in Minnesota between Canucks forward Rick Rypien and a fan in the stands and we’ve even given our thoughts on just what we think Rypien’s discipline will be but now it’s your turn. What do you believe Rick Rypien’s punishment from the NHL will be? Let us know in our poll.

Rick Rypien’s fan attack: What they’re saying and what’s next for him

Rick Rypien, Don Henderson

In case you missed it, Vancouver Canucks forward Rick Rypien went off the deep end last night against the Minnesota Wild, attacking a fan in the stands. After being assessed a ten-minute misconduct after a light tussle with Wild forward Brad Staubitz late in the second period, Rypien headed back to the Canucks locker room. On the way there, Rypien was seen reaching into the stands to grab a Wild fan who, on video, appeared to be mock applauding the Canucks enforcer. After the game, Canucks forward Manny Malhotra had a few words in support of Rypien. Get out your incredulity, you’re going to need it.

Rypien was not available for comment after the game, but Malhotra thought the fan “got a little bit too involved.”

“There’s boundaries that should never be crossed. We’re in our area of work,” he said. “We’re all for the hooting and hollering and supporting your team and saying whatever is tasteful. But as soon as you cross that line and want to become physical with a player then we have to make sure we take care of ourselves. … We have no idea of what their intentions are.”

We’ll point you in the direction of the video once again on YouTube for your viewing pleasure. Of course, we don’t know what’s being said by the fan, but from this video it appears that Manny Malhotra may have missed a couple of things along the way. That or Rick Rypien tells one hell of a good story in the locker room.

That said, it frankly doesn’t matter what the fan was saying to Rypien at all. The fan could’ve been one of those stereotypical drunken louts that cooks enough up enough foul language to make your stomach turn. Rypien has to know, just like every other professional athlete on the planet has to know, that going into the stands to confront a fan is absolutely forbidden and will be met with stiff punishment.

Making things a bit more awkward here is the fan in question here appears to be a bit young and not quite of the age to be a drunken lout. Maybe getting loaded on soda causes new, funky reactions in people. Regardless, confronting someone who might be a teenager makes this incident about a 1,000 times worse.For what it’s worth, the fans were relocated from their seats near the Canucks bench to seats along the glass near by the Wild bench. It was definitely a good move by the arena staff to do that.

As for Canucks management, GM Mike Gillis had little to say about things.

“We’ll wait and see how the league views it,” Vancouver general manager Mike Gillis said. “I’m sure there will be a hearing of some sort.”

You better believe there will be a hearing. The Canucks next game is tonight against the Chicago Blackhawks and with punishment headed Rypien’s way, justice will be swift in arriving. What kind of justice awaits him will be fascinating to see.

This incident is ugly from any angle, but especially for NHL public relations. The league already (wrongly) gets labeled as a wanton league for allowing fights, meanwhile this whole escapade takes place because linesmen stepped in between Rypien and Staubitz to prevent them from throwing punches for the second time in the game.

Even stranger still is that Rypien wasn’t thrown out of the game for interacting with the fan. Believe it or not, there is a rule on the books that confronting a fan during play earns you an instant game misconduct. You’ll have to forgive the officials for not knowing that one right away since it so very rarely happens. Rypien did return to the bench after serving his ten-minute penalty but didn’t skate another shift before later leaving the bench and returning to the locker room in the third period.

What sort of punishment can Rypien expect to get? Expect it to be severe. There’s no real comparison here for this sort of thing under the latest regime of the NHL. Things are different since the lockout in 2004-2005 and the PR consciousness of the league is at an all-time high. Players being idiots to each other on the ice often sees wildly inconsistent punishment, but players being idiots towards the fans or media is something else entirely.

Sean Avery received ultimately a six-game suspension for assembling the media together in Calgary to insult his ex-girlfriend and get under the skin of his opponent that night, Dion Phaneuf. Think about that, six games for verbally attacking someone who doesn’t play the game just to get an opponent off his game.  If anything, the minimum Rick Rypien can expect to get is six games. Going after a paying customer for seemingly no reason at all other than being a fan the punishment will be harsh and most likely double-digit games.

I know that trying to pick the brain of Colin Campbell, and maybe even Gary Bettman in this case, is a fool’s game but this kind of thing looks bad on everyone involved. It looks bad on Rypien, it looks bad on the Canucks, and it looks bad on the NHL in general. If you want to know how serious some leagues take getting rough with the fans, look no further than the NBA with how they handled the all-out brawl that went down between players and fans in a Detroit Pistons-Indiana Pacers game back in November 2004. The instigator of the melee, Ron Artest, was suspended for the remainder of the regular season and the playoffs, good for an 86-game suspension when it was all said and done.

While the fans in Detroit did their part to help spur that situation on, Artest and other players had zero right to fight them and start a virtual riot. This incident isn’t even remotely on par with that fiasco, but expect that NHL commissioner Gary Bettman will take an equally large stand in making his league appear to be serious about taking care of the fans. If I had to guess what Rypien will see punishment-wise from all this when it’s said and done, and remember guessing numbers for suspensions is madness, I’d wager that around 15 games sends enough of a message to get the job done.