Tag: entry-level contract year deadline

Vancouver Canucks v Anaheim Ducks

Should he stay or go?: Anaheim Ducks defenseman Cam Fowler

As six NHL rookies near the nine game cut-off point from “burning” a year off their entry-level contracts, we’ll discuss the pros and cons of keeping each one at the NHL level vs. moving them down to the AHL. Sometimes the decision will already be made and we’ll just be sharing our two cents while in other instances the moves will come down to a near-coin toss. Either way, we hope you’re entertained and would love to hear your thoughts.

Finally: Anaheim Ducks defenseman Cam Fowler.

The Basics

  • Fowler was projected to be a top-three draft pick but slid all the way down to the defense-poor Anaheim Ducks at No. 12 in the 2010 NHL Entry Draft.
  • He’s listed at 6’1″ and 190 lbs. He also was born in 1991. (Guess it’s time to feel old now.)
  • His next game should have been that magic ninth game, but a broken nose limited him to only six appearances so far.
  • Stats: one goal, two assists for three points and a -1 rating in six games played.
  • His junior rights belong to the Windsor Spitfires of the OHL.
  • Anaheim has already declared that Fowler will stay with the Ducks this year.

Useless facts and thoughts

For a shameless pun maker such as myself, having a guy named Cam Fowler on the Ducks fills me with “David Duchovny in a sorority house” type temptation. Is it a bit of serendipitous luck or is it a curse? Perhaps that beauty is simply in the eye of the pun-holder.

What’s been said about him

Fowler has impressed Ducks head coach Randy Carlyle, as you can see from a quote in this story.

“You have to shake your head at times to remember that he is only 18,” Anaheim coach Randy Carlyle said. “That’s what separates him from players in his age group. He is able to do things at a very high level. His compete level is right up there, his execution level is very, very high. You don’t recognize him as an 18-year-old at all.”

James’s take:

This is a tough call.

For one thing, he’s getting real experience with the Ducks. In six games played, he’s already averaging an impressive 20 minutes of ice time per game and even produces on the offensive defenseman level of .50 points per game. Of course, that’s an incredibly small sample, but he seems like a poised player with a beyond-his-years-IQ. Let’s not forget that the Ducks aren’t exactly overflowing with defensive talent, either.

Yet the repugnant stench of defeat hangs over Anaheim like a thrice-worn jockstrap. This team doesn’t look like a legitimate contender, at least from what I’ve seen, so why burn one of Fowler’s bargain entry-level years on a lost cause? Let’s also not forget these two factors:

1. The Ducks are extremely cheap, generally speaking.

2. He will be a restricted free agent during the same summer that Ryan Getzlaf and Corey Perry will hit the unrestricted free agent market if they keep him in the NHL this season.

By shipping Fowler down to the minors, the budget-conscious Ducks can protect their prize prospect’s psyche while also staggering the team’s toughest contract negotiations. (The team would spread out the negotiations as such: Perry-Getzlaf in 2013, Fowler in 14 or 15, Jonas Hiller in 14 and Bobby Ryan in 15.)

James’s Verdict: Send him down to the minors/juniors.

Joe’s Take:

Fowler has played like he’s been in the NHL all along so far in his rookie season. He’s had to deal with getting over an injury after taking a tough hit and that’s slowed down the decision making process on Anaheim. The Ducks’ defense is an unmitigated mess right now and Fowler has been one of their better players and getting big minutes to go along with that. The Ducks are opting to keep him on the roster for the long run this season and there’s nothing about Fowler’s game that says this is a bad decision. Yes, he’s young. Yes, he’ll make mistakes on occasion, but having him learn on the job in the NHL is what will benefit him the most. Another season in Windsor would have him spinning his wheels against guys he’s a lot better than.

Joe’s Verdict: He should stay, and he will stay.

Ducks GM Bob Murray says the team won’t send Cam Fowler to the minors

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We might still weigh in on this debate since it’s one of the most interesting situations regarding rookies facing the nine-game deadline for “burning” a year from an entry-level contract, but Anaheim Ducks GM Bob Murray said that the team will keep defenseman Cam Fowler at the NHL level.

The nine-game deadline was supposed to come up a few days ago, but a broken nose halted Fowler at six games played. Any drama that might have lingered is gone now, though, as the team will keep him and let one of his bargain contract years burn away.

General manager Bob Murray said Tuesday the Ducks will stick with Fowler beyond the nine-game deadline for returning him to the OHL’s Windsor Spitfires.

Anaheim has been impressed by the 12th overall pick in last June’s draft. Fowler has one goal and two assists in six games with the Ducks.

Fowler also has been cleared to return Wednesday after missing the past six games with a broken nose and a stiff neck. Phoenix’s Shane Doan ran him into the boards Oct. 17.

I’m not certain this is the best idea for the Ducks. For one thing, the team is obviously in disarray, so you’re not exactly keeping Fowler in a great environment. Is this the best situation for the talented blueliner to become acclimated?

Another important factor – especially with a team that’s, um, a little light in the wallet like the Ducks – is the fact that the team will have some tough contract negotiations in the summer that Fowler’s contract will expire. While Fowler will be a restricted free agent, both Corey Perry and Ryan Getzlaf will become unrestricted free agents at the same time.

If Fowler proves to be the kind of top-end talent many expected, that will be a tough summer for the Ducks. Then again, if he’s really as good as advertised, perhaps he’ll be worth the trouble.

Should he stay or go? Atlanta Thrashers forward Alex Burmistrov


As six NHL rookies near the nine game cut-off point from “burning” a year off their entry-level contracts, we’ll discuss the pros and cons of keeping each one at the NHL level vs. moving them down to the AHL. Sometimes the decision will already be made and we’ll just be sharing our two cents while in other instances the moves will come down to a near-coin toss. Either way, we hope you’re entertained and would love to hear your thoughts.

First up: Atlanta Thrashers forward Alex Burmistrov.

The Basics

  • Burmistrov was drafted eighth overall in the 2010 NHL Entry Draft.
  • He is tiny, at 5’1″ and 170 lbs.
  • He will play in his ninth game against the Rangers tonight.
  • Basic stats: zero points in eight games played.
  • He’s average a little under 15 minutes per night.
  • Burmistrov’s junior rights belong to the Barrie Colts in the OHL

What people are saying about him

If you ask Thrashers GM Rick Dudley, he’s almost guaranteed to stay at the NHL level. Here’s what Dudley said to the Sporting News.

“It’s 99 percent that we’ll keep him,” Dudley said. “There’s never been any talk of sending him back.”

There’s been growing speculation that Burmistrov, a center, might be headed back to OHL Barrie because he’s still looking for his first NHL point, but that speculation isn’t coming from the Thrashers’ front office. Dudley has been impressed with Burmistrov’s play without the puck, his efforts on defense and his strong play in key situations.

“He’s been one of our three or four top forwards every game,” Dudley said. “We’re not worried about points.”

James’ take:

I haven’t been able to watch every game very closely, so maybe Burmistrov really has been useful on defense and is “strong in key situations.”

It’s still difficult to get over that whole zero points thing. Why not let Burmistrov get an extra year of seasoning – and maybe improve his scoring confidence by playing in the minors – instead of burning an entry-level year in which the team is still a work in progress?

This isn’t a slam dunk, but I’m going with my gut on this one.

James’ verdict: Send him down.

Joe’s take:

Burmistrov is an interesting character. He hasn’t been thrown to the wolves to play on a top two scoring line. In fact, he’s been playing on the fourth line with a pair of grinders in Ben Eager and Chris Thorburn.  Burmistrov doesn’t have any points this season but he’s still played relatively well and it reflects upon his linemates as Thorburn has three goals and an assist  while Eager has a goal and a helper. He’s getting steady time on the ice, averaging over 14 minutes a game so he’s not being buried on the bench. Still, you’d like to see him do a bit more for himself offensively and that hasn’t happened as of yet. Perhaps he needs a few more games to get it going, but perhaps he just needs to grow up a little bit more. There’s a lot of hope and potential here for Burmistrov and getting him to develop the right way is important for Atlanta. The memories of former top pick Patrick Stefan failing to live up to his potential are still lingering as a reminder.

Joe’s verdict: Begrudgingly, send him down.

Six rookies near their nine game entry-level season deadline

2010 NHL Top Prospects Media Availability

NHL general managers make a ton of tough decisions, but one of the toughest involve how to handle young talent. In a salary cap era, you have to get plenty of bang for the buck, as many teams reap the benefits of a player’s entry-level contract years or a well-timed second contract.

This time around, six rookies are nearing the nine game deadline for GMs to decide whether to keep them at the NHL level or preserve a year on their entry level deals by sending them to the minors or juniors. NHL.com provides the list of those six players.

This season, the special six who remain with their teams are the Oilers’ Taylor Hall (first pick), the Bruins’ Tyler Seguin (second), the Islanders’ Nino Niederreiter (fifth), [Jeff] Skinner (seventh), the Thrashers’ Alexander Burmistrov (eighth) and the Ducks’ Cam Fowler (twelfth).

Here is a schedule of the dates in which each player will hit their ninth game of the season.

TBD: Fowler (Ducks)*

October 27: Niederreiter (Islanders), Burmistrov (Thrashers)

October 28: Skinner (Hurricanes)

October 29: Hall (Oilers)

November 3: Seguin (Bruins)

* – Only games played in count towards the limit. Being scratched or out due to injury doesn’t count towards the total.

It should be interesting to see how each team will handle their rookie situation. While Hall is almost certain to stay with Edmonton, players such as Niederreiter could go either way.

We’ll keep you up to date as these teams make their choices and might even provide our two cents on the matter.