Associated Press

The Buzzer: Kopitar scores four, McDavid’s four-point night and Olczyk cancer-free

Players of the Night:

Anze Kopitar, Los Angeles Kings: Two words: career night. Kopitar scored four goals, becoming the first Kings player in 25 years to do so, and thus, setting his own career-high in the process. The Kings decimated the Colorado Avalanche 7-1 in the process.

Sergei Bobrovsky, Columbus Blue Jackets: Bobrovsky made 33 saves en route to a shutout victory, the Blue Jackets’ 10th in a row in a 4-0 win against the Florida Panthers, who have been red-hot themselves.

Philipp Grubauer, Washington Capitals: Grubauer has been solid in relief of Braden Holtby down the stretch as the Capitals’ No. 1 gets some rest before a playoff push. He won his fourth start out of his past five since March 10, stopping all 39 shots that came his way in the shutout.

Connor McDavid, Edmonton Oilers: He’s not playing for a playoff spot, and he shouldn’t get too many votes for the Hart Trophy. But McDavid still has his eyes set on Mr. Art Ross. McDavid had two goals and two assists in a 6-2 win for the Oilers over the Ottawa Senators on Thursday. McDavid’s 94 points  (36 goals, 58 assists) are now just one shy of Nikita Kucherov for the NHL lead.

Highlights of the Night:

Above all else, this:

Hard work pays off:

Kopitar’s fourth:

Not everything is pretty when it comes to the Canucks. This is though:

Factoids of the Night:

Things you don’t see very often:

Poor Cam Ward:

Scores:

Blue Jackets 4, Panthers 0

Hurricanes 6, Coyotes 5

Flyers 4, Rangers 3

Lightning 7, Islanders 6

Capitals 1, Red Wings 0

Maple Leafs 5, Predators 2

Oilers 6, Senators 2

Canucks 5, Blackhawks 2

Kings 7, Avalanche 1

Sharks 2, Golden Knights 1 (OT)


Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

Eddie Olczyk declares he’s cancer-free

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It’s the news every hockey fan wanted to hear.

On Thursday night’s Chicago Blackhawks broadcast on NBC Sports Chicago, Eddie Olczyk, who was diagnosed last summer with colon cancer, told the hockey world some great news.

“I got the call on March 14 at 5:07 p.m. letting me know my scans were clear,” an emotional Olczyk said as he stood next to long-time broadcast partner Pat Foley. “I’ve never heard a better phrase in my life. I’m now 10 days on with the rest of my life.”

Olczyk, 51, had surgery after his diagnosis and had his last chemotherapy treatment on Feb. 21.

“All the cancer is gone – we beat this thing,” Olczyk said, thanking a handful of people, from colleagues at NBC to the Chicago Blackhawks and the NHL to his family members, wife and four kids. “And I say ‘we’ because it has been a team effort. We all beat this and I’m so thankful for all the support and prayers. They worked. I’m proud to stand here before everybody and say we beat this thing.”

Foley called Olczyk’s battle with cancer, “heroic.”

Olczyk was scheduled to have a scan in April to see how his chemo treatments had gone, but that scan was moved up due to emergency hernia surgery, according to Mark Lazerus of the Chicago Sun-Times.

“I’ve had enough crying to last me a lifetime,” Olczyk said. “I can’t emphasize enough just the support out there… just the texts, the email, the letters. I’ve received thousands and thousands of mail. I won’t be able to thank everybody, but I just want everybody to know on behalf of Eddie Olczyk and his family, we’re forever grateful for the support and the prayers and well wishes we received over the past seven months.”

Olczyk said one thing he realized through his battle is that he found out he was way tougher than he thought he ever was.

“If I can inspire one person to stay away from this, then I guess it was well worth it going through it,” he said.


Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

U.S. Hockey Hall of Famer Olczyk: “It means so much to me and my entire family”

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On Oct. 15, the U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame will induct its three newest members — Lou Lamoriello, Mike Modano and Ed Olczyk.

For the latter, the induction will celebrate much more than his days with the ‘Hawks, Leafs, Jets, Rangers, Kings and Penguins.

Olczyk has been instrumental in promoting the game in a number of ways — as a player, coach and broadcaster — something CSN Chicago encapsulates in its lengthy tribute to one of the most influential people in U.S. hockey history.

Here’s an excerpt from the piece, entitled An American Hero:

There’s no doubt Olczyk’s standout amateur career with Team USA and the 1984 U.S. Olympic Team, to go along with his stellar professional career in the NHL with Chicago, Pittsburgh, Toronto, Winnipeg, the New York Rangers (where he won a Stanley Cup championship in 1994) and Los Angeles — pouring in 342 goals, 794 points in 1,031 career games — have earned him a rightful place in the U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame, but Olczyk’s honor goes beyond that.  He’s a teacher of the game who wants to bring the sport of hockey to the forefront in the eyes of all American sports fans.

“I’m sure somebody can make the case that there are other people who have done more for hockey in the USA, but this guy’s got to be near, if not right at the top of that list,” said longtime Blackhawks play-by-play announcer and Olczyk’s on-air partner at Comcast SportsNet, Pat Foley.

“When I was told he was going into the U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame, I said ‘as a broadcaster?,’ added Foley.  “First of all, he’s that good, but second of all, he’s got a presence…he’s a teacher…he watches the game like a coach and he’s really good at passing along the rights, the wrongs, and how to do things properly.  Anybody who listens to him leaves smarter than when he showed up in terms of how to play the game of hockey and how to coach it.”

Prior to his days as an analyst, Olczyk was the head coach in Pittsburgh from 2003-05, a stint that included the first games of Sidney Crosby’s professional career. From there he proceeded to make his mark in the booth, serving alongside both Foley and, later, with Mike “Doc” Emrick on NBC.

But perhaps Olczyk’s proudest achievement was growing the sport he loves in the country he calls home. The rise in youth hockey enrollment and the strides USA Hockey has made at the junior and the u-18 levels are not lost on him.

“From the national exposure that the game is getting now, I take pride in being a part of the NBC team of bringing NHL games to people and the more people watch it, the more they want to continue to watch it,” Olczyk explained. “We’re in a fast food society.  We see it, we want it, we want to try it, and we want to go there.

“So, I take great pride in that aspect of it.”

To read more of CSN Chicago’s Olczyk interview, click here.

Marian Gaborik’s hit forces Frans Nielsen to leave Rangers-Islanders game

New York Rangers sniper Marian Gaborik usually finds himself on the wrong end of injury reports, but tonight he delivered a hit that forced another player out of a game. Gaborik received a two-minute boarding penalty (and created a scuffle that inspired some matching roughing minors) after checking New York Islanders Frans Nielsen from behind.

Eddie Olczyk and Jeremy Roenick partially blamed Nielsen for the impact of the hit during a Versus intermission report, saying that he put himself in danger by turning his back at an awkward time. Roenick went far enough to say that the injury didn’t look that bad, judging from his own experiences, but we’ll have to wait and see if JR was correct. Nielsen reportedly won’t return to a Rangers-Islanders game that only really means anything to the Rangers.

There’s no word on how severe the injury actually is and it’s tough to say if Gaborik is at risk of facing any discipline from the league. If Nielsen’s injury is even somewhat serious, then the Islanders would probably be wise to shut him down for the season, since they only have draft positioning to (not?) fight for at this point.