Ed Snider

Yong Kim/The Philadelphia Inquirer via AP)

Flyers founder Ed Snider honored with statue outside Wells Fargo Center

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Philadelphia Flyers founder Ed Snider was honored with a 9-foot bronze statue outside the Wells Fargo Center.

Snider founded the team in the 1960s and remained chairman until his death in April 2016. The statue was unveiled before the Flyers played Nashville on Thursday to mark the 50th anniversary of the Flyers’ first home game in 1967.

Chad Fisher, of Fisher Sculpture of Dillsburg, Pennsylvania, created and built the 1,300-pound bronze statue, which stands on a 3-foot base encased by granite.

Snider’s statue has a Stanley Cup championship ring on his left ring finger that fans are encouraged to rub for good luck. Flyers President Paul Holmgren was one of the first to rub the ring on the statue.

NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman said the statue, like Snider’s accomplishments, ”were larger than life.”

The Flyers won Stanley Cups under Snider in 1974 and 1975.

Hall of Famers Bernie Parent and Bobby Clarke and dozens of former Flyers greats attended the dedication.

”Everything I am as a human being, thank you Ed Snider,” Parent said as he threw a kiss toward the statue.

Snider’s daughter, Lindy, spoke on behalf of the family and encouraged fans to rub the ring.

”Paul, especially you,” she told Holmgren. ”The pressure’s on. You’re not off the hook.”

Snider was arguably the most influential executive in Philadelphia sports. He was chairman of the 76ers, was once a part-owner of the Eagles and had a hand in founding both Comcast’s local sports channel and the city’s largest sports-talk radio station.

Snider was elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1988.

Overtime format highlights competition committee meeting agenda

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The topic of 3-on-3 overtime is one of a few topics on the agenda for Thursday’s competition committee meeting.

Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman believes we could see a 3-on-3 overtime format tested during the preseason, but not implemented for the 2015-16 regular season.

Also on the agenda for this week’s meeting is the coach’s challenge, the idea of the center in the defensive zone putting his stick down first during face-offs and the salary cap escalator.

Recommendations made at the competition committee meeting would have to be voted on by the NHL’s Board of Governors in late June prior to being implemented for the 2015-16 season.

The aforementioned topics were all initially discussed at the March general managers’ meetings in Boca Raton, Florida.

General managers Ken Holland, Don Maloney, David Poile along with Ed Snider will represent league (with Colin Campbell in a non-voting role) at the meeting in New York.

Mike Cammalleri, Cory Schneider, Kevin Shattenkirk and Daniel Winnik represent the NHLPA (with Mathieu Schneider in a non-voting role).

Flyers brass wants more from Lecavalier next season

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It was a trying first season in Philadelphia for Vincent Lecavalier.

He missed 13 games with injury and went through the motions of adapting to a new team. While he finished the season with 20 goals, Flyers GM Paul Holmgren and owner Ed Snider both expressed hope he’ll pick things up next season as Tim Panaccio of CSNPhilly.com shares.

He’s a good hockey player,” Snider said. “He got 20 goals with all the problems … he had a problem this year, but it’s got to be solved by next year.”

Holmgren said he was “disappointed”  for, not in, Lecavalier for how things went this season and said, “a lot of things went against him.”

The Flyers signed Lecavalier to a five-year, $22.5 million deal last summer after the former Tampa Bay Lightning captain was bought out by the team.

At 34 years old, Lecavalier’s best seasons are likely behind him and if there’s something for the Flyers to be nervous about, it’s his health. The last time he played a full season was 2009-10. If his health can get settled down, perhaps he can have a stronger season in 2014-15.

PHT Morning Skate: Monahan excites Flames with 20-goal season

PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

Flames rookie Sean Monahan scored his 20th goal of the season on Sunday. He’s the first Flames rookie forward to do that since Jarome Iginla in 1996-1997. He’s the first Flames rookie at all to do it since Dion Phaneuf in 2005-06. (Flames)

Editor’s Note: Pro Hockey Talk’s partner FanDuel is hosting a $1,000 Fantasy Hockey league for Monday’s NHL games. It’s just $10 to join and first prize is $200. Starts Monday at 7:30pm ETHere’s the FanDuel link.

Brooks Orpik’s hit on Jonathan Toews during Pittsburgh’s win against Chicago Sunday night is still talk of the town. Patrick Sharp has a thought on what went down there:

March was a tough month for Washington’s Alex Ovechkin. He didn’t score any even-strength points. Everything he got came on the power play and it’s not the first time that’s happened. (Adam Vignan via Twitter)

Sabres youngster Mikhail Grigorenko is headed to AHL Rochester after the Quebec Remparts were eliminated from the QMJHL playoffs. (Sabres)

Flyers owner Ed Snider is doing some outstanding charitable work in Philadelphia that’s also helping grow the game there. (NHL.com)

Finally, if you missed this on Saturday night you’re not alone. Kings goalie Jonathan Quick had one of the most acrobatic saves of the season to deny Jets forward Blake Wheeler a goal. Just call him “The Scorpion King.”

Flyers first head coach, Keith Allen, dead at age 90

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The man who oversaw two Stanley Cup championship teams in Philadelphia is dead.

Keith Allen passed away at the age of 90. He was the team’s first head coach during the 1967-68 season and was the general manager of the Flyers in 1974 and 1975 when he put together the “Broad Street Bullies” coached by Fred Shero.

Flyers chairman Ed Snider remembered Allen fondly.

“Keith was the first coach in the history of the Philadelphia Flyers and a man for whom I have tremendous respect,” said Snider. “In my mind, he was and always will be one of the greatest General Managers in the history of hockey. He was known as ‘Keith the Thief,’ I never knew of a bad deal he made. This team would never have reached the level of success we have had over the past 48 years if it were not for Keith.”

Allen coached the Flyers until 1970. In 1969 he became the general manager, a job he kept until May 1983. Allen was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1992 and won the Lester Patrick Trophy in 1988.

While Allen is remembered as a great executive, he was also a solid player in his day and was a member of the 1953-54 Stanley Cup champion Detroit Red Wings.