Tag: Dwayne Roloson

Steven Stamkos

It’s Tampa Bay Lightning day on PHT


Welcome to our offseason initiative — 30 teams in 30 days.

From July 16 until Aug. 14, we’ll be dedicating each day to a new team by recapping the offseason and looking ahead to 2012-13.

There will also be a series of posts looking at key stories, player profiles and burning questions regarding each squad.

Today we continue with the Tampa Bay Lightning.

After falling one win short of the 2011 Stanley Cup finals, the Lightning fell far and hard last season.

Injuries and Dwayne Roloson’s pronounced regression fueled a rough season, prompting GM Steve Yzerman to make some substantial changes during this offseason.

The Bolts experienced a significant makeover which focuses primarily on stopping opponents from scoring goals.

In net, Mathieu Garon remains a safety net behind Anders Lindback – a young goalie whose thin resume and intriguing potential represents a complete 180 from Roloson.

Those two goalies should enjoy superior defensive support, too.

Yzerman landed one of the biggest free agent blueliners Matt Carle and also added fragile (but useful) defenseman Sami Salo from Vancouver.

Combine those additions with Victor Hedman’s development and life could be significantly easier for Lightning goalies.

PHT will examine multiple storylines to see where, exactly, those changes might place this team today.

Martin Brodeur and the over-40 goalie club

Martin Brodeur

Martin Brodeur — who turned 40 on May 6 — is set to join an elite club of goalies this season.

The New Jersey Devils netminder will become just one of a handful to play past the age of 40 since the lockout, and one of a smaller handful to be the starter.

Let’s take a look at the history…

Ed Belfour, Toronto/Florida

Belfour turned 40 a few months prior to the first post-lockout season, and it didn’t go very well (his 2005-06 numbers: 22-22-4, .892 save percentage, .329 GAA.) Those were way off the numbers he posted pre-lockout (in 2003-04, he had 10 shutouts) and suddenly, Belfour looked to be Exhibit A of Veteran Players That Couldn’t Adapt To The New NHL.

But in a weird twist, he signed in Florida the next season and — at age 41 — improved.

He played 58 games in 2006-07 and went 27-17-10 with a .902 save percentage and 2.77 GAA…yet the Panthers decided to cut him loose after the year. It would be his final season in the NHL.

Dominik Hasek, Ottawa/Detroit

Hasek played three years after the lockout with his most impressive campaign coming in 2006-07. Hasek went 38-11-6 with a .913 save percentage, 2.05 GAA and eight shutouts — and turned 42 midway through the season.

What’s truly remarkable about 2006-07 is Hasek played in 18 games that postseason, pushing his overall total on the year to 74. Seventy four games for a 42-year-old is, like, a lot (some quality PHT analysis right there.)

In a related story, Hasek now wants to come back to the NHL — at age 47.

Dwayne Roloson, Tampa Bay/New York Islanders

Roloson’s exploits in his first year with the Lightning — four shutouts in 34 regular season games, backstopping Tampa to Game 7 of the Eastern Conference finals — were diminished by last year’s disastrous campaign. But they shouldn’t be.

What Roloson accomplished after turning 40 is wildly impressive. In 2009-10, he posted a winning record (23-18-7) on a losing Islanders team (34-37-11). A year later, he made 71 appearances (20 with NYI, 34 with TB, 17 in the playoffs).


Curtis Joseph kicked around Calgary and Toronto after turning 40, but served strictly in a backup role.

Sean Burke turned 40 midway through his last and only year with the Kings (2006-07), splitting time with Mathieu Garon and Dan Cloutier.

Of note, Nikolai Khabibulin turns 40 on Jan. 13 and could very well be the starter in Edmonton at that time.


Who should New Jersey’s next captain be?

Offseason Report: New Jersey Devils

It’s New Jersey Devils day on PHT

Hasek’s agent on NHL comeback: “He will play, and he will excel”

Dominik Hasek Detroit

According to Ritch Winter — the agent representing 47-year-old goalie Dominik Hasek — there’s no backup plan for his comeback to the NHL.

The NHL is the plan.

“He will play,” Winter told ProHockeyTalk. “There is no option. He will play and he will excel and he will do all of the things he can do.

“That’s his view of it. There’s one objective, and that’s it — he won’t fail.”

Winter claims he’s already fielded interest from “about a half dozen” NHL clubs about the two-time league MVP.

(Note: Toronto was not one of those teams — “It doesn’t look like a spot,” Winter said.)

There’s a high curiosity factor in Hasek’s comeback, primarily because he’s one of the greatest goalies ever.

There’s also the fact Hasek plays a position where age doesn’t factor as much as, say, forward or defense. Martin Brodeur played in the 2012 Stanley Cup finals a month after turning 40; in 2011, Dwayne Roloson (41) became the oldest goalie in league history to post a playoff shutout.

(At 45, Hasek won a Czech league title — and playoff MVP — with Pardubice. At 46, he led the KHL with seven shutouts.)

There’s also his notorious fitness regime. Winter says that, even at 47 — he’ll turn 48 in January — Hasek’s maintained all his capacities and skills from his glory years in Buffalo.

“He’s done all of the stuff you’d expect a NASA scientist to do before they go into a venture like this,” Winter explained. “He’s measured his reflexes, he’s measured his reaction time and it’s identical to what it was at the time he won a number of Vezina trophies. He’s actually 1.6 pounds off his playing weight at the Nagano Olympics [in 1998].

“Who keeps records like that? I guess Dom. Who knows their body, does reaction time and reflex training and measurement? I guess Dom.”

Finally — and perhaps most importantly — there are the expectations Hasek has for himself. A noted perfectionist, he always held himself to an exceptionally high standard during his playing days…and that doesn’t seem to have changed during his time off.

“[Hasek] feels confident that he can be considerably better than any backup in this league,” Winter said. “He thinks he can push to be in the bottom-half of the top third of the league.

“That’s his view.”


Report: Hasek looking for a multi-year deal

Current, former goalies think Hasek could return to NHL