Tag: Dwayne Roloson

Martin Brodeur

Martin Brodeur and the over-40 goalie club


Martin Brodeur — who turned 40 on May 6 — is set to join an elite club of goalies this season.

The New Jersey Devils netminder will become just one of a handful to play past the age of 40 since the lockout, and one of a smaller handful to be the starter.

Let’s take a look at the history…

Ed Belfour, Toronto/Florida

Belfour turned 40 a few months prior to the first post-lockout season, and it didn’t go very well (his 2005-06 numbers: 22-22-4, .892 save percentage, .329 GAA.) Those were way off the numbers he posted pre-lockout (in 2003-04, he had 10 shutouts) and suddenly, Belfour looked to be Exhibit A of Veteran Players That Couldn’t Adapt To The New NHL.

But in a weird twist, he signed in Florida the next season and — at age 41 — improved.

He played 58 games in 2006-07 and went 27-17-10 with a .902 save percentage and 2.77 GAA…yet the Panthers decided to cut him loose after the year. It would be his final season in the NHL.

Dominik Hasek, Ottawa/Detroit

Hasek played three years after the lockout with his most impressive campaign coming in 2006-07. Hasek went 38-11-6 with a .913 save percentage, 2.05 GAA and eight shutouts — and turned 42 midway through the season.

What’s truly remarkable about 2006-07 is Hasek played in 18 games that postseason, pushing his overall total on the year to 74. Seventy four games for a 42-year-old is, like, a lot (some quality PHT analysis right there.)

In a related story, Hasek now wants to come back to the NHL — at age 47.

Dwayne Roloson, Tampa Bay/New York Islanders

Roloson’s exploits in his first year with the Lightning — four shutouts in 34 regular season games, backstopping Tampa to Game 7 of the Eastern Conference finals — were diminished by last year’s disastrous campaign. But they shouldn’t be.

What Roloson accomplished after turning 40 is wildly impressive. In 2009-10, he posted a winning record (23-18-7) on a losing Islanders team (34-37-11). A year later, he made 71 appearances (20 with NYI, 34 with TB, 17 in the playoffs).


Curtis Joseph kicked around Calgary and Toronto after turning 40, but served strictly in a backup role.

Sean Burke turned 40 midway through his last and only year with the Kings (2006-07), splitting time with Mathieu Garon and Dan Cloutier.

Of note, Nikolai Khabibulin turns 40 on Jan. 13 and could very well be the starter in Edmonton at that time.


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Offseason Report: New Jersey Devils

It’s New Jersey Devils day on PHT

Hasek’s agent on NHL comeback: “He will play, and he will excel”

Dominik Hasek Detroit

According to Ritch Winter — the agent representing 47-year-old goalie Dominik Hasek — there’s no backup plan for his comeback to the NHL.

The NHL is the plan.

“He will play,” Winter told ProHockeyTalk. “There is no option. He will play and he will excel and he will do all of the things he can do.

“That’s his view of it. There’s one objective, and that’s it — he won’t fail.”

Winter claims he’s already fielded interest from “about a half dozen” NHL clubs about the two-time league MVP.

(Note: Toronto was not one of those teams — “It doesn’t look like a spot,” Winter said.)

There’s a high curiosity factor in Hasek’s comeback, primarily because he’s one of the greatest goalies ever.

There’s also the fact Hasek plays a position where age doesn’t factor as much as, say, forward or defense. Martin Brodeur played in the 2012 Stanley Cup finals a month after turning 40; in 2011, Dwayne Roloson (41) became the oldest goalie in league history to post a playoff shutout.

(At 45, Hasek won a Czech league title — and playoff MVP — with Pardubice. At 46, he led the KHL with seven shutouts.)

There’s also his notorious fitness regime. Winter says that, even at 47 — he’ll turn 48 in January — Hasek’s maintained all his capacities and skills from his glory years in Buffalo.

“He’s done all of the stuff you’d expect a NASA scientist to do before they go into a venture like this,” Winter explained. “He’s measured his reflexes, he’s measured his reaction time and it’s identical to what it was at the time he won a number of Vezina trophies. He’s actually 1.6 pounds off his playing weight at the Nagano Olympics [in 1998].

“Who keeps records like that? I guess Dom. Who knows their body, does reaction time and reflex training and measurement? I guess Dom.”

Finally — and perhaps most importantly — there are the expectations Hasek has for himself. A noted perfectionist, he always held himself to an exceptionally high standard during his playing days…and that doesn’t seem to have changed during his time off.

“[Hasek] feels confident that he can be considerably better than any backup in this league,” Winter said. “He thinks he can push to be in the bottom-half of the top third of the league.

“That’s his view.”


Report: Hasek looking for a multi-year deal

Current, former goalies think Hasek could return to NHL

He’s back: Selanne agrees to one-year, $4.5 million deal with Anaheim

Teemu Selanne

Teemu Selanne isn’t saying goodbye just yet.

That’s the word out of Anaheim today as the club announced Selanne has agreed to a one-year deal with the Ducks:

“I still feel I can play at a high level,” said Selanne. “As I always say, this is my happy place and I can’t wait to get back on the ice in front of our great fans.”

Lisa Dillman of the LA Times reports the deal will be worth $4.5 million — a $500,000 raise from the $4 million he made last year.

Selanne, who turned 42 on July 3, returns for his 20th NHL season after scoring 26G-40A-66PTS in 82 games last year.

With Dwayne Roloson still unsigned and Nicklas Lidstrom retired, the new deal officially makes Selanne the NHL’s oldest active player (the second oldest is Dallas’ Jaromir Jagr, 40.)

“While I’m still amazed by his speed and skill level, it’s Teemu’s love for the game and his teammates that make him so special,” said Ducks General Manager Bob Murray. “Anaheim is where he belongs.”

With the signing, a veteran-laden Ducks club gets even older. The 42-year-old Selanne will suit up next season alongside Saku Koivu (37 years old), Sheldon Souray (36 on July 13), Toni Lydman (34), Francois Beauchemin (32) and Bryan Allen (31).

Phoenix names Burke assistant (to the) GM

Sean Burke

Sean Burke is movin’ on up.

That was the word out of Phoenix on Tuesday as ‘Yotes GM Don Maloney promoted Burke to assistant (to the) general manager.

Burke signed a three-year contract extension with the club, one that will see him undertake a new gig while still serving in his previous roles as goalie coach and director of player development.

“For the past three years, Sean has done a tremendous job working with all the goaltenders in our organization helping them improve and succeed on the ice,” Maloney said in a statement. “We look forward to him continuing in this role and also assisting our hockey operations department in all areas of the business.”

Burke has been largely credited with Mike Smith’s remarkable turnaround, arguably the defining act of his time in Phoenix.

Last season, Smith reached career highs in games played (67), wins (38), goals-against average (2.21), save percentage (.930) and shutouts (eight) — this after  he was allowed to walk from Tampa, where he served as Dwayne Roloson’s backup.

What’s more, the Coyotes signed Smith for $2 million — a bargain basement price considering he finished fourth in this year’s Vezina voting (earning two first-place votes) and 11th in Hart Trophy voting.

Report: Lightning, Matt Carle “closing in” on deal

Ottawa Senators v Philadelphia Flyers

After a surprisingly successful first season with GM Steve Yzerman and head coach Guy Boucher in Tampa Bay, the Lightning didn’t just regress in 2011-12. They basically hit a brick wall. The two main culprits were poor defense and lax goaltending, but it looks like Yzerman is taking great lengths to fix both problems. Darren Dreger passes along what might be the splashiest move yet: the Lightning are reportedly “closing in” on a deal with free agent blueliner Matt Carle.

Obviously, “closing in on” and actually signing a contract are two very different things, but it fill a need for the Bolts. The timing also makes sense since the Ryan Suter sweepstakes finally ended.

If Carle was in the mix, the Bolts’ defense would look a lot more impressive. Even with Mattias Ohlund’s career in jeopardy and 2012-13 season essentially over, the blueline should provide better protection for Anders Lindback than what Dwayne Roloson saw last year. Carle would join new addition Sami Salo along with guys like Eric Brewer and Victor Hedman for an improved corps.

Carle has hovered around the 35-40 point range for the last three seasons and many believe his defense is underrated. He averaged 23:01 minutes per game for the Philadelphia Flyers last season and ranks as the most interesting remaining FA defenseman.

Interestingly enough, he’s also marginally familiar to Tampa Bay. He played 12 games with the Bolts in 2008-09 before being traded to Philly in a Steve Downie trade.

We’ll see if he gets a lengthier reunion with the Lightning or if another team – perhaps his current one in Philly? – ends up closing the deal. In the mean time, let me ask: would Carle (and the other tweaks) make the Lightning a contender again?